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  1.  5
    Metaphor Scenarios in Public Discourse.Andreas Musolff - 2006 - Metaphor and Symbol 21 (1):23-38.
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  2.  21
    The “Legitimation” of Hostility Towards Immigrants’ Languages in Press and Social Media: Main Fallacies and How to Challenge Them.Andreas Musolff - 2018 - Lodz Papers in Pragmatics 14 (1):117-131.
    On the basis of internet forum and press media data, this article studies the expression of hostile attitudes towards multilingualism and multiculturalism in the context of debates about immigration. The forum data are drawn from the BBC’s Have Your Say website, which is a moderated forum that excludes polemical and abusive postings. Nevertheless, it still seems to provide its users ample opportunity for airing strongly anti-immigrant attitudes. The narratives in which these attitudes are being expressed are exemplary stories of the (...)
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  3.  20
    From Social to Biological Parasites and Back: The Conceptual Career of a Metaphor.Andreas Musolff - 2014 - Contributions to the History of Concepts 9 (2):18-32.
    The categorization of individuals or groups as social parasites has often been treated as an example of semantic transfer from the biological to the social domain. Historically, however, the scientific uses of the term parasite cannot be deemed to be primary, as their emergence in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries was preceded by a much older tradition of religious and social terminology. Its social use in modern times, on the other hand, builds on a secondary metaphorization from the scientific source (...)
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  4.  22
    Ignes Fatui or Apt Similitudes ?- the Apparent Denunciation of Metaphor by Thomas Hobbes1.Andreas Musolff - 2005 - Hobbes Studies 18 (1):96-112.
    Thomas Hobbes's condemnation of metaphor as one of the chief "abuses of speech" in Leviathan occupies a famous place in the history of thinking about metaphor. From the viewpoint of cognitive metaphor theory, George Lakoff and Mark Johnson have depicted Hobbes and John Locke as the founding fathers of a tradition in which "metaphor and other figurative devices [became] objects of scorn". Similar verdicts on Hobbes and on Locke as arch-detractors of metaphor can be found in many other accounts of (...)
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  5. Book Review: Andrew Goatly, Washing the Brain. Metaphor and Hidden Ideology. Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 2007. XVII + 431 Pp. [REVIEW]Andreas Musolff - 2008 - Discourse Studies 10 (5):698-701.
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  6.  8
    Modern Versions of Arminius. Winkler Arminius the Liberator. Myth and Ideology. Pp. XXIV + 356, Ills. New York: Oxford University Press, 2016. Cased, £47.99, Us$74. Isbn: 978-0-19-025291-5. [REVIEW]Andreas Musolff - 2017 - The Classical Review 67 (1):293-295.
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  7. Political Metaphor Analysis.Andreas Musolff - 2016
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  8.  13
    Researching and Applying Metaphor in the Real World, by Graham Low, Zazie Todd, Alice Deignan, & Lynne Cameron (Eds.). [REVIEW]Andreas Musolff - 2014 - Metaphor and Symbol 29 (2):144-146.
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  9.  19
    The Afterlife of an Infamous Gaffe.Andreas Musolff - 2018 - Pragmatics and Society 9 (1):75-90.
    Kaiser Wilhelm II’s speech to a German contingent of the international expedition corps, sent to quell the so-called ‘Boxer Rebellion’ in 1900, is today remembered chiefly as an example of his penchant for boastful, sabre-rattling rhetoric that included a strange comparison of his soldiers with the ‘Huns under Attila’. According to some accounts, this comparison was the source for the stigmatizing label Hun for Germans in British and US war propaganda in WW1 and WW2, which has survived in popular memory (...)
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  10.  11
    “You Keep Telling Us Different Things, What Do We Believe?”.Andreas Musolff - 2019 - Pragmatics and Society 10 (1):32-48.
    Quotation and reflective interpretation of previous statements are common features in police interviews. Of particular importance is the uncovering of apparent contradictions between earlier and current responses in interviews of suspects. Conflicting statements can be used by officers as triggers to elicit new responses that explain inconsistencies. In linguistic pragmatics, such reflective commenting on utterances is categorised as metacommunication, i.e. ‘communication about communication’, which includes metarepresentation, i.e. second-order representation of another representation through some form of quotation. Such instances of metacommunication (...)
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