Results for 'Andrew D. Schreiner'

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  1.  29
    Chaos to Complexity: Leveling the Playing Field for Measuring Value in Primary Care.William P. Moran, Jingwen Zhang, Mulugeta Gebregziabher, Elisha L. Brownfield, Kimberly S. Davis, Andrew D. Schreiner, Brent M. Egan, Raymond S. Greenberg, T. Rogers Kyle, Justin E. Marsden, Sarah J. Ball & Patrick D. Mauldin - 2017 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 23 (2):430-438.
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  2.  43
    Patrick Henry, Edwin Stein, Gabriele Poole, Richard Rumana, Gerald Prince, Tom Conley, Richard D. Lord, G. Mallary Masters, William E. Cain, Karsten Harries, Robert D. Cottrell, David Halliburton, Colette Gaudin, Virginia A. La Charité, Jeff Mitchell, John Goodliffe, Kerry S. Walters, Thomas Reinert, Dana R. Smith, Michael L. Hall, Christopher McClintick, Julie Van Camp, Warren Ginsberg, Steven Rendall, Donald Pizer, Jean A. Perkins, Roberta Davidson, Christopher Perricone, Peter J. Rabinowitz, Andrew J. McKenna, C. S. Schreiner, Anthony Roda, and Juniper Ellis. [REVIEW]Wendell V. Harris - 1995 - Philosophy and Literature 19 (1):136.
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  3.  38
    Ideas: General Introduction to Pure Phenomenology.Andrew D. Osborn - 1932 - Journal of Philosophy 29 (6):163-167.
  4. Functions in Basic Formal Ontology.Andrew D. Spear, Werner Ceusters & Barry Smith - 2016 - Applied ontology 11 (2):103-128.
    The notion of function is indispensable to our understanding of distinctions such as that between being broken and being in working order (for artifacts) and between being diseased and being healthy (for organisms). A clear account of the ontology of functions and functioning is thus an important desideratum for any top-level ontology intended for application to domains such as engineering or medicine. The benefit of using top-level ontologies in applied ontology can only be realized when each of the categories identified (...)
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  5.  19
    Embodied Cognition is Not What You Think It Is.Andrew D. Wilson & Sabrina Golonka - 2013 - Frontiers in Psychology 4.
  6.  57
    Gaslighting, Confabulation, and Epistemic Innocence.Andrew D. Spear - 2020 - Topoi 39 (1):229-241.
    Recent literature on epistemic innocence develops the idea that a defective cognitive process may nevertheless merit special consideration insofar as it confers an epistemic benefit that would not otherwise be available. For example, confabulation may be epistemically innocent when it makes a subject more likely to form future true beliefs or helps her maintain a coherent self-concept. I consider the role of confabulation in typical cases of interpersonal gaslighting, and argue that confabulation will not be epistemically innocent in such cases (...)
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  7. Epistemic Dimensions of Gaslighting: Peer-Disagreement, Self-Trust, and Epistemic Injustice.Andrew D. Spear - 2018 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy:1-24.
    ABSTRACTMiranda Fricker has characterized epistemic injustice as “a kind of injustice in which someone is wronged specifically in her capacity as a knower” (2007, Epistemic injustice: Power & the e...
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  8. The Epistemic Regress Problem.Andrew D. Cling - 2008 - Philosophical Studies 140 (3):401 - 421.
    The best extant statement of the epistemic regress problem makes assumptions that are too strong. An improved version assumes only that that reasons require support, that no proposition is supported only by endless regresses of reasons, and that some proposition is supported. These assumptions are individually plausible but jointly inconsistent. Attempts to explain support by means of unconceptualized sensations, contextually immunized propositions, endless regresses, and holistic coherence all require either additional reasons or an external condition on support that is arbitrary (...)
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  9. The Trouble with Infinitism.Andrew D. Cling - 2004 - Synthese 138 (1):101 - 123.
    One way to solve the epistemic regress problem would be to show that we can acquire justification by means of an infinite regress. This is infinitism. This view has not been popular, but Peter Klein has developed a sophisticated version of infinitism according to which all justified beliefs depend upon an infinite regress of reasons. Klein's argument for infinitism is unpersuasive, but he successfully responds to the most compelling extant objections to the view. A key component of his position is (...)
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  10.  45
    Extended Modal Realism — a New Solution to the Problem of Intentional Inexistence.Andrew D. Thomas - 2020 - Philosophia 48 (3):1197-1208.
    Kriegel described the problem of intentional inexistence as one of the ‘perennial problems of philosophy’, 307–340, 2007: 307). In the same paper, Kriegel alluded to a modal realist solution to the problem of intentional inexistence. However, Kriegel does not state by name who defends the kind of modal realist solution he has in mind. Kriegel also points out that even what he believes to be the strongest version of modal realism does not pass the ‘principle of representation’ and thus modal (...)
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  11.  90
    Global Health Ethics for Students.Andrew D. Pinto & Ross E. G. Upshur - 2009 - Developing World Bioethics 9 (1):1-10.
    As a result of increased interest in global health, more and more medical students and trainees from the.
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  12.  9
    Gaslighting, Confabulation, and Epistemic Innocence.Andrew D. Spear - 2020 - Topoi 39 (1):229-241.
    Recent literature on epistemic innocence develops the idea that a defective cognitive process may nevertheless merit special consideration insofar as it confers an epistemic benefit that would not otherwise be available. For example, confabulation may be epistemically innocent when it makes a subject more likely to form future true beliefs or helps her maintain a coherent self-concept. I consider the role of confabulation in typical cases of interpersonal gaslighting, and argue that confabulation will not be epistemically innocent in such cases (...)
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  13. The Epistemic Regress Problem, the Problem of the Criterion, and the Value of Reasons.Andrew D. Cling - 2014 - Metaphilosophy 45 (2):161-171.
    There are important similarities between the epistemic regress problem and the problem of the criterion. Each turns on plausible principles stating that epistemic reasons must be supported by epistemic reasons but that having reasons is impossible if that requires having endless regresses of reasons. These principles are incompatible with the possibility of reasons, so each problem is a paradox. Whether there can be an antiskeptical solution to these paradoxes depends upon the kinds of reasons that we need in order to (...)
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  14.  79
    Justification-Affording Circular Arguments.Andrew D. Cling - 2002 - Philosophical Studies 111 (3):251 - 275.
    An argument whose conclusion C is essential evidence for one of its premises can provide its target audience with justification for believing C. This is possible because we can enhance our justification for believing a proposition C by integrating it into an explanatory network of beliefs for which C itself provides essential evidence. I argue for this in light of relevant features of doxastic circularity, epistemic circularity, and explanatory inferences. Finally, I confirm my argument with an example and respond to (...)
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  15.  88
    Posing the Problem of the Criterion.Andrew D. Cling - 1994 - Philosophical Studies 75 (3):261 - 292.
    Although it has been largely neglected in contemporary philosophy , the problem of the criterion raises questions which must be addressed by any complete account of knowledge . But the problem of the criterion suffers not onl.
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  16.  22
    Harmless Naturalism: The Limits of Science and the Nature of Philosophy.Andrew D. Cling - 1998 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 62 (2):493-495.
  17.  74
    Epistemic Levels and the Problem of the Criterion.Andrew D. Cling - 1997 - Philosophical Studies 88 (2):109-140.
    The problem of the criterion says that we can know a proposition only if we first know a criterion of truth and vice versa, hence, we cannot know any proposition or any criterion of truth. The epistemic levels response says that since knowledge does not require knowledge about knowledge, we can know a proposition without knowing a criterion of truth. This response (advocated by Chisholm and Van Cleve) presupposes that criteria of truth are epistemic principles. In general, however, criteria of (...)
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  18.  10
    Face, Eye, and Body Selective Responses in Fusiform Gyrus and Adjacent Cortex: An Intracranial EEG Study.Andrew D. Engell & Gregory McCarthy - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  19.  62
    Autonomy, Liberalism and State Neutrality.Andrew D. Mason - 1990 - Philosophical Quarterly 40 (161):433-452.
  20.  61
    Frege on Number Properties.Andrew D. Irvine - 2010 - Studia Logica 96 (2):239-260.
    In the Grundlagen , Frege offers eight main arguments, together with a series of more minor supporting arguments, against Mill’s view that numbers are “properties of external things”. This paper reviews all eight of these arguments, arguing that none are conclusive.
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  21.  60
    The Revisionist Difference Principle.Andrew D. Williams - 1995 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 25 (2):257 - 281.
    John Rawls's famous difference principle is capable of at least four distinct statements, each of which occurs in A Theory of Justice. According to what I shall term the Crude Principle it is a necessary and sufficient condition for the justice of an institutional scheme which expands social and economic inequality that, subject to the satisfaction of more weighty principles, it increases the level of advantage of the least advantaged. Expressing this principle Rawls writes that,Assuming the framework of institutions required (...)
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  22.  92
    Eliminative Materialism and Self-Referential Inconsistency.Andrew D. Cling - 1989 - Philosophical Studies 56 (May):53-75.
  23.  90
    Self-Supporting Arguments.Andrew D. Cling - 2003 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 66 (2):279–303.
    Deductive and inductive logic confront this skeptical challenge: we can justify any logical principle only by means of an argument but we can acquire justification by means of an argument only if we are already justified in believing some logical principle. We could solve this problem if probative arguments do not require justified belief in their corresponding conditionals. For if not, then inferential justification would not require justified belief in any logical principle. So even arguments whose corresponding conditionals are epistemically (...)
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  24.  19
    It Is Past Time to Think More Inclusively About “Deaths of Despair”.Andrew D. Plunk, Richard A. Grucza & Stephanie L. Peglow - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (10):29-31.
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  25.  1
    Toward a More Democratic Ethic of Technological Governance.Andrew D. Zimmerman - 1995 - Science, Technology and Human Values 20 (1):86-107.
    Recent scholarship in technology and society studies has given attention to the notion of technological citizenship. This article seeks to further integrate perspectives on this topic with theoretical contributions about the development of moral autonomy. The author challenges the presumption that the strategy of expanding opportunities for participation in technological decision making will in itself develop people's autonomy and citizenship. He argues that concurrent efforts must be made to democratize the political-economic structures of key technologies and to help people prepare (...)
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  26.  62
    Cross-Situational Learning: An Experimental Study of Word-Learning Mechanisms.Kenny Smith, Andrew D. M. Smith & Richard A. Blythe - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (3):480-498.
    Cross-situational learning is a mechanism for learning the meaning of words across multiple exposures, despite exposure-by-exposure uncertainty as to the word's true meaning. We present experimental evidence showing that humans learn words effectively using cross-situational learning, even at high levels of referential uncertainty. Both overall success rates and the time taken to learn words are affected by the degree of referential uncertainty, with greater referential uncertainty leading to less reliable, slower learning. Words are also learned less successfully and more slowly (...)
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  27.  7
    Self-Supporting Arguments.Andrew D. Cling - 2003 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 66 (2):279-303.
    Deductive and inductive logic confront this skeptical challenge: we can justify any logical principle only by means of an argument but we can acquire justification by means of an argument only if we are already justified in believing some logical principle. We could solve this problem if probative arguments do not require justified belief in their corresponding conditionals. For if not, then inferential justification would not require justified belief in any logical principle. So even arguments whose corresponding conditionals are epistemically (...)
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  28.  81
    Cognitive Functions and Corticostriatal Circuits: Insights From Huntington's Disease.Andrew D. Lawrence, Barbara J. Sahakian & Trevor W. Robbins - 1998 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (10):379-388.
  29. Based Virtue Ethics 53–67 Ben Caplan/Quotation and Demonstration 69–80 Adam Sennet/An Ambiguity Test for Definite Descriptions 81–95. [REVIEW]Andrew D. Cling - 2002 - Philosophical Studies 111 (295).
     
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  30.  79
    Error Correction and the Basal Ganglia: Similar Computations for Action, Cognition and Emotion?Andrew D. Lawrence - 2000 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (10):365-367.
  31. An Analysis of Corporate Social Responsibility at Credit Line: A Narrative Approach.Michael Humphreys & Andrew D. Brown - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 80 (3):403-418.
    This article presents the results of an inductive, interpretive case study. We have adopted a narrative approach to the analysis of organizational processes in order to explore how individuals in a financial institution dealt with relatively novel issues of corporate social responsibility (CSR). The narratives that we reconstruct, which we label 'idealism and altruism', 'economics and expedience' and 'ignorance and cynicism' illustrate how people in the specific organizational context of a bank ('Credit Line') sought to cope with an attempt at (...)
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  32.  15
    Lessons From Everyday Lives: A Moral Justification for Acute Care Research.Andrew D. McRae & Charles Weijer - unknown
    Progress in emergency and critical care requires that clinical research be performed on patients who are incapable of granting consent for research participation. Analyses of the ethics of such research have left some questions incompletely answered. Why should we be permitted to expose vulnerable patients to research risks without their consent? In particular, how do we justify research interventions that have no potential benefit for participants (nontherapeutic interventions)? This article presents a moral justification for nontherapeutic interventions in emergency research. By (...)
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  33.  72
    Hertz, Boltzmann and Wittgenstein Reconsidered.Andrew D. Wilson - 1989 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 20 (2):245.
  34.  8
    Remediation.Andrew D. Harding & Mark W. Connolly - 2012 - Jona’s Healthcare Law, Ethics, and Regulation 14 (2):48-52.
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  35.  11
    Nurses' Risk Without Using Smart Pumps.Andrew D. Harding, Mark W. Connolly & Timothy O. Wilkerson - 2011 - Jona's Healthcare Law, Ethics, and Regulation 13 (1):17-20.
  36.  5
    Geschichte der Logik.Andrew D. Osborn - 1932 - Journal of Philosophy 29 (25):695.
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  37.  15
    Risk in Emergency Research Using a Waiver of/Exception From Consent: Implications of a Structured Approach for Institutional Review Board Review.Andrew D. McRae, Stacy Ackroyd-Stolarz & Charles Weijer - unknown
    OBJECTIVE: To apply component analysis, a structured approach to the ethical analysis of risks and potential benefits in research, to published emergency research using a waiver of/exception from informed consent. The hypothesis was that component analysis could be used with a high degree of interrater reliability, and that the vast majority of emergency research would comply with a minimal-risk threshold. METHODS: A Medline search and manual search were done to identify studies using a waiver of/exception from informed consent published between (...)
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  38.  6
    Ensuring That We Promote Participation in Health for Everyone.Andrew D. Plunk & Sarah Gehlert - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics 14 (6):19-20.
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  39.  8
    Public Health Research, Deception, and Distrust.Andrew D. Plunk & Richard A. Grucza - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (11):54-55.
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  40.  39
    Leadership, Identity, and Ethics.Dawn L. Eubanks, Andrew D. Brown & Sierk Ybema - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 107 (1):1-3.
  41.  35
    A Case for Criminal Negligence.Andrew D. Leipold - 2010 - Law and Philosophy 29 (4):455-468.
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  42.  34
    A Philosopher's Philosopher.Andrew D. Osborn - 1939 - Journal of Philosophy 36 (9):234-236.
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  43.  19
    Some Recent German Critics of Phenomenology.Andrew D. Osborn - 1934 - Journal of Philosophy 31 (14):377-382.
  44.  45
    Disappearance and Knowledge.Andrew D. Cling - 1990 - Philosophy of Science 57 (2):226-47.
    Paul Churchland argues that the continuity of human intellectual development provides evidence against folk psychology and traditional epistemology, since these latter find purchase only at the later stages of intellectual development. He supports this contention with an analogy from the history of thermodynamics. Careful attention to the thermodynamics analogy shows that the argument from continuity does not provide independent support for eliminative materialism. The argument also rests upon claims about continuity which do not support the claim that the continuity of (...)
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  45.  8
    Word Learning Under Infinite Uncertainty.Richard A. Blythe, Andrew D. M. Smith & Kenny Smith - 2016 - Cognition 151:18-27.
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  46.  9
    Using Versus Excusing: The Hudson’s Bay Company’s Long-Term Engagement with Its (Problematic) Past.Wim Van Lent & Andrew D. Smith - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 166 (2):215-231.
    Increased scrutiny of corporate legitimacy has sparked an interest in “historic corporate social responsibility”, or the mechanism through which firms take responsibility for past misdeeds. Extant theory on historic CSR implicitly treats corporate engagement with historical criticism as intentional and dichotomous, with firms choosing either a limited or a high engagement strategy. However, this conceptualization is puzzling because a firm’s engagement with historic claims involves organizational practices that managers don’t necessarily control; hence, it might materialize differently than anticipated. Furthermore, multiple (...)
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  47.  14
    Adherence, Surveillance, and Technological Hubris.Eric S. Swirsky & Andrew D. Boyd - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (9):61-62.
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  48.  33
    The Rationality of Induction. By D. C. Stove.Andrew D. Cling - 1988 - Modern Schoolman 65 (4):292-294.
  49.  11
    Love in the Time of Quantified Relationships.Eric S. Swirsky & Andrew D. Boyd - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (2):35-37.
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  50.  49
    Large Cardinals and Definable Well-Orders on the Universe.Andrew D. Brooke-Taylor - 2009 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 74 (2):641-654.
    We use a reverse Easton forcing iteration to obtain a universe with a definable well-order, while preserving the GCH and proper classes of a variety of very large cardinals. This is achieved by coding using the principle ◊ $_{k^ - }^* $ at a proper class of cardinals k. By choosing the cardinals at which coding occurs sufficiently sparsely, we are able to lift the embeddings witnessing the large cardinal properties without having to meet any non-trivial master conditions.
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