Results for 'Andrew Cullison Neil Feit'

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  1.  17
    When Does Falsehood Preclude Knowledge?Andrew Cullison Neil Feit - 2011 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 92 (3):283-304.
    Falsehood can preclude knowledge in many ways. A false proposition cannot be known. A false ground can prevent knowledge of a truth, or so we argue, but not every false ground deprives its subject of knowledge. A falsehood that is not a ground for belief can also prevent knowledge of a truth. This paper provides a systematic account of just when falsehood precludes knowledge, and hence when it does not. We present the paper as an approach to the Gettier problem (...)
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  2. When does falsehood preclude knowledge?Neil Feit & Andrew Cullison - 2011 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 92 (3):283-304.
    Falsehood can preclude knowledge in many ways. A false proposition cannot be known. A false ground can prevent knowledge of a truth, or so we argue, but not every false ground deprives its subject of knowledge. A falsehood that is not a ground for belief can also prevent knowledge of a truth. This paper provides a systematic account of just when falsehood precludes knowledge, and hence when it does not. We present the paper as an approach to the Gettier problem (...)
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  3.  14
    Objecting to the 'Doesn‘t Justify the Denial of a Defeater‘ Theory of Knowledge: A Reply to Feit and Cullison.Timothy Kirschenheiter - 2022 - Logos and Episteme 13 (4):407-415.
    In this paper, I explain Neil Feit and Andrew Cullison‘s two proposed theories of knowledge, their initial No Essential Falsehood-Justifying Grounds account and their ultimate 'Doesn‘t Justify the Denial of a Defeater‘ account. I then offer original counterexamples against both of these theories. In the process of doing so, I both explain Feit and Cullison‘s motivation for jointly offering their theories and recount counterexamples that others have offered against various theories that assert that knowledge (...)
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  4.  99
    Latent Profile Analysis of Schizotypy and Paranormal Belief: Associations with Probabilistic Reasoning Performance.Andrew Denovan, Neil Dagnall, Kenneth Drinkwater & Andrew Parker - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
  5. An Assessment of the Dimensionality and Factorial Structure of the Revised Paranormal Belief Scale.Kenneth Drinkwater, Andrew Denovan, Neil Dagnall & Andrew Parker - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
  6. Perception of Risk and Terrorism-Related Behavior Change: Dual Influences of Probabilistic Reasoning and Reality Testing.Andrew Denovan, Neil Dagnall, Kenneth Drinkwater, Andrew Parker & Peter Clough - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8:285709.
    The present study assessed the degree to which probabilistic reasoning performance and thinking style influenced perception of risk and self-reported levels of terrorism-related behaviour change. A sample of 263 respondents, recruited via convenience sampling, completed a series of measures comprising probabilistic reasoning tasks (perception of randomness, base rate, probability, and conjunction fallacy), the Reality Testing subscale of the Inventory of Personality Organization (IPO-RT), the Domain-Specific Risk-Taking Scale, and a terrorism-related behaviour change scale. Structural equation modelling examined three progressive models. Firstly, (...)
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  7.  19
    Executive dysfunction in psychosis following traumatic brain injury.Batty Rachel, Francis Andrew, Thomas Neil, Hopwood Malcolm, Ponsford Jennie & Rossell Susan - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  8.  11
    Who jumps to conclusions? A comprehensive assessment of probabilistic reasoning in psychosis following traumatic brain injury (PFTBI).Batty Rachel, Francis Andrew, Thomas Neil, Hopwood Malcolm, Ponsford Jennie & Rossell Susan - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  9.  21
    The Australian Sheep-Goat Scale: An Evaluation of Factor Structure and Convergent Validity.Kenneth Drinkwater, Andrew Denovan, Neil Dagnall & Andrew Parker - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
  10.  19
    Political attitudes in social environments.Andrew Gelman & Neil Gross - 2015 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38.
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  11.  2
    Development and Evaluation of the Chronic Time Pressure Inventory.Andrew Denovan & Neil Dagnall - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  12.  23
    Eye-closure & the retrieval of item-specific information in recognition memory.Andrew Parker & Neil Dagnall - 2020 - Consciousness and Cognition 77:102858.
  13.  68
    A defence of the no-minimum response to the problem of evil: Andrew cullison.Andrew Cullison - 2011 - Religious Studies 47 (1):121-123.
    I defend Peter van Inwagen's no-minimum response to the problem of evil from a recent objection raised by Jeff Jordan.
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  14. Infallibilism and Gettier's legacy. Daniel, Frances Howard-Snyder & Neil Feit - 2003 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 66 (2):304-327.
    Infallibilism is the view that a belief cannot be at once warranted and false. In this essay we assess three nonpartisan arguments for infallibilism, arguments that do not depend on a prior commitment to some substantive theory of warrant. Three premises, one from each argument, are most significant: if a belief can be at once warranted and false, then the Gettier Problem cannot be solved; if a belief can be at once warranted and false, then its warrant can be transferred (...)
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  15. Moral Perception.Andrew Cullison - 2010 - European Journal of Philosophy 18 (2):159-175.
    In this paper, I defend the view that we can have perceptual moral knowledge. First, I motivate the moral perception view by drawing on some examples involving perceptual knowledge of complex non‐moral properties. I argue that we have little reason to think that perception of moral properties couldn't operate in much the same way that our perception of these complex non‐moral properties operates. I then defend the moral perception view from two challenging objections that have yet to be adequately addressed. (...)
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  16. Attitudes De Se: Linguistics, Epistemology, Metaphysics.Neil Feit & Alessandro Capone (eds.) - 2013 - CSLI Publications.
    In English, we use the word "I" to express thoughts that we have about ourselves, and we use the reflexive pronouns "himself" and "herself" to attribute such thoughts to others. Philosophers and linguists call such thoughts, and the statements we use to express them, de se. De se thoughts and statements, although they appear often in our day-to-day lives, pose a series of challenging problems for both linguists and philosophers. This interdisciplinary volume examines the structure of de se thought, various (...)
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  17. What are seemings?Andrew Cullison - 2010 - Ratio 23 (3):260-274.
    We are all familiar with the phenomenon of a proposition seeming true. Many think that these seeming states can yield justified beliefs. Very few have seriously explored what these seeming states are. I argue that seeming states are not plausibly analyzed in terms of beliefs, partial beliefs, attractions to believe, or inclinations to believe. Given that the main candidates for analyzing seeming states are unsatisfactory, I argue for a brute view of seemings that treats seeming states as irreducible propositional attitudes.
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  18. Two solutions to the problem of divine hiddenness.Andrew Cullison - 2010 - American Philosophical Quarterly 47 (2):119 - 134.
    J. L. Schellenberg's argument from hiddenness against the existence of God is simple. The primary argument is as follows.The Main Argument from Hiddenness If God exists, then no one would be epistemically rational for not believing in God. Some people are epistemically rational for not believing in God. Therefore, God does not exist.However, much of the issue concerning this argument surrounds the support for premise. As many have noted, Schellenberg's first premise does not demand an undeniable, incontrovertible proof for God's (...)
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  19.  64
    Seemings and Semantics.Andrew Cullison - 2013 - In Chris Tucker (ed.), Seemings and Justification: New Essays on Dogmatism and Phenomenal Conservatism. New York: Oxford University Press USA. pp. 33.
  20. Plural Harm.Neil Feit - 2013 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 90 (2):361-388.
    In this paper, I construct and defend an account of harm, specifically, all-things-considered overall harm. I start with a simple comparative account, on which an event harms a person provided that she would have been better off had it not occurred. The most significant problems for this account are overdetermination and preemption cases. However, a counterfactual comparative approach of some sort is needed to make sense of harm, or so I argue. I offer a counterfactual comparative theory that accounts nicely (...)
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  21. Comparative Harm, Creation and Death.Neil Feit - 2016 - Utilitas 28 (2):136-163.
    Given that a person's death is bad for her,whenis it bad? I defendsubsequentism, the view that things that are bad in the relevant way are bad after they occur. Some have objected to this view on the grounds that it requires us to compare the amount of well-being the victim would have enjoyed, had she not died, with the amount she receives while dead; however, we cannot assign any level of well-being, not even zero, to a dead person. In the (...)
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  22. On the Nature of Testimony.Andrew Cullison - 2010 - Episteme 7 (2):114-127.
    This paper examines several recent positions on the nature of testimony and argues that all are unsatisfactory. The first section argues against narrow, broad, and moderate views. The second section argues against Jennifer Lackey's recent analysis of testimony. Her position is supposed to avoid the problems of the prior accounts, but still suffers from two problems. After discussing those problems, this paper offers and defends an alternative analysis of testimony.
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  23. Belief about the self: a defense of the property theory of content.Neil Feit - 2008 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Mental content and the problem of De Se belief -- Cognitive attitudes and content -- The doctrine of propositions -- The problem of De Se belief -- The property theory of content -- In favor of the property theory -- Perry's messy shopper and the argument from explanation -- Lewis's case of the two Gods -- Arguments from internalism and physicalism -- An inference to the best explanation -- Alternatives to the property theory -- The triadic view of belief -- (...)
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  24.  88
    Harming by Failing to Benefit.Neil Feit - 2017 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 22 (4):809-823.
    In this paper, I consider the problem of omission for the counterfactual comparative account of harm. A given event harms a person, on this account, when it makes her worse off than she would have been if it had not occurred. The problem arises because cases in which one person merely fails to benefit another intuitively seem harmless. The account, however, seems to imply that when one person fails to benefit another, the first thereby harms the second, since the second (...)
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  25.  22
    How Harms Can Be Better than Benefits: Reply to Carlson, Johansson, and Risberg.Neil Feit - 2022 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 100 (3):628-633.
    I respond here to an argument given recently in this journal by Erik Carlson, Jens Johansson, and Olle Risberg. The authors object to the counterfactual comparative account of harm. They argue that, on this account, an action that would harm the agent might leave her better off than would some alternative action that would benefit her, and they object to this implication. By appealing to group or plural harm, I argue that their objection fails.
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  26.  6
    Belief About the Self: A Defense of the Property Theory of Content.Neil Feit - 2008 - New York, US: Oxford University Press.
    This book offers a defense of the Property Theory of Content, according to which properties rather than propositions are the contents of our beliefs, desires, and other cognitive attitudes. New arguments for the theory are offered, objections are answered, and applications to problems in the philosophy of mind are discussed.
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  27.  46
    Omniscience as a Dispositional State.Andrew Cullison - 2006 - Philosophia Christi 8 (1):151-160.
  28. The Time of Death’s Misfortune.Neil Feit - 2002 - Noûs 36 (3):359–383.
  29. Descriptivism, scope, and apparently empty names.Andrew Cullison & Ben Caplan - 2011 - Philosophical Studies 156 (2):283-288.
    Some descriptivists reply to the modal argument by appealing to scope ambiguities. In this paper, we argue that those replies don’t work in the case of apparently empty names like ‘Sherlock Holmes’.
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  30.  33
    Harm and the concept of medical disorder.Neil Feit - 2017 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 38 (5):367-385.
    According to Jerome Wakefield’s harmful dysfunction analysis of medical disorder, the inability of some internal part or mechanism to perform its natural function is necessary, but not sufficient, for disorder. HDA also requires that the part dysfunction be harmful to the individual. I consider several problems for HDA’s harm criterion in this article. Other accounts on which harm is necessary for disorder will suffer from all or almost all of these problems. Comparative accounts of harm imply that one is harmed (...)
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  31.  18
    Medical disorder, harm, and damage.Neil Feit - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (1):39-52.
    Jerome Wakefield’s harmful dysfunction analysis of medical disorder is an influential hybrid of naturalist and normative theories. In order to conclude that a condition is a disorder, according to the HDA, one must determine both that it results from a failure of a physical or psychological mechanism to perform its natural function and that it is harmful. In a recent issue of this journal, I argued that the HDA entails implausible judgments about which disorders there are and how they are (...)
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  32.  19
    The Continuum Companion to Epistemology.Andrew Cullison (ed.) - 2012 - New York: Continuum.
    A one volume reference guide to the latest research and future directions in Epistemology, featuring chapters written by leading scholars in the field.
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  33. Conspiracy theory and cognitive style: a worldview.Neil Dagnall, Kenneth Drinkwater, Andrew Parker, Andrew Denovan & Megan Parton - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6:128279.
    This paper assessed whether belief in conspiracy theories was associated with a particularly cognitive style (worldview). The sample comprised 223 volunteers recruited via convenience sampling and included undergraduates, postgraduates, university employees and alumni. Respondents completed measures assessing a range of cognitive-perceptual factors (schizotypy, delusional ideation and hallucination proneness) and conspiratorial beliefs (general attitudes towards conspiracist thinking and endorsement of individual conspiracies). Positive symptoms of schizotypy, particularly the cognitive-perceptual factor, correlated positively with conspiracist beliefs. The best predictor of belief in conspiracies (...)
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  34. Urban Legends and Paranormal Beliefs: The Role of Reality Testing and Schizotypy.Neil Dagnall, Andrew Denovan, Kenneth Drinkwater, Andrew Parker & Peter J. Clough - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
  35. Privileged access, externalism, and ways of believing.Andrew Cullison - 2007 - Philosophical Studies 136 (3):305-318.
    By exploiting a concept called ways of believing, I offer a plausible reformulation of the doctrine of privileged access. This reformulation will provide us with a defense of compatibilism, the view that content externalism and privileged access are compatible.
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  36. Variations in Well-Being as a Function of Paranormal Belief and Psychopathological Symptoms: A Latent Profile Analysis.Neil Dagnall, Andrew Denovan & Kenneth Graham Drinkwater - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    This study examined variations in well-being as a function of the interaction between paranormal belief and psychopathology-related constructs. A United Kingdom-based, general sample of 4,402 respondents completed self-report measures assessing paranormal belief, psychopathology, and well-being. Latent profile analysis identified four distinct sub-groups: Profile 1, high Paranormal Belief and Psychopathology ; Profile 2, high Paranormal Belief and Unusual Experiences; moderate Psychopathology ; Profile 3, moderate Paranormal Belief and Psychopathology ; and Profile 4, low Paranormal Belief and Psychopathology. Multivariate analysis of variance (...)
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  37. The Problem of De Se Attitudes: An Introduction to the Issues and the Essays.Neil Feit & Alessandro Capone - 2013 - In Neil Feit & Alessandro Capone (eds.), Attitudes De Se: Linguistics, Epistemology, Metaphysics. CSLI Publications. pp. 1-25.
  38. Three Millian Ways to Resolve Open Questions.Andrew Cullison - 2008 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 3 (1):1-17.
    Millianism is a thesis in philosophy of language that the meaning of a proper name is simply its referent. Millianism faces certain puzzles called Frege's Puzzles. Some Millians defend the view by appealing to a metaphysics of belief that involves Ways of Believing. In the first part of this paper, I argue that ethical naturalists can adopt this Millian strategy to resist Moore’s Open Question argument. While this strategy of responding to the Open Question Argument has already appeared in the (...)
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  39.  37
    Explaining the Geometry of Desert.Neil Feit & Stephen Kershnar - 2004 - Public Affairs Quarterly 18 (4):273-298.
    In the past decade, three philosophers in particular have recently explored the relation between desert and intrinsic value. Fred Feldman argues that consequentialism need not give much weight – or indeed any weight at all – to the happiness of persons who undeservedly experience pleasure. He defends the claim that the intrinsic value of a state of affairs is determined by the “fit” between the amount of well-being that a person receives and the amount of well-being that the person deserves. (...)
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  40. Explaining the Geometry of Desert.Neil Feit & Stephen Kershnar - 2004 - Public Affairs Quarterly 18:273.
    In the past decade, three philosophers in particular have recently explored the relation between desert and intrinsic value. Fred Feldman argues that consequentialism need not give much weight – or indeed any weight at all – to the happiness of persons who undeservedly experience pleasure. He defends the claim that the intrinsic value of a state of affairs is determined by the “fit” between the amount of well-being that a person receives and the amount of well-being that the person deserves. (...)
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  41. Seeming and semantics.Andrew Cullison - 2013 - In Chris Tucker (ed.), Seemings and Justification: New Essays on Dogmatism and Phenomenal Conservatism. New York: Oxford University Press USA. pp. 33–51.
     
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  42. Seeming and semantics.Andrew Cullison - 2013 - In Chris Tucker (ed.), Seemings and Justification: New Essays on Dogmatism and Phenomenal Conservatism. New York: Oxford University Press USA. pp. 33–51.
     
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  43. A Companion to Epistemology.Andrew Cullison (ed.) - 2010 - New York: Continuum Press.
    The Continuum Companion to Epistemology offers the definitive guide to a key area of contemporary philosophy. The book covers all the fundamental questions asked by epistemology - areas that have continued to attract interest historically as well as topics that have emerged more recently as active areas of research. Sixteen specially commissioned essays from an international team of experts reveal where important work continues to be done in the area and, most valuably, the exciting new directions the field is taking. (...)
     
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  44. Introduction. Epistemology : a brief historical overview and some puzzles about methodology.Andrew Cullison - 2012 - In The Continuum Companion to Epistemology. Continuum.
     
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  45.  50
    Lackey J. – critical review of learning from words.Andrew Cullison - 2012 - Analytic Philosophy 53 (2):249-267.
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  46. Rationality and Puzzling Beliefs.Neil Feit - 2001 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 63 (1):29-55.
    The author presents and defends a general view about belief, and certain attributions of belief, with the intention of providing a solution to Saul Kripke's puzzle about belief. According to the position developed in the paper, there are two senses in which one could be said to have contradictory beliefs. Just one of these senses threatens the rationality of the believer; but Kripke's puzzle concerns only the other one. The general solution is then extended to certain variants of Kripke's original (...)
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  47.  14
    Audi, Robert. Moral Perception.Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2013. Pp. 200. $35.00.Andrew Cullison - 2015 - Ethics 125 (4):1189-1194.
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  48. Belief Reports and the Property Theory of Content.Neil Feit - 2013 - In Neil Feit & Alessandro Capone (eds.), Attitudes De Se: Linguistics, Epistemology, Metaphysics. CSLI Publications. pp. 105-31.
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  49. Self-ascription and belief de re.Neil Feit - 2000 - Philosophical Studies 98 (1):35-49.
  50.  9
    Toward a Better Understanding of the Relationship between Belief in the Paranormal and Statistical Bias: The Potential Role of Schizotypy.Neil Dagnall, Andrew Denovan, Kenneth Drinkwater, Andrew Parker & Peter Clough - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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