Results for 'Andrew Dobinson'

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  1.  13
    In That Case.Andrew Dobinson - 2006 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 3 (3):203-203.
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  2.  42
    Republication: In That Case. [REVIEW]Andrew Dobinson - 2007 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 4 (1):71-71.
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  3.  37
    I—Andrew Williams.Andrew Williams - 2004 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 78 (1):131-150.
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  4.  39
    Andrew Dobson: Trajectories of Green Political Theory Interview by Luc Semal, Mathilde Szuba and Olivier Petit.Andrew Dobson, Luc Semal, Mathilde Szuba & Olivier Petit - 2014 - Natures Sciences Sociétés 22 (2):132-141.
  5.  42
    Religious Fictionalism Defended: Reply to Cordry: Andrew Eshleman.Andrew Eshleman - 2010 - Religious Studies 46 (1):91-96.
    In his paper, ‘A critique of religious fictionalism’, Benjamin Cordry raises a series of objections to a fictionalist form of religious non-realism that I proposed in my earlier paper, ‘Can an atheist believe in God?’. They fall into two main categories: those alleging that an atheist would be unjustified in adopting fictionalism, and those alleging that fictionalism could not be successfully implemented, or practised communally. I argue that these objections can be met.
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  6. Agency and Autonomy in Kant's Moral Theory: Selected Essays.Andrews Reath - 2006 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Andrews Reath presents a selection of his best essays on various features of Kant's moral psychology and moral theory, with particular emphasis on his conception of rational agency and his conception of autonomy. Together the essays articulate Reath's original approach to Kant's views about human autonomy, which explains Kant's belief that objective moral requirements are based on principles we choose for ourselves. With two new papers, and revised versions of several others, the volume will be of great interest to all (...)
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  7.  53
    A Defence of the No-Minimum Response to the Problem of Evil: Andrew Cullison.Andrew Cullison - 2011 - Religious Studies 47 (1):121-123.
    I defend Peter van Inwagen's no-minimum response to the problem of evil from a recent objection raised by Jeff Jordan.
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  8.  81
    Contractarianism and Interspecies Welfare Conflicts: Andrew I. Cohen.Andrew I. Cohen - 2009 - Social Philosophy and Policy 26 (1):227-257.
    In this essay I describe how contractarianism might approach interspecies welfare conflicts. I start by discussing a contractarian account of the moral status of nonhuman animals. I argue that contractors can agree to norms that would acknowledge the “moral standing” of some animals. I then discuss how the norms emerging from contractarian agreement might constrain any comparison of welfare between humans and animals. Contractarian agreement is likely to express some partiality to humans in a way that discounts the welfare of (...)
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  9. The Feeling Animal.Andrew M. Bailey & Allison Krile Thornton - forthcoming - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy.
    For good or for ill, we have animal bodies. Through them, we move around, eat and drink, and do many other things besides. We owe much – perhaps our very lives – to these ever-present animals. But how exactly do we relate to our animals? Are we parts of them, or they of us? Do we and these living animals co-inhere or constitute or coincide? Or what? Animalism answers that we are identical to them. There are many objections to animalism, (...)
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  10.  75
    Defending Objectivity: Essays in Honour of Andrew Collier.Andrew Collier, Margaret Scotford Archer & William Outhwaite (eds.) - 2004 - Routledge.
    Andrew Collier is the boldest defender of objectivity - in science, knowledge, thought, action, politics, morality and religion. In this tribute and acknowledgement of the influence his work has had on a wide readership, his colleagues show that they have been stimulated by his thinking and offer challenging responses. This wide-ranging book covers key areas with which defenders of objectivity often have to engage. Sections are devoted to the following: 'objectivity of value', 'objectivity and everyday knowledge', 'objectivity in political (...)
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  11.  90
    Foucault and Political Reason: Liberalism, Neo-Liberalism, and Rationalities of Government.Andrew Barry, Thomas Osborne & Nikolas Rose (eds.) - 1996 - University of Chicago Press.
    Despite the enormous influence of Michel Foucault in gender studies, social theory, and cultural studies, his work has been relatively neglected in the study of politics. Although he never published a book on the state, in the late 1970s Foucault examined the technologies of power used to regulate society and the ingenious recasting of power and agency that he saw as both consequence and condition of their operation. These twelve essays provide a critical introduction to Foucault's work on politics, exploring (...)
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  12.  49
    The Origins of Morality: An Essay in Philosophical Anthropology: Andrew Oldenquist.Andrew Oldenquist - 1990 - Social Philosophy and Policy 8 (1):121-140.
    By what steps, historically, did morality emerge? Our remote ancestors evolved into social animals. Sociality requires, among other things, restraints on disruptive sexual, hostile, aggressive, vengeful, and acquisitive behavior. Since we are innately social and not social by convention, we can assume the biological evolution of the emotional equipment – numerous predispositions to want, fear, feel anxious or secure – required for social living, just as we can assume cultural evolution of various means to control antisocial behavior and reinforce the (...)
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  13.  50
    Canonizing Dewey: Naturalism, Logical Empiricism, and the Idea of American Philosophy*: Andrew Jewett.Andrew Jewett - 2011 - Modern Intellectual History 8 (1):91-125.
    Between World War I and World War II, the students of Columbia University's John Dewey and Frederick J. E. Woodbridge built up a school of philosophical naturalism sharply critical of claims to value-neutrality. In the 1930s and 1940s, the second-generation Columbia naturalists and their students who later joined the department reacted with dismay to the arrival on American shores of logical empiricism and other analytic modes of philosophy. These figures undermined their colleague Ernest Nagel's attempt to build an alliance with (...)
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  14. Two Thesis About the Distinctness of Practical and Theoretical Normativity.Andrew Reisner - 2018 - In C. McHugh, J. Way & D. Whiting (eds.), Normativity: Epistemic and Practical. Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press. pp. 221-240.
    In tradition linked to Aristotle and Kant, many contemporary philosophers treat practical and theoretical normativity as two genuinely distinct domains of normativity. In this paper I consider the question of what it is for normative domains to be distinct. I suggest that there are two different ways that the distinctness thesis might be understood and consider the different implications of the two different distinctness theses.
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  15. Technology, Modernity, and Democracy: Essays by Andrew Feenberg.Eduardo Beira & Andrew Feenberg (eds.) - 2018 - Rowman & Littlefield International.
    This important collection of essays by Andrew Feenberg presents his critical theory of technology, an innovative approach to philosophy and sociology of technology based on a synthesis of ideas drawn from STS and Frankfurt School Critical Theory. The volume includes chapters on citizenship, modernity, and Heidegger and Marcuse.
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  16. Can Physicalism Be Non-Reductive?Andrew Melnyk - 2008 - Philosophy Compass 3 (6):1281-1296.
    Can physicalism (or materialism) be non-reductive? I provide an opinionated survey of the debate on this question. I suggest that attempts to formulate non-reductive physicalism by appeal to claims of event identity, supervenience, or realization have produced doctrines that fail either to be physicalist or to be non-reductive. Then I treat in more detail a recent attempt to formulate non-reductive physicalism by Derk Pereboom, but argue that it fares no better.
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  17. The Economic Theory of Social Institutions.Andrew Schotter - 2008 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book uses game theory to analyse the creation, evolution and function of economic and social institutions. The author illustrates his analysis by describing the organic or unplanned evolution of institutions such as the conventions of war, the use of money, property rights and oligopolistic pricing conventions. Professor Schotter begins by linking his work with the ideas of the philosophers Rawls, Nozick and Lewis. Institutions are regarded as regularities in the behaviour of social agents, which the agents themselves tacitly create (...)
     
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  18. Horgan and Tienson on Phenomenology and Intentionality.Andrew Bailey & Bradley Richards - 2014 - Philosophical Studies 167 (2):313-326.
    Terence Horgan, George Graham and John Tienson argue that some intentional content is constitutively determined by phenomenology alone. We argue that this would require a certain kind of covariation of phenomenal states and intentional states that is not established by Horgan, Tienson and Graham’s arguments. We make the case that there is inadequate reason to think phenomenology determines perceptual belief, and that there is reason to doubt that phenomenology determines any species of non-perceptual intentionality. We also raise worries about the (...)
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  19. The Twin Earth Chronicles: Twenty Years of Reflection on Hilary Putnam’s “the Meaning of ”Meaning’ ‘.Andrew Pessin & Sanford Goldberg (eds.) - 1996 - M. E. Sharpe.
    This volume will acquaint novice philosophers with one of the most important debates in twentieth-century philosophy, and will provide seasoned readers with a ...
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  20.  40
    Malebranche.Andrew Pyle - 2003 - Routledge.
    Nicolas Malebranche is one of the most important philosophers of the 17th Century after Descartes. A pioneer of Rationalism, he was one of the first to champion and to further Cartesian ideas. Andrew Pyle places Malebranche's work in the context of Descartes and other philosophers, and also in its relation to ideas about faith and reason. He examines the entirety of Malebranche's writings, including the famous The Search After Truth , which was admired and criticized by both Leibniz and (...)
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  21. Non-Classical Metatheory for Non-Classical Logics.Andrew Bacon - 2013 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 42 (2):335-355.
    A number of authors have objected to the application of non-classical logic to problems in philosophy on the basis that these non-classical logics are usually characterised by a classical metatheory. In many cases the problem amounts to more than just a discrepancy; the very phenomena responsible for non-classicality occur in the field of semantics as much as they do elsewhere. The phenomena of higher order vagueness and the revenge liar are just two such examples. The aim of this paper is (...)
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  22. An Introduction to Mathematical Logic and Type Theory: To Truth Through Proof.P. B. Andrews - 2002 - Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    This introduction to mathematical logic starts with propositional calculus and first-order logic. Topics covered include syntax, semantics, soundness, completeness, independence, normal forms, vertical paths through negation normal formulas, compactness, Smullyan's Unifying Principle, natural deduction, cut-elimination, semantic tableaux, Skolemization, Herbrand's Theorem, unification, duality, interpolation, and definability. The last three chapters of the book provide an introduction to type theory (higher-order logic). It is shown how various mathematical concepts can be formalized in this very expressive formal language. This expressive notation facilitates proofs (...)
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  23. The Myth of Anthropomorphism John Andrew Fisher.John Andrew Fisher - 1996 - In Colin Allen & D. Jamison (eds.), Readings in Animal Cognition. MIT Press.
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  24. Naughty Beliefs.Andrew Huddleston - 2012 - Philosophical Studies 160 (2):209-222.
    Can a person ever occurrently believe p and yet have the simultaneous, occurrent belief q that this very belief that p is false? Surely not, most would say: that description of a person’s epistemic economy seems to misunderstand the very concept of belief. In this paper I question this orthodox assumption. There are, I suggest, cases where we have a first-order mental state m that involves taking the world to be a certain way, yet although we ourselves acknowledge that we (...)
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  25. Friends Over the Ocean Andrew Lang's American Correspondents 1881-1912.Andrew Lang & Marysa Demoor - 1989 - Rijksuniversiteit Te Gent.
     
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  26. The Epistemic Regress Problem.Andrew D. Cling - 2008 - Philosophical Studies 140 (3):401 - 421.
    The best extant statement of the epistemic regress problem makes assumptions that are too strong. An improved version assumes only that that reasons require support, that no proposition is supported only by endless regresses of reasons, and that some proposition is supported. These assumptions are individually plausible but jointly inconsistent. Attempts to explain support by means of unconceptualized sensations, contextually immunized propositions, endless regresses, and holistic coherence all require either additional reasons or an external condition on support that is arbitrary (...)
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  27.  22
    Andrew’s Literary Death Quiz.Andrew Dodsworth - 2000 - Philosophy Now 27:47-47.
  28.  86
    Deep Disagreement and Informal Logic: No Cause for Alarm.Andrew Lugg - 1986 - Informal Logic 8 (1).
    An argument that the deepest disagreement can on occasion be resolved albeit over time.
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  29.  75
    The Validity of the Mayer–Salovey–Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) as a Measure of Emotional Intelligence.Andrew Maul - 2012 - Emotion Review 4 (4):394-402.
    The concept of emotional intelligence (EI) has drawn a great amount of scholarly interest in recent years; however, attempts to measure individual differences in this ability remain controversial. Although the Mayer–Salovey–Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) remains the flagship test of EI, no study has comprehensively examined the full interpretive argument tying variation in observed test performance to variation in the underlying ability. Employing a modern perspective on validation, this article reviews and synthesizes available evidence and discusses sources of concern at (...)
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  30.  44
    Extended Modal Realism — a New Solution to the Problem of Intentional Inexistence.Andrew D. Thomas - 2020 - Philosophia 48 (3):1197-1208.
    Kriegel described the problem of intentional inexistence as one of the ‘perennial problems of philosophy’, 307–340, 2007: 307). In the same paper, Kriegel alluded to a modal realist solution to the problem of intentional inexistence. However, Kriegel does not state by name who defends the kind of modal realist solution he has in mind. Kriegel also points out that even what he believes to be the strongest version of modal realism does not pass the ‘principle of representation’ and thus modal (...)
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  31. Why Things Matter to People: Social Science, Values and Ethical Life.Andrew Sayer - 2011 - Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
    Andrew Sayer undertakes a fundamental critique of social science's difficulties in acknowledging that people's relation to the world is one of concern. As sentient beings, capable of flourishing and suffering, and particularly vulnerable to how others treat us, our view of the world is substantially evaluative. Yet modernist ways of thinking encourage the common but extraordinary belief that values are beyond reason, and merely subjective or matters of convention, with little or nothing to do with the kind of beings (...)
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  32. The Science of Harmonics in Classical Greece.Andrew Barker - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    The ancient science of harmonics investigates the arrangements of pitched sounds which form the basis of musical melody, and the principles which govern them. It was the most important branch of Greek musical theory, studied by philosophers, mathematicians and astronomers as well as by musical specialists. This 2007 book examines its development during the period when its central ideas and rival schools of thought were established, laying the foundations for the speculations of later antiquity, the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. (...)
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  33.  25
    Andrew J. McKenna., Violence and Difference: Girard, Derrida, and Deconstruction.Andrew J. Mckenna & Mark Youngerman - 1994 - International Studies in Philosophy 26 (4):149-150.
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  34. The Philosophy of Music.Andrew Kania - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    This is an overview of analytic philosophy of music. It is in five sections, as follows: 1. What Is Music? 2. Musical Ontology 3. Music and the Emotions 4. Understanding Music 5. Music and Value.
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  35.  39
    Philosophy and Politics: An Interview with Andrew Collier, Part.Andrew Collier & Gideon Calder - 2008 - Journal of Critical Realism 7 (2):276-296.
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  36.  63
    Constructing Quarks: A Sociological History of Particle Physics.Andrew Pickering - 1984 - University of Chicago Press.
    Inviting a reappraisal of the status of scientific knowledge, Andrew Pickering suggests that scientists are not mere passive observers and reporters of nature.
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  37. Robert Andrew Glendinning Carson 1918–2006.Andrew Burnett & Roger Bland - 2008 - In Proceedings of the British Academy, Volume 153 Biographical Memoirs of Fellows, VII. pp. 149-170.
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  38. A Physicalist Manifesto: Thoroughly Modern Materialism.Andrew Melnyk - 2003 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    A Physicalist Manifesto is a full treatment of the comprehensive physicalist view that, in some important sense, everything is physical. Andrew Melnyk argues that the view is best formulated by appeal to a carefully worked-out notion of realization, rather than supervenience; that, so formulated, physicalism must be importantly reductionist; that it need not repudiate causal and explanatory claims framed in non-physical language; and that it has the a posteriori epistemic status of a broad-scope scientific hypothesis. Two concluding chapters argue (...)
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  39.  26
    From the Fixity of the Past to the Fixity of the Independent.Andrew Law - 2021 - Philosophical Studies 178 (4):1301-1314.
    There is an old but powerful argument for the claim that exhaustive divine foreknowledge is incompatible with the freedom to do otherwise. A crucial ingredient in this argument is the principle of the “Fixity of the Past”. A seemingly new response to this argument has emerged, the so-called “dependence response,” which involves, among other things, abandoning FP for an alternative principle, the principle of the “Fixity of the Independent”. This paper presents three arguments for the claim that FI ought to (...)
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  40.  9
    Corporate Social Responsibility as Obligated Internalisation of Social Costs.Andrew Johnston, Kenneth Amaeshi, Emmanuel Adegbite & Onyeka Osuji - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (1):39-52.
    We propose that corporations should be subject to a legal obligation to identify and internalise their social costs or negative externalities. Our proposal reframes corporate social responsibility as obligated internalisation of social costs, and relies on reflexive governance through mandated hybrid fora. We argue that our approach advances theory, as well as practice and policy, by building on and going beyond prior attempts to address social costs, such as prescriptive government regulation, Coasian bargaining and political CSR.
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  41.  74
    Concepts in Film Theory.Dudley Andrew - 1984 - Oxford University Press.
    Concepts in Film Theory is a continuation of Dudley Andrew's classic, The Major Film Theories. In writing now about contemporary theory, Andrew focuses on the key concepts in film study -- perception, representation, signification, narrative structure, adaptation, evaluation, identification, figuration, and interpretation. Beginning with an introductory chapter on the current state of film theory, Andrew goes on to build an overall view of film, presenting his own ideas on each concept, and giving a sense of the interdependence (...)
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  42.  30
    God and the World of Signs: Trinity, Evolution, and the Metaphysical Semiotics of C. S. Peirce.Andrew Robinson - 2010 - Brill.
    Drawing on the philosophy of C. S. Peirce, Robinson develops a ‘semiotic model’ of the Trinity and proposes a new theology of nature according to which the evolving cosmos may be understood as bearing ‘vestiges of the Trinity in ...
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  43.  55
    Individual and Collective Responsibility.Andrew C. Khoury - 2017 - In Zachary J. Goldberg (ed.), Reflections on Ethics and Responsibility: Essays in Honor of Peter A. French. Springer. pp. 1-20.
    Building on Peter French’s important work, this chapter draws three distinctions that arise in the context of attributions of moral responsibility, understood as the extent to which an agent is blameworthy or praiseworthy. First, the subject of an attribution of responsibility may be an individual agent or a collective agent. Second, the object of the responsibility attribution may be an individual action (or consequence) or a collective action (or consequence). The third distinction concerns the temporal dimension of the responsibility attribution. (...)
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  44.  76
    Justification-Affording Circular Arguments.Andrew D. Cling - 2002 - Philosophical Studies 111 (3):251 - 275.
    An argument whose conclusion C is essential evidence for one of its premises can provide its target audience with justification for believing C. This is possible because we can enhance our justification for believing a proposition C by integrating it into an explanatory network of beliefs for which C itself provides essential evidence. I argue for this in light of relevant features of doxastic circularity, epistemic circularity, and explanatory inferences. Finally, I confirm my argument with an example and respond to (...)
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  45. An Apology for the “New Atheism”.Andrew Johnson - 2013 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 73 (1):5-28.
    In recent years, a series of bestselling atheist manifestos by Sam Harris, Richard Dawkins, and Christopher Hitchens has thrust the topic of the rationality of religion into the public discourse. Christian moderates of an intellectual bent and even some agnostics and atheists have taken umbrage and lashed back. In this paper I defend the New Atheists against three common charges: that their critiques of religion commit basic logical fallacies (such as straw man, false dichotomy, or hasty generalization), that their own (...)
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  46. Science as Practice and Culture.Andrew Pickering (ed.) - 1992 - University of Chicago Press.
    Science as Practice and Culture explores one of the newest and most controversial developments within the rapidly changing field of science studies: the move toward studying scientific practice--the work of doing science--and the associated move toward studying scientific culture, understood as the field of resources that practice operates in and on. Andrew Pickering has invited leading historians, philosophers, sociologists, and anthropologists of science to prepare original essays for this volume. The essays range over the physical and biological sciences and (...)
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  47. Can We Really Vote with Our Forks? Opportunism and the Threshold Chicken.Andrew Chignell - 2016 - In Philosophy Comes to Dinner. pp. 182-202.
  48.  7
    Atomism and its Critics: From Democritus to Newton.Andrew Pyle - 1995 - Thoemmes Press.
    A substantial and in-depth study of the history of the atomic theory of matter between the time of Democritus and that of Newton. It is the first to emphasize the continuity of the atomic debate and the debt owed by the seventeenth-century "moderns" to the medieval critique of Aristotle.
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  49. Reclaiming the History of Ethics: Essays for John Rawls.Andrews Reath, Barbara Herman & Christine M. Korsgaard (eds.) - 1997 - Cambridge University Press.
    The essays in this volume offer an approach to the history of moral and political philosophy that takes its inspiration from John Rawls. All the contributors are philosophers who have studied with Rawls and they offer this collection in his honour. The distinctive feature of this approach is to address substantive normative questions in moral and political philosophy through an analysis of the texts and theories of major figures in the history of the subject: Aristotle, Hobbes, Hume, Rousseau, Kant and (...)
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  50.  18
    Being Realistic About Neoliberalism.Andrew Norris - 2020 - Constellations 27 (1):63-78.
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