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Ana S. Iltis [65]Ana Smith Iltis [25]Ana Iltis [16]Anas Iltis [1]
Ana Lucia Smith Iltis [1]
  1.  17
    Expertise, Ethics Expertise, and Clinical Ethics Consultation: Achieving Terminological Clarity.Ana S. Iltis & Mark Sheehan - 2016 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 41 (4):416-433.
    The language of ethics expertise has become particularly important in bioethics in light of efforts to establish the value of the clinical ethics consultation, to specify who is qualified to function as a clinical ethics consultant, and to characterize how one should evaluate whether or not a person is so qualified. Supporters and skeptics about the possibility of ethics expertise use the language of ethics expertise in ways that reflect competing views about what ethics expertise entails. We argue for clarity (...)
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  2.  26
    The “Ethics” Expertise in Clinical Ethics Consultation.Ana S. Iltis & Lisa M. Rasmussen - 2016 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 41 (4):363-368.
    The nature, possibility, and implications of ethics expertise in general and of bioethics expertise in particular has been the focus of extensive debate for over thirty years. What is ethics expertise and what does it enable experts to do? Knowing what ethics expertise is can help answer another important question: What, if anything, makes a claim of expertise legitimate? In other words, how does someone earn the appellation “ethics expert?” There remains deep disagreement on whether ethics expertise is possible, and (...)
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  3.  48
    Organ Donation, Brain Death and the Family: Valid Informed Consent.Ana S. Iltis - 2015 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 43 (2):369-382.
    I argue that valid informed consent is ethically required for organ donation from individuals declared dead using neurological criteria. Current policies in the U.S. do not require this and, not surprisingly, current practices inhibit the possibility of informed consent. Relevant information is withheld, opportunities to ensure understanding and appreciation are extremely limited, and the ability to make and communicate a free and voluntary decision is hindered by incomplete disclosure and other practices. Current practices should be revised to facilitate valid informed (...)
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  4.  54
    Bioethics as Methodological Case Resolution: Specification, Specified Principlism and Casuistry.Ana Smith Iltis - 2000 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (3):271-284.
    Bioethical decision-making depends on presuppositions about the function and goal of bioethics. The authors in this issue of The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy share the assumption that bioethics is about resolving cases, not about moral theory, and that the best method of bioethical decision-making is that which produces useful answers. Because we have no universally agreed upon background moral theory which can serve as the basis for bioethical decision-making, they try to move bioethics away from theory. For them, a (...)
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  5.  16
    Risk-Taking: Individual and Family Interests.Ana S. Iltis - 2015 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 40 (4):437-450.
    Decisions regarding clinical procedures or research participation typically require the informed consent of individuals. When individuals are unable to give consent, the informed permission of a legally authorized representative or surrogate is required. Although many proposed procedures are aimed primarily at benefiting the individual, some are not. I argue that, particularly when individuals are asked to assume risks primarily or exclusively for the benefit of others, family members ought to be engaged in the informed consent process. Examples of procedures in (...)
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  6.  17
    Ethics: The Art of Wandering Aimlessly?Ana Iltis - 2019 - Christian Bioethics 25 (1):128-143.
    Questions concerning the role (or lack thereof) of God in morality are implicitly or explicitly important in Western philosophical ethics. I describe some of the different ways philosophers treat (or ignore) God and the foundations of morality more generally, and I highlight some of the implications of these approaches for bioethics. I demonstrate that the starting points we choose for morality set the course for fundamentally different accounts of what is permissible and impermissible, good and bad, and right and wrong.
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  7.  27
    Heads, Bodies, Brains, and Selves: Personal Identity and the Ethics of Whole-Body Transplantation.Ana Iltis - 2022 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 47 (2):257-278.
    Plans to attempt what has been called a head transplant, a body transplant, and a head-to-body transplant in human beings raise numerous ethical, social, and legal questions, including the circumstances, if any, under which it would be ethically permissible to attempt whole-body transplantation (WBT) in human beings, the possible effect of WBT on family relationships, and how families should shape WBT decisions. Our assessment of many of these questions depends partially on how we respond to sometimes centuries-old philosophical thought experiments (...)
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  8.  44
    Toward a Coherent Account of Pediatric Decision Making.Ana S. Iltis - 2010 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 35 (5):526-552.
    Within and among societies, there are competing understandings of the status of children, including debates over whether they can bear rights and, if so, which rights they bear and against whom, and their capacity to make decisions and be held responsible and accountable for actions. There also are different understandings of what constitutes a family; what authority parents have over and regarding their children; and what should happen to children who are without parents because of death, desertion, or imprisonment. These (...)
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  9.  13
    Prenatal screening and prenatal diagnosis: contemporary practices in light of the past.Ana S. Iltis - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (6):334-339.
    The 20th century eugenics movement in the USA and contemporary practices involving prenatal screening (PNS), prenatal diagnosis (PND), abortion and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) share important morally relevant similarities. I summarise some features of the 20th century eugenics movement; describe the contemporary standard of care in the USA regarding PNS, PND, abortion and PGD; and demonstrate that the ‘old eugenics’ the contemporary standard of care share the underlying view that social resources should be invested to prevent the birth of people (...)
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  10.  4
    Severing Clinical Ethics Consultation from the Ethical Commitments and Preferences of Clinical Ethics Consultants.Ana S. Iltis - 2022 - Christian Bioethics 28 (2):122-133.
    Recent work calls for excluding clinical ethics consultants’ religious ethical commitments from formulating recommendations about particular cases and communicating those recommendations. I demonstrate that three arguments that call for excluding religious ethical commitments from this work logically imply that consultants may not use their secular ethical commitments in their work. The call to sever clinical ethics consultation from the ethical commitments of clinical ethics consultants has implications for the scope of work consultants may do and for the competencies required for (...)
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  11.  4
    Counselling, Research Gaps, and Ethical Considerations Surrounding Pregnancy in Solid Organ Transplant Recipients.Deirdre Sawinski, Steven J. Ralston, Lisa Coscia, Christina L. Klein, Eileen Y. Wang, Paige Porret, Kathleen O’Neill & Ana S. Iltis - 2022 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 20 (1):89-99.
    Survival after solid-organ transplantation has improved significantly, and many contemporary transplant recipients are of childbearing potential. There are limited data to guide decision-making surrounding pregnancy after transplantation, variations in clinical practice, and significant knowledge gaps, all of which raise significant ethical issues. Post-transplant pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of maternal and fetal complications. Shared decision-making is a central aspect of patient counselling but is complicated by significant knowledge gaps. Stakeholder interests can be in conflict; exploring these tensions can (...)
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  12.  41
    Look who's talking: The interdisciplinarity of bioethics and the implications for bioethics education.Ana Iltis - 2006 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (6):629 – 641.
    There are competing accounts of the birth of bioethics. Despite the differences among them, these accounts share the claim that bioethics was not born in a single disciplinary home or in a single social space, but in numerous, including hospitals, doctors' offices, research laboratories, courtrooms, medical schools, churches and synagogues, and philosophy classrooms. This essay considers the interdisciplinarity of bioethics and the contribution of new disciplines to bioethics. It also explores the implications of interdisciplinarity for bioethics education. As bioethics develops, (...)
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  13.  10
    Building Norms for Organ Donation in China: Pitfalls and Challenges.Ana S. Iltis - 2019 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 44 (5):640-662.
    In most, if not all, jurisdictions with active organ transplantation programs, there is a persistent desire to increase donation rates because the demand for transplantable organs exceeds the supply. China, in particular, faces an extraordinary gap between the number of organs donated by deceased donors and the number of people seeking one or more transplants. China might look to Western countries with higher donation rates to determine how best to introduce Western practices into the Chinese system. In attempting to increase (...)
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  14.  25
    Bioethics and the Culture Wars.Ana S. Iltis - 2011 - Christian Bioethics 17 (1):9-24.
    The term ‘culture wars’ has been used to describe deep, apparently intractable, disagreements between groups for many years. In contemporary discourse, it refers to disputes regarding significant moral matters carried out in the public square and for which there appears to be no way to achieve consensus or compromise. One set of battle lines is drawn between those who hold traditional Christian commitments and those who do not. Christian bioethics is nested in a set of moral and metaphysical understandings that (...)
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  15.  9
    Rethinking Human Embryo Research Policies.Kirstin R. W. Matthews, Ana S. Iltis, Nuria Gallego Marquez, Daniel S. Wagner, Jason Scott Robert, Inmaculada de Melo-Martín, Marieke Bigg, Sarah Franklin, Soren Holm, Ingrid Metzler, Matteo A. Molè, Jochen Taupitz, Giuseppe Testa & Jeremy Sugarman - 2021 - Hastings Center Report 51 (1):47-51.
    It now seems technically feasible to culture human embryos beyond the “fourteen‐day limit,” which has the potential to increase scientific understanding of human development and perhaps improve infertility treatments. The fourteen‐day limit was adopted as a compromise but subsequently has been considered an ethical line. Does it remain relevant in light of technological advances permitting embryo maturation beyond it? Should it be changed and, if so, how and why? What justifications would be necessary to expand the limit, particularly given that (...)
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  16.  14
    Moral Epistemology and Bioethics: Is the New Natural Law the Solution to Otherwise Intractable Disputes?Ana S. Iltis - 2016 - Christian Bioethics 22 (2):169-185.
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  17.  46
    The Oxford Handbook of Research Ethics.Ana S. Iltis & Douglas MacKay (eds.) - 2020 - New York, NY, USA: Oxford University Press.
    This handbook is currently in development, with individual articles publishing online in advance of print publication. At this time, we cannot add information about unpublished articles in this handbook, however the table of contents will continue to grow as additional articles pass through the review process and are added to the site. Please note that the online publication date for this handbook is the date that the first article in the title was published online. For more information, please read the (...)
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  18.  15
    Points to consider: The research ethics consultation service and the IRB.Laura M. Beskow, Christine Grady, Ana S. Iltis, John Z. Sadler & Benjamin S. Wilfond - 2009 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 31 (6):1.
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  19.  6
    Engelhardt on the Common Morality in Bioethics.Ana S. Iltis - 2018 - Conatus 3 (2):49.
    Contemporary bioethics is, at least in part, the product of biomedical and sociopolitical changes in the middle to latter part of the 20th century. These changes prompted reflection on deep moral questions at a time when traditional sources of moral guidance no longer were widely respected and, in some cases, were being rejected. In light of this, scholars, policy makers, and clinicians sought to identify a common morality that could be used among persons with different moral commitments to resolve disputes (...)
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  20.  13
    Strangers at the Altar.Ana Iltis - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (6):19-22.
    “Outsiders” addressing ethical issues in medicine—Strangers at the Bedside —became “bioethicists.” Bioethicists providing research ethics consultation have been described as “stranger...
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  21.  71
    Institutional Integrity in Roman Catholic Health Care Institutions.Ana Smith Iltis - 2001 - Christian Bioethics 7 (1):95-103.
    Issues of institutional identity and integrity in Roman Catholic health care institutions have been addressed at the level of individual institutions as well as by organizations of Catholic health care providers and at various levels in the Church hierarchy. The papers by Carol Taylor, C.S.F.N, Thomas Shannon, Kevin O’Rourke, O.P., Gerard Magill in this volume provide a significant contribution to concerns of Roman Catholic health care institutions as they face the challenges of providing health care in a secular, pluralistic, market-driven (...)
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  22.  7
    Bioethics and Democracy: Competing Roles of National Bioethics Organisations.Susan Dodds, Colin Thomson, Robert M. Veatch, Arthur Caplan, Autumn Fiester, H. Tristram Engelhardt, Ana Smith Iltis, Fabrice Jotterand, Wenmay Rei & Jiunn-Rong Yeh - 2006 - Bioethics 20 (6):326-338.
    ABSTRACT In establishing National Bioethics Organisations (NBOs), liberal democracies seek to acknowledge the diversity of strongly held ethical positions and the imperative to engage in public debate about important bioethical decisions. NBOs are typically given a range of responsibilities, including contributing to and stimulating public debate; providing expert opinion on relevant issues for policy deliberations; and developing public policy. The state is now found to have an interest in areas previously thought to be a matter of individual choice. NBOs can (...)
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  23.  37
    Lay concepts in informed consent to biomedical research: The capacity to understand and appreciate risk.Ana Iltis - 2006 - Bioethics 20 (4):180–190.
    ABSTRACT Persons generally must give their informed consent to participate in research. To provide informed consent persons must be given information regarding the study in simple, lay language. Consent must be voluntary, and persons giving consent must be legally competent to consent and possess the capacity to understand and appreciate the information provided. This paper examines the relationship between the obligation to disclose information regarding risks and the requirement that persons have the capacity to understand and appreciate the information. There (...)
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  24.  34
    Introduction: Vulnerability in Biomedical Research.Ana S. Iltis - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (1):6-11.
  25.  19
    COVID-19 and Financial Vulnerability: What Health Care Organizations and Society Owe Each Other.Thomas D. Harter, Ana Iltis, Maria C. Clay & Mark Aulisio - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (7):139-141.
    Volume 20, Issue 7, July 2020, Page 139-141.
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  26. Families and Medical Decisions to Assume Risks for the Benefit of Others.Ana Iltis - 2015 - In Ruiping Fan (ed.), Family-Oriented Informed Consent. Springer Verlag.
     
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  27.  43
    On the Impermissibility of Euthanasia in Catholic Healthcare Organizations.Ana S. Iltis - 2006 - Christian Bioethics 12 (3):281-290.
    Roman Catholic healthcare institutions in the United States face a number of threats to the integrity of their missions, including the increasing religious and moral pluralism of society and the financial crisis many organizations face. These organizations in the United States often have fought fervently to avoid being obligated to provide interventions they deem intrinsically immoral, such as abortion. Such institutions no doubt have made numerous accommodations and changes in how they operate in response to the growing pluralism of our (...)
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  28. 1 Human subjects research.Ana Smith Iltis - forthcoming - Research Ethics.
     
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  29.  7
    Introduction: Vulnerability in Biomedical Research.Ana S. Iltis - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (1):6-11.
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  30.  16
    Living Organ Donation Near and at the End of Life: Drawing and Re-Drawing the Boundaries Around Permissible Practices in Organ Donation.Ana S. Iltis - 2019 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 47 (1):123-125.
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  31. Human subjects research : Ethics and compliance.Ana Smith Iltis - 2006 - In Research Ethics. Routledge.
     
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  32.  26
    Organizational ethics and institutional integrity.Ana Smith Iltis - 2001 - HEC Forum 13 (4):317-328.
  33.  11
    The Failure of Peer Review.Ana Iltis - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 8 (4):214-216.
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  34.  7
    Philosophy.Ana S. Iltis - 2023 - Res Philosophica 100 (4):539-559.
    Socio-cultural shifts during the 1960s and 1970s included widespread secularization, challenges to authority and tradition, and an emphasis on individual choice. Healthcare and biomedical research advances accompanied these social changes, giving rise to numerous ethical and policy questions. The contemporary bioethics project emerged in this context with (at least) three aims: (1) to offer practical answers to these questions (often) in ways that (2) facilitate or support particular practices or goals (e.g., organ donation or human research) and that (3) appear (...)
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  35.  23
    Unproven stem cell–based interventions and achieving a compromise policy among the multiple stakeholders.Kirstin R. W. Matthews & Ana S. Iltis - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):1-11.
    BackgroundIn 2004, patient advocate groups were major players in helping pass and implement significant public policy and funding initiatives in stem cells and regenerative medicine. In the following years, advocates were also actively engaged in Washington DC, encouraging policy makers to broaden embryonic stem cell research funding, which was ultimately passed after President Barack Obama came into office. Many advocates did this because they were told stem cell research would lead to cures. After waiting more than 10 years, many of (...)
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  36.  29
    Timing invitations to participate in clinical research: Preliminary versus informed consent.Ana Smith Iltis - 2005 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 30 (1):89 – 106.
    This article addresses the impact of the potential conflict between the roles of physicians who are both clinicians and researchers on the recruitment of persons into research trials. It has been proposedthat a physician breaches inter-role confidentiality when he or she uses information gathered in his or her clinical role to inform patients about trials for which they may be eligible and that clinician-researchers should adopt a model of preliminary consent to be approached about research prior to commencing a clinical (...)
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  37.  7
    Ignorance is Not Bliss: The Case for Comprehensive Reproductive Counseling for Women with Chronic Kidney Disease.Ana S. Iltis, Maya Mehta & Deirdre Sawinski - 2023 - HEC Forum 35 (3):223-236.
    The bioethics literature has paid little attention to matters of informed reproductive decision-making among women of childbearing age who have chronic kidney disease (CKD), including women who are on dialysis or women who have had a kidney transplant. Women with CKD receive inconsistent and, sometimes, inadequate reproductive counseling, particularly with respect to information about pursuing pregnancy. We identify four factors that might contribute to inadequate and inconsistent reproductive counseling. We argue that women with CKD should receive comprehensive reproductive counseling, including (...)
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  38.  20
    Placebo Controlled Trials: Restrictions, Not Prohibitions.Ana Smith Iltis - 2004 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 13 (4):380-393.
    The last two decades have witnessed intense debate over the ethical legitimacy of placebo controlled trials. Most of the arguments for and against the use of PCTs turn on one of the following issues: the compatibility of the obligations of clinicians and researchers with PCTs, the scientific merit of PCTs, and the influence of patients' and subjects' perceptions, ability to consent, expectations, and rights on the permissibility of PCTs. I introduce each of these categories and assess the principal arguments in (...)
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  39.  29
    Costs to Subjects for Research Participation and the Informed Consent Process: Regulatory and Ethical Considerations.Ana S. Iltis - 2004 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 26 (6):9.
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  40.  3
    At the Foundations of Bioethics and Biopolitics: Critical Essays on the Thought of H. Tristram Engelhardt, Jr.Mark J. Cherry, Ana Iltis & Lisa M. Rasmussen (eds.) - 2015 - Cham: Imprint: Springer.
    This volume brings together a set of critical essays on the thought of Professor Doctor H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr., Co-Founding Editor of the Philosophy and Medicine book series. Amongst the founders of bioethics, Professor Engelhardt, looms large. Many of his books and articles have appeared in multiple languages, including Italian, Romanian, Portuguese, Spanish, and Chinese. The essays in this book focus critically on a wide swath of his work, in the process elucidating, critiquing, and/or commending the rigor and reach of (...)
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  41.  26
    Editors' Note.James M. DuBois, Ana S. Iltis & Susan G. DuBois - 2012 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 2 (2):v-vi.
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  42.  3
    Editors' Note.James M. DuBois, Ana S. Iltis & Heidi A. Walsh - 2017 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 7 (2):v-v.
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  43.  7
    Editors’ Note.James M. DuBois, Ana S. Iltis & Heidi A. Walsh - 2017 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 7 (3):v-v.
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  44.  9
    Editors' Note.James M. DuBois, Ana S. Iltis & Heidi A. Walsh - 2018 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 8 (1):v-v.
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  45.  6
    Editors’ Note.James M. Dubois, Ana S. Iltis & Heidi A. Walsh - 2018 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 8 (2):v-vi.
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  46.  11
    Editors' Note.James M. DuBois, Ana S. Iltis & Heidi A. Walsh - 2018 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 8 (3):v-vi.
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  47.  14
    Editors’ Note.James M. DuBois, Ana S. Iltis & Heidi A. Walsh - 2019 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 9 (1):v-vi.
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  48.  7
    Editors’ Note.James M. DuBois, Ana S. Iltis & Heidi A. Walsh - 2019 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 9 (2):v-vi.
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  49.  7
    Editors' Note.James M. DuBois, Ana S. Iltis & Heidi A. Walsh - 2020 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 10 (1):v-vii.
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  50.  8
    Editors' Note.James M. DuBois, Ana S. Iltis & Heidi A. Walsh - 2020 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 10 (2):v-vi.
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