20 found
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Andrew Courtwright [14]Andrew M. Courtwright [6]
  1.  10
    After the DNR: Surrogates Who Persist in Requesting Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.Ellen M. Robinson, Wendy Cadge, Angelika A. Zollfrank, M. Cornelia Cremens & Andrew M. Courtwright - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (1):10-19.
    Some health care organizations allow physicians to withhold cardiopulmonary resuscitation from a patient, despite patient or surrogate requests that it be provided, when they believe it will be more harmful than beneficial. Such cases usually involve patients with terminal diagnoses whose medical teams argue that aggressive treatments are medically inappropriate or likely to be harmful. Although there is state-to-state variability and a considerable judicial gray area about the conditions and mechanisms for refusals to perform CPR, medical teams typically follow a (...)
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  2.  8
    The Role of Religious Beliefs in Ethics Committee Consultations for Conflict Over Life-Sustaining Treatment.Julia I. Bandini, Andrew Courtwright, Angelika A. Zollfrank, Ellen M. Robinson & Wendy Cadge - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (6):353-358.
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  3.  25
    Stigmatization and Public Health Ethics.Andrew Courtwright - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (2):74-80.
    Encouraged by the success of smoking denormalization strategies as a tobacco-control measure, public health institutions are adopting a similar approach to other health behaviors. For example, a recent controversial ad campaign in New York explicitly aimed to denormalize HIV/AIDS amongst gay men. Authors such as Scott Burris have argued that efforts like this are tantamount to stigmatization and that such stigmatization is unethical because it is dehumanizing. Others have offered a limited endorsement of denormalization/stigmatization campaigns as being justified on consequentialist (...)
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  4.  27
    Ethics Committee Consultation Due to Conflict Over Life-Sustaining Treatment: A Sociodemographic Investigation.Andrew M. Courtwright, Frederic Romain, Ellen M. Robinson & Eric L. Krakauer - 2016 - Ajob Empirical Bioethics 7 (4):220-226.
  5.  5
    From Unregulated Practice to Credentialed Profession: Implementing Ethics Consultation Competencies.Andrew Courtwright - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (2):16-17.
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  6.  11
    Shared Health Governance and the Problem of Stability.Andrew Courtwright - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (7):47 - 49.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 7, Page 47-49, July 2011.
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  7.  44
    Justice, Stigma, and the New Epidemiology of Health Disparities.Andrew M. Courtwright - 2009 - Bioethics 23 (2):90-96.
    Recent research in epidemiology has identified a number of factors beyond access to medical care that contribute to health disparities. Among the so-called socioeconomic determinants of health are income, education, and the distribution of social capital. One factor that has been overlooked in this discussion is the effect that stigmatization can have on health. In this paper, I identify two ways that social stigma can create health disparities: directly by impacting health-care seeking behaviour and indirectly through the internalization of negative (...)
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  8.  10
    Who Is “Too Sick to Benefit”?Andrew Courtwright - 2012 - Hastings Center Report 42 (4):41-47.
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  9.  49
    Justice, Health, and Status.Andrew M. Courtwright - 2007 - Theoria 54 (112):1-24.
    Philosophical and political discussions of health inequalities have largely focused on questions of justice. The general strategy employed by philosophers like Norman Daniels is to identify a certain state of affairs—in his case, equality of opportunity—and then argue that health disparities limiting an individual's or group's access to that condition are unjust, demanding intervention. Recent work in epidemiology, however, has highlighted the importance of socioeconomic status in creating health inequalities. I explore the ways in which theories of justice have been (...)
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  10.  18
    The Social Determinants of Health: Moving Beyond Justice.Andrew Courtwright - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (10):16 – 17.
  11.  11
    Health Disparities and Autonomy.Andrew Courtwright - 2008 - Bioethics 22 (8):431-439.
    Disparities in socioeconomic status correlate closely with health, so that the lower a person's social position, the worse his health, an effect that the epidemiologist Michael Marmot has labeled the status syndrome. Marmot has argued that differences in autonomy, understood in terms of control, underlie the status syndrome. He has, therefore, recommended that the American medical profession champion policies that improve patient autonomy. In this paper, I clarify the kind of control Marmot sees as connecting differences in socioeconomic status to (...)
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  12.  14
    Can I Trust Them to Do Everything? The Role of Distrust in Ethics Committee Consultations for Conflict Over Life-Sustaining Treatment Among Afro-Caribbean Patients.Frederic Romain & Andrew Courtwright - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (9):582-585.
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  13.  2
    Healthcare Provider Limitation of Life-Sustaining Treatment Without Patient or Surrogate Consent.Andrew Courtwright & Emily Rubin - 2017 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 45 (3):442-451.
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  14.  1
    Listening to, Respecting, and Treating Patients With Psychogenic Nonepileptic Seizures.Joel Salinas & Andrew Courtwright - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 4 (3):37-38.
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  15.  11
    The Changing Composition of a Hospital Ethics Committee: A Tertiary Care Center's Experience. [REVIEW]Andrew Courtwright, Sharon Brackett, Alexandra Cist, M. Cornelia Cremens, Eric L. Krakauer & Ellen M. Robinson - 2014 - HEC Forum 26 (1):59-68.
    A growing body of research has demonstrated significant heterogeneity of hospital ethics committee (HEC) size, membership and training requirements, length of appointment, institutional support, clinical and policy roles, and predictors of self identified success. Because these studies have focused on HECs at a single point in time, however, little is known about how the composition of HECs changes over time and what impact these changes have on committee utilization. The current study presents 20 years of data on the evolution of (...)
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  16.  3
    Justice, Health, and Status.Andrew Courtwright - 2007 - Theoria 54:1-24.
    Philosophical and political discussions of health inequalities have largely focused on questions of justice. The general strategy employed by philosophers like Norman Daniels is to identify a certain state of affairs—in his case, equality of opportunity—and then argue that health disparities limiting an individual's or group's access to that condition are unjust, demanding intervention. Recent work in epidemiology, however, has highlighted the importance of socioeconomic status in creating health inequalities. I explore the ways in which theories of justice have been (...)
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  17.  7
    Benjamin E. Berkman is a Faculty.Andrew Courtwright - forthcoming - Hastings Center Report.
  18.  5
    Who Should Decide for the Unrepresented?Andrew Courtwright & Emily Rubin - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (3):173-180.
    Unrepresented patients lack the capacity to make medical decisions for themselves, have no clear documentation of preferences for medical treatment, and have no surrogate decision maker or obvious candidate for that role. There is no consensus about who should serve as the decision maker for these patients, particularly regarding whether to continue or to limit life-sustaining treatment. Several authors have argued that ethics committees should play this role rather than the patient's treating physician, a common current default. We argue that (...)
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  19.  1
    The Role of a Hospital Ethics Consultation Service in Decision-Making for Unrepresented Patients.Andrew M. Courtwright, Joshua Abrams & Ellen M. Robinson - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (2):241-250.
    Despite increased calls for hospital ethics committees to serve as default decision-makers about life-sustaining treatment for unrepresented patients who lack decision-making capacity or a surrogate decision-maker and whose wishes regarding medical care are not known, little is known about how committees currently function in these cases. This was a retrospective cohort study of all ethics committee consultations involving decision-making about LST for unrepresented patients at a large academic hospital from 2007 to 2013. There were 310 ethics committee consultations, twenty-five of (...)
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  20. An Ethical Framework for the Care of Patients with Prolonged Hospitalization Following Lung Transplantation.Andrew M. Courtwright, Emily Rubin, Ellen M. Robinson, Souheil El-Chemaly, Daniela Lamas, Joshua M. Diamond & Hilary J. Goldberg - forthcoming - HEC Forum:1-14.
    The lung allocation score system in the United States and several European countries gives more weight to risk of death without transplantation than to survival following transplantation. As a result, centers transplant sicker patients, leading to increased length of initial hospitalization. The care of patients who have accumulated functional deficits or additional organ dysfunction during their prolonged stay can be ethically complex. Disagreement occurs between the transplant team, patients and families, and non-transplant health care professionals over the burdens of ongoing (...)
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