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  1.  44
    Cultural Crossvergence and Social Desirability Bias: Ethical Evaluations by Chinese and Canadian Business Students.Paul Dunn & Anamitra Shome - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (4):527-543.
    The purpose of this study is to determine whether there are cross-cultural differences between Chinese and Canadian business students with respect to their assessment of the ethicality of various business behaviors. Using a sample of 147 business students, the results indicate cultural crossvergence; the Chinese (72 students) and Canadians (75 students) exhibit different ethical attitudes toward questionable business practices at the individual level but not at the corporate level. A social desirability bias (a tendency to deny socially unacceptable actions and (...)
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  2.  29
    Machiavellianism in Public Accountants: Some Additional Canadian Evidence.Anamitra Shome & Hema Rao - 2009 - Business Ethics 18 (4):364-371.
    The current study surveys practising Canadian public accountants in Canada in both Big 4 and non-Big 4 firms to determine their orientation with respect to Machiavellianism, defined as 'attending to one's interests much more than to others'. Results indicate that while there are no significant differences in Machiavellianism between public accountants in the upper-level positions (managers and partners), partners are significantly less Machiavellian than seniors. These results are consistent with previous studies on Canadian public accountants.
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    Machiavellianism in Public Accountants: Some Additional Canadian Evidence.Anamitra Shome & Hema Rao - 2009 - Business Ethics: A European Review 18 (4):364-371.
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  4.  23
    Culture and Social Desirability Bias.Paul Dunn & Anamitra Shome - 2007 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 18:12-14.
    This study finds cultural divergence among business students from Canada and the People’s Republic of China. The Chinese and Canadian students, regardless of gender, exhibit different ethical attitudes towards questionable business practices. Also, the Canadian students, especially the women, demonstrate a stronger social desirability bias (a tendency to deny socially unacceptable actions and to admit to socially desirable ones) than do the Chinese business students. Finally, this bias causes respondents to increase their assessment of the un-ethicality of questionable business activities.
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