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  1. Proving Quadratic Reciprocity.Andrew Boucher - manuscript
    These notes are meant to continue from the paper on Consistency, in proving number-theoretic theorems from the second-order arithmetical system called FFFF. Its ultimate target is Quadratic Reciprocity, although it introduces and proves some facts about the least common multiple at the start.
     
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  2. A Note On the Berry Paradox.Andrew Boucher - unknown
    For those who have understood the solution to the Liarʼs Paradox and the Paradoxes of Predication, presented in A Comprehensive Solution to the Paradoxes and The Solution to the Liarʼs Paradox1, it will come as no surprise how the Berry Paradox should be solved. Nonetheless, the solution will be presented here in a short note, for completenessʼ sake.
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  3. A Theory of Meaning.Andrew Boucher - unknown
    What an individual means by a word sometimes, if not always, is dependent on the individual, on what he believes, and on his memories; and so on what kind of life he has lived and what kind of experiences he has had, the manner in which he learned the word, and so forth. For instance, someone who lives in a hot climate will surely mean the word ʻcoldʼ in a different way than someone who comes from a cold one. Indeed (...)
     
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  4. The Solution to the Liar's Paradox.Andrew Boucher - manuscript
    A solution to the Liar must do two things. First, it should say exactly which step in the Liar reasoning - the reasoning which leads to a contradiction - is invalid. Secondly, it should explains why this step is invalid.
     
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  5. On Descriptive Ethics.Andrew Boucher - manuscript
    In its descriptive sense ethical language allows one to make assertions, which like other assertions may be true or not. “One should not torture,” descriptively, makes an assertion about torture - that it is an act that one should not do. While the peculiar force of ethical language comes from its overloading of different types of uses - descriptive, imperative, and emotive -, our concern here will be with the descriptive. Many of our assertions will focus on the English word (...)
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  6. Comments on Naming and Necessity.Andrew Boucher - manuscript
    I recently had the occasion to reread Naming and Necessity by Saul Kripke. NaN struck me this time, as it always has, as breathtakingly clear and lucid. It also struck me this time, as it always has, as wrong-headed in several major ways, both in its methodology and its content. Herein is a brief explanation why.
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  7. Proving Bertrand's Postulate.Andrew Boucher - manuscript
    Bertand's Postulate is proved in Peano Arithmetic minus the Successor Axiom.
     
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  8. Three Theorems of Godel.Andrew Boucher - manuscript
    It might seem that three of Godel’s results - the Completeness and the First and Second Incompleteness Theorems - assume so little that they are reasonably indisputable. A version of the Completeness Theorem, for instance, can be proven in RCA0, which is the weakest system studied extensively in Simpson’s encyclopaedic Subsystems of Second Order Arithmetic. And it often seems that the minimum requirements for a system just to express the Incompleteness Theorems are sufficient to prove them. However, it will be (...)
     
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  9. Sub-Theory of Peano Arithmetic.Andrew Boucher - unknown
    The system called F is essentially a sub-theory of Frege Arithmetic without the ad infinitum assumption that there is always a next number. In a series of papers (Systems for a Foundation of Arithmetic, True” Arithmetic Can Prove Its Own Consistency and Proving Quadratic Reciprocity) it was shown that F proves a large number of basic arithmetic truths, such as the Euclidean Algorithm, Unique Prime Factorization (i.e. the Fundamental Law of Arithmetic), and Quadratic Reciprocity, indeed a sizable amount of arithmetic. (...)
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  10. General Arithmetic.Andrew Boucher - manuscript
    General Arithmetic is the theory consisting of induction on a successor function. Normal arithmetic, say in the system called Peano Arithmetic, makes certain additional demands on the successor function. First, that it be total. Secondly, that it be one-to-one. And thirdly, that there be a first element which is not in its image. General Arithmetic abandons all of these further assumptions, yet is still able to prove many meaningful arithmetic truths, such as, most basically, Commutativity and Associativity of Addition and (...)
     
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  11. Depression in a One-Good Barter Economy.Andrew Boucher - unknown
    Consider a one-good economy where money is not used and only barter holds. As is traditional, the unique good can be exchanged for labor, which itself is used to produce the good; and there are capitalists, who own the means of production, who contract for the labor and keep whatever of the good is left from production after paying the workers. The only unusual feature of the economy is that the various economic agents can also make promises of future delivery (...)
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  12. Parallel Machines.Andrew Boucher - 1997 - Minds and Machines 7 (4):543-551.
    Because it is time-dependent, parallel computation is fundamentally different from sequential computation. Parallel programs are non-deterministic and are not effective procedures. Given the brain operates in parallel, this casts doubt on AI's attempt to make sequential computers intelligent.
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  13.  74
    The Existence of Numbers (Or: What is the Status of Arithmetic?).Andrew Boucher - manuscript
    I begin with a personal confession. Philosophical discussions of existence have always bored me. When they occur, my eyes glaze over and my attention falters. Basically ontological questions often seem best decided by banging on the table--rocks exist, fairies do not. Argument can appear long-winded and miss the point. Sometimes a quick distinction resolves any apparent difficulty. Does a falling tree in an earless forest make noise, ie does the noise exist? Well, if noise means that an ear must be (...)
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  14. A Comprehensive Solution to the Paradoxes.Andrew Boucher - manuscript
    A solution to the paradoxes has two sides: the philosophical and the technical. The paradoxes are, first and foremost, a philosophical problem. A philosophical solution must pinpoint the exact step where the reasoning that leads to contradiction is fallacious, and then explain why it is so.
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  15.  37
    Against Angels and the Fregean-Cantorian Theory of Number.Andrew Boucher - unknown
    How-many numbers, such as 2 and 1000, relate or are capable of expressing the size of a group or set. Both Cantor and Frege analyzed how-many number in terms of one-to-one correspondence between two sets. That is to say, one arrived at numbers by either abstracting from the concept of correspondence, in the case of Cantor, or by using it to provide an out-and-out definition, in the case of Frege.
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  16.  25
    Dedekind's Proof.Andrew Boucher - manuscript
    In "The Nature and Meaning of Numbers," Dedekind produces an original, quite remarkable proof for the holy grail in the foundations of elementary arithmetic, that there are an infinite number of things. It goes like this. [p, 64 in the Dover edition.] Consider the set S of things which can be objects of my thought. Define the function phi(s), which maps an element s of S to the thought that s can be an object of my thought. Then phi is (...)
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  17.  21
    Consistency and Existence.Andrew Boucher - manuscript
    On the one hand, first-order theories are able to assert the existence of objects. For instance, ZF set theory asserts the existence of objects called the power set, while Peano Arithmetic asserts the existence of zero. On the other hand, a first-order theory may or not be consistent: it is if and only if no contradiction is a theorem. Let us ask, What is the connection between consistency and existence?
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  18.  19
    A Philosophical Introduction to the Foundations of Elementary Arithmetic.Andrew Boucher - manuscript
    As it is currently used, "foundations of arithmetic" can be a misleading expression. It is not always, as the name might indicate, being used as a plural term meaning X = {x : x is a foundation of arithmetic}. Instead it has come to stand for a philosophico-logical domain of knowledge, concerned with axiom systems, structures, and analyses of arithmetic concepts. It is a bit as if "rock" had come to mean "geology." The conflation of subject matter and its study (...)
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  19.  15
    Logical Philosophy.Andrew Boucher - unknown
    Note to the reader: To avoid confusion and possible misinterpretations of the author's intentions, whenever a paragraph contains a definition or explication of how the author means the meaning of a word, asterisks have been placed after the paragraph number and before the word or words in question. The reader is warned that some words may be meant idiosyncratically.
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