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Andrew Inkpin
University of Melbourne
  1.  30
    Merleau-Ponty’s Gordian Knot: Transcendental Phenomenology, Science, and Naturalism.Jack Reynolds & Andrew Inkpin - 2017 - Continental Philosophy Review 50 (1):81-104.
    In this paper I explore a series of fertile ambiguities that Merleau-Ponty’s work is premised upon. These ambiguities concern some of the central methodological commitments of his work, in particular his commitment to transcendental phenomenology and how he transforms that tradition, and his relationship to science and philosophical naturalism and what they suggest about his philosophical methodology. Many engagements with Merleau-Ponty’s work that are more ‘analytic’ in orientation either deflate it of its transcendental heritage, or offer a “modest” rendering of (...)
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  2.  13
    Merleau‐Ponty and the Significance of Style.Andrew Inkpin - forthcoming - European Journal of Philosophy.
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  3.  19
    Being Articulate: Rede in Heidegger’s Being and Time.Andrew Inkpin - 2017 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 25 (1):99-118.
    Being and Time’s emphasis on practical activities has attracted much attention as an approach to meaning not modelled exclusively on language. However, understanding this emphasis is made more difficult by Heidegger’s notion of Rede, which he routinely characterizes as both language-like and basic to all disclosure. This paper assesses whether this notion can be both interpreted coherently and reconciled with Heidegger’s emphasis on intelligent nonlinguistic behaviours. It begins by identifying two functions of Articulacy – the demonstrative and articulatory – and (...)
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  4.  3
    Nietzsche’s Genealogy: A Textbook Parody.Andrew Inkpin - 2018 - Nietzsche Studien Gesamtregister Bände 1-20 47 (1):140-166.
    Given its apparently scholarly form, the Genealogy of Morals is often read as a succinct, relatively systematic, and canonical exposition of Nietzsche’s mature views on morality. This article argues, however, that the work was intended as a parody of a scholarly treatise and examines how this parody is best understood. It begins by surveying some evidence that supports reading the Genealogy as a ‘textbook’ presentation of Nietzsche’s views. It then develops an exegetic case for reading it as a work of (...)
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  5.  3
    Undoing Aesthetics.Wolfgang Welsch & Andrew Inkpin - 2000 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 58 (1):83-84.
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  6.  19
    The Nonconceptual Content of Paintings.Andrew Inkpin - 2011 - Estetika 48 (1):29-45.
    This article argues that paintings have a nonconceptual content unlike that of mechanically produced images. The first part of the article outlines an information-theory approach modelled on the camera and based on the idea that pictures convey information about what they depict. Picture structure is conceived of as contentful by virtue of a supposed causal link with what is depicted and as nonconceptual because it is independent of observers’ understanding. The second part introduces an embodied depiction approach based on Merleau-Ponty’s (...)
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  7.  29
    Was Merleau-Ponty a ‘Transcendental’ Phenomenologist?Andrew Inkpin - 2017 - Continental Philosophy Review 50 (1):27-47.
    Whether or not Merleau-Ponty’s version of phenomenology should be considered a form of ‘transcendental’ philosophy is open to debate. Although the Phenomenology of Perception presents his position as a transcendental one, many of its features—such as its exploitation of empirical science—might lead to doubt that it can be. This paper considers whether Merleau-Ponty meets what I call the ‘transcendentalist challenge’ of defining and grounding claims of a distinctive transcendental kind. It begins by highlighting three features—the absolute ego, the pure phenomenal (...)
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  8.  39
    Projection, Recognition, and Pictorial Diversity.Andrew Inkpin - 2016 - Theoria 82 (1):32-55.
    This article focuses on the difficulty for a general theory of depiction of providing a notion of pictorial content that accommodates the full diversity of picture types. The article begins by introducing two basic models of pictorial content using paradigmatic positions that maximize the ability of the respective models to deal with pictorial diversity. Kulvicki's On Images is interpreted as a generalized projection-based model which proposes a scene-centred notion of pictorial content. By contrast, Lopes's aspect-recognition theory, in Understanding Pictures, is (...)
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  9.  13
    Sartre's Literary Phenomenology.Andrew Inkpin - 2017 - Sartre Studies International 23 (1):1-21.
    This article focuses on the relation between philosophy and literature in early Sartre, showing how his literary writing can be seen as philosophically significant by interpreting Sartre as practising a variant of phenomenological method. I first clarify Sartre’s approach to phenomenological method by comparing and contrasting it with Husserl’s. Despite agreeing that philosophy is a reflective descriptive study of essences, Sartre sees no use for phenomenological reduction and free variation. I then consider the philosophical function of Sartre’s literary works, arguing (...)
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  10.  16
    Introduction: Merleau-Ponty’s Gordian Knot.Andrew Inkpin & Jack Reynolds - 2017 - Continental Philosophy Review 50 (1):1-3.
  11.  1
    Phenomenology of Language in a 4e-World.Andrew Inkpin - 2016 - In Jack Alan Reynolds & Richard Sebold (eds.), Phenomenology and Science. New York, USA: Palgrave. pp. 141-159.
    In recent years there has been much productive interaction between phenomenological authors and work in (‘4e’) cognitive science emphasizing the embodied, embedded, enactive and extended nature of cognition. These interactions have centred on areas of interest common to phenomenology and philosophy of mind, such as embodiment or first-personal experience, with language receiving relatively little attention. This paper aims to broaden these interactions by showing how phenomenology of language complements systematic empirical theories in the 4e tradition. It begins by outlining a (...)
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  12.  48
    Ideas Above its Station: Putting Folk Psychology in its Place.Andrew Inkpin - 2010 - European Journal of Philosophy 18 (4):588-599.
  13.  17
    Taking Rorty's Irony Seriously.Andrew Inkpin - 2013 - Humanities 2 (2):292-312.
    Richard Rorty’s Contingency, Irony and Solidarity (CIS) is an ambitious and provocative, but for many readers a deeply flawed work. This paper argues that many of its apparent flaws can be understood as integral to Rorty’s attempt to write a work of private, post-theoretical irony. The paper’s first section outlines the substantive theoretical claims about language, selfhood and community which Rorty proposes as an antiessentialist alternative to ‘metaphysics’. The second identifies three difficulties—residual dualism, conceptual problems with the public-private distinction, and (...)
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  14.  44
    Disclosing the World: On the Phenomenology of Language.Andrew Inkpin - 2016 - MIT Press.
    In this book, Andrew Inkpin considers the disclosive function of language—what language does in revealing or disclosing the world. His approach to this question is a phenomenological one, centering on the need to accord with the various experiences speakers can have of language. With this aim in mind, he develops a phenomenological conception of language with important implications for both the philosophy of language and recent work in the embodied-embedded-enactive-extended tradition of cognitive science. -/- Inkpin draws extensively on the work (...)
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  15. Formale Anzeige Und Das Voraussetzungsproblem.Andrew Inkpin - 2010 - In Friederike Rese (ed.), Heidegger und Husserl im Vergleich. Frankfurt/Main: Klostermann. pp. 13-33.
    Zunächst wird dargelegt, wie Heidegger bei seinem Anschluß an Husserls Projekt einer radikalen Phänomenologie ein deutlicheres Verständnis für die methodologische Rolle von Voraussetzungen entwickelt. Die Idee der formalen Anzeige, die Heideggers Schriften um 1920 durchzieht, wird als ein nichtsetzender, schematischer Modus des Zeichengebrauchs expliziert, der auf wiederholte phänomenologische Auslegung abgestimmt ist. Abschließend wird dargelegt, wie diese Idee auf eine Umdeutung des Wesens von „Voraussetzungen“ hinausläuft, und erwogen, was dies für das ambivalente Verhältnis von Heidegger zu Husserl zeigt. / -/- It (...)
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  16. McDowell and the Puzzle of Conceptual Form.Andrew Inkpin - 2015 - Minerva - An Internet Journal of Philosophy 19 (1):64-80.
    In the course of recent debate with Hubert Dreyfus John McDowell emphasizes the notion of conceptual form or shape to explain how conceptual capacities are ‘operative’ in prereflective ‘coping’ activities. This paper considers how that notion is to be interpreted. In particular it considers whether or not it imposes a determinate constraint on the form of content and argues that both interpretations are unsatisfactory. Assuming conceptual form to be determinate is unnecessary to explain the universal applicability of concepts and conflicts (...)
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  17. The Complexities of ‘Abstracting’ From Nature.Andrew Inkpin - 2012 - In Paul Crowther & Isabel Wünsche (eds.), Meanings of Abstract Art: From Nature to Theory. London: Routledge. pp. 255-269.
    This paper considers what it is to abstract from nature. Using examples from painting its first part examines the traditional contrast between abstraction and naturalistic representation, arguing that this relies on a specifically visual notion of representation, but not on what is natural or what is abstract. Its second part discusses examples from land art in which natural elements are incorporated in an artwork’s structure. An alternative view of modern art’s representational possibilities is outlined which highlights limitations of the specifically (...)
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