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  1.  60
    Genres in Dialogue: Plato and the Construct of Philosophy.Andrea Wilson Nightingale - 1995 - Cambridge University Press.
    This 1995 book takes as its starting point Plato's incorporation of specific genres of poetry and rhetoric into his dialogues. The author argues that Plato's 'dialogues' with traditional genres are part and parcel of his effort to define 'philosophy'. Before Plato, 'philosophy' designated 'intellectual cultivation' in the broadest sense. When Plato appropriated the term for his own intellectual project, he created a new and specialised discipline. In order to define and legitimise 'philosophy', Plato had to match it against genres of (...)
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  2.  20
    Spectacles of Truth in Classical Greek Philosophy: Theoria in its Cultural Context.Andrea Wilson Nightingale - 2004 - Cambridge University Press.
    In fourth-century Greece, the debate over the nature of philosophy generated a novel claim: that the highest form of wisdom is theoria, the rational 'vision' of metaphysical truths. This 2004 book offers an original analysis of the construction of 'theoretical' philosophy in fourth-century Greece. In the effort to conceptualise and legitimise theoretical philosophy, the philosophers turned to a venerable cultural practice: theoria. In this practice, an individual journeyed abroad as an official witness of sacralized spectacles. This book examines the philosophic (...)
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  3.  64
    Plato on the Origins of Evil: The Statesman Myth Reconsidered.Andrea Wilson Nightingale - 1996 - Ancient Philosophy 16 (1):65-91.
  4.  13
    Plato's "Gorgias" and Euripides' "Antiope": A Study in Generic Transformation.Andrea Wilson Nightingale - 1992 - Classical Antiquity 11 (1):121-141.
  5.  22
    Plato's Lawcode in Context: Rule by Written Law in Athens and Magnesia.Andrea Wilson Nightingale - 1999 - Classical Quarterly 49 (01):100-122.
    Perhaps more than any other dialogue, Plato's Laws demands a reading that is at once historical and philosophical. This text's conception of the ‘rule of law’ is best understood in its contemporary socio-political context; its philosophical discussion of this topic, in fact, can be firmly located in the political ideologies and institutions of fourth-century Greece. In this paper, I want to focus on the written lawcode created in the Laws in the context of the Athenian conception and practice of rule (...)
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  6.  33
    The Folly of Praise: Plato's Critique of Encomiastic Discourse in the Lysis and Symposium.Andrea Wilson Nightingale - 1993 - Classical Quarterly 43 (01):112-.
    Plato targets the encomiastic genre in three separate dialogues: the Lysis, the Menexenus and the Symposium. Many studies have been devoted to Plato's handling of the funeral oration in the Menexenus. Plato's critique of the encomium in the Lysis and Symposium, however, has not been accorded the same kind of treatment. Yet both of these dialogues go beyond the Menexenus in exploring the opposition between encomiastic and philosophic discourse. In the Lysis, I will argue, Plato sets up encomiastic rhetoric as (...)
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  7.  16
    Book Review: Genres in Dialogue: Plato and the Construct of Philosophy. [REVIEW]Andrea Wilson Nightingale - 1996 - Philosophy and Literature 20 (2).
  8.  12
    The Folly of Praise: Plato's Critique of Encomiastic Discourse in the Lysis and Symposium.Andrea Wilson Nightingale - 1993 - Classical Quarterly 43 (1):112-130.
    Plato targets the encomiastic genre in three separate dialogues: the Lysis, the Menexenus and the Symposium. Many studies have been devoted to Plato's handling of the funeral oration in the Menexenus. Plato's critique of the encomium in the Lysis and Symposium, however, has not been accorded the same kind of treatment. Yet both of these dialogues go beyond the Menexenus in exploring the opposition between encomiastic and philosophic discourse. In the Lysis, I will argue, Plato sets up encomiastic rhetoric as (...)
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