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Andreas T. Christiansen
University of Copenhagen
  1.  16
    Rationality, Expected Utility Theory and the Precautionary Principle.Andreas Christiansen - 2019 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 22 (1):3-20.
    ABSTRACTA common objection to the precautionary principle is that it is irrational. I argue that this objection goes beyond the often-discussed claim that the principle is incoherent. Instead, I argue, expected utility theory is the source of several more sophisticated irrationality charges against the precautionary principle. I then defend the principle from these objections by arguing that the relevant features of the precautionary principle are part of plausible normative theories, and that the precautionary principle does not diverge more from ideal (...)
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  2.  72
    Synthetic Biology and the Moral Significance of Artificial Life: A Reply to Douglas, Powell and Savulescu.Andreas Christiansen - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (5):372-379.
    I discuss the moral significance of artificial life within synthetic biology via a discussion of Douglas, Powell and Savulescu's paper 'Is the creation of artificial life morally significant’. I argue that the definitions of 'artificial life’ and of 'moral significance’ are too narrow. Douglas, Powell and Savulescu's definition of artificial life does not capture all core projects of synthetic biology or the ethical concerns that have been voiced, and their definition of moral significance fails to take into account the possibility (...)
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  3.  44
    Does Controversial Science Call For Public Participation? The Case Of Gmo Skepticism.Andreas Christiansen, Karin Jonch-Clausen & Klemens Kappel - 2017 - Les ateliers de l'éthique/The Ethics Forum 12 (1):26-50.
    Andreas Christiansen,Karin Jonch-Clausen,Klemens Kappel | : Many instances of new and emerging science and technology are controversial. Although a number of people, including scientific experts, welcome these developments, a considerable skepticism exists among members of the public. The use of genetically modified organisms is a case in point. In science policy and in science communication, it is widely assumed that such controversial science and technology require public participation in the policy-making process. We examine this view, which we call the Public (...)
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  4.  14
    Democratic Decision Making and the Psychology of Risk.Andreas Christiansen & Bjørn Hallsson - 2017 - Les Ateliers de l'Éthique / the Ethics Forum 12 (1):51-83.
    Andreas Christiansen,Bjørn Hallsson | : In many cases, the public want to restrict an activity or technology that they believe to be dangerous, but that scientific experts believe to be safe. There is thus a tension between respecting the preferences of the people and making policy based on our best scientific knowledge. Deciding how to make policy in the light of this tension requires an understanding of why citizens sometimes disagree with the experts on what is risky and what is (...)
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  5.  14
    On the Cognitive Argument for Cost-Benefit Analysis.Andreas Christiansen - 2018 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 21 (2):217-230.
    In a number of writings, Cass Sunstein has argued that we should use cost-benefit analysis as our primary approach to risk management, because cost-benefit analysis corrects for the cognitive biases that mar our thinking about risk. The paper critically evaluates this ‘cognitive argument for cost-benefit analysis’ and finds it wanting. Once we make distinctions between different cognitive errors and between different aspects of cost-benefit analysis, it becomes apparent that there are really two cognitive arguments, neither of which is successful as (...)
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  6.  38
    Similarity Arguments in the Genetic Modification Debate.Andreas Christiansen - 2017 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 20 (2):239-255.
    In the ethical debate on genetic modification, it is common to encounter the claim that some anti-GM argument would also apply an established, ethically accepted technology, and that the anti-GM argument is therefore unsuccessful. The paper discusses whether this argumentative strategy, the Similarity Argument, is sound. It presents a logically valid, generic form of the Similarity Argument and then shows that it is subject to three types of objection: It does not respect the difference between pro tanto reasons and all-things-considered (...)
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