14 found
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  1. Is Dawkins a Modern-Day Nicodemus?Andrew McGee - unknown
    This article applies a Wittgensteinian approach to the examination of the intelligibility of religious belief, in the wake of the recent attack on the Judeo-Christian religion by Richard Dawkins's book The God Delusion. The article attempts to show that Dawkins has confused religion with superstition, and that while Dawkins's arguments are decisive in the case of superstition, they do not successfully show religion to be a delusion. Religious belief in God is not like belief in the existence of a planet, (...)
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  2. Is There Such a Thing as a Love Drug?Andrew McGee - forthcoming - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (2):79-92.
    This paper considers recent discussion of the possible use of ‘love drugs’ and ‘anti-love drugs’ as a way of enhancing or diminishing romantic relationships. The primary focus is on the question of whether the idea of using such products commits its proponents to an excessively reductionist conception of love, and on whether the resulting ‘love’ in the use of ‘love drugs’ would be authentic, to the extent that it would be brought about artificially.
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  3.  18
    We Are Human Beings.Andrew McGee - 2016 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 41 (2):148-171.
    In this paper, I examine Jeff McMahan’s arguments for his claim that we are not human organisms, and the arguments of Derek Parfit to the same effect in a recent paper. McMahan uses these arguments to derive conclusions concerning the moral status of embryos and permanent vegetative state patients. My claim will be that neither thinker has successfully shown that we are not human beings, and therefore these arguments do not establish the ethical conclusions that McMahan has sought to draw (...)
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  4. The Potentiality of the Embryo and the Somatic Cell.Andrew McGee - 2014 - Metaphilosophy 45 (4-5):689-706.
    Recent arguments on the ethics of stem cell research have taken a novel approach to the question of the moral status of the embryo. One influential argument focuses on a property that the embryo is said to possess—namely, the property of being an entity with a rational nature or, less controversially, an entity that has the potential to acquire a rational nature—and claims that this property is also possessed by a somatic cell. Since nobody seriously thinks that we have a (...)
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  5.  27
    Intention, Foresight, and Ending Life.Andrew Mcgee - 2013 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 22 (1):77-85.
  6.  11
    Acting to Let Someone Die.Andrew McGee - 2015 - Bioethics 29 (2):74-81.
    This paper examines the recent prominent view in medical ethics that withdrawing life-sustaining treatment is an act of killing. I trace this view to the rejection of the traditional claim that withdrawing LST is an omission rather than an act. Although that traditional claim is not as problematic as this recent prominent view suggests, my main claim is that even if we accepted that withdrawing LST should be classified as an act rather than as an omission, it could still be (...)
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  7.  1
    Reasons, Causes and Identity.Andrew McGee - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2017-104318.
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  8.  60
    Omissions, Causation, and Responsibility.Andrew McGee - 2011 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (4):351-361.
    In this paper I discuss a recent exchange of articles between Hugh McLachlan and John Coggon on the relationship between omissions, causation, and moral responsibility. My aim is to contribute to their debate by isolating a presupposition I believe they both share and by questioning that presupposition. The presupposition is that, at any given moment, there are countless things that I am omitting to do. This leads both McLachlan and Coggon to give a distorted account of the relationship between causation (...)
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  9.  32
    Me and My Body: The Relevance of the Distinction for the Difference Between Withdrawing Life Support and Euthanasia.Andrew McGee - 2011 - Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 39 (4):671-677.
    In this paper, I discuss David Shaw's claim that the body of a terminally ill person can be conceived as a kind of life support, akin to an artificial ventilator. I claim that this position rests upon an untenable dualism between the mind and the body. Given that dualism continues to be attractive to some thinkers, I attempt to diagnose the reasons why it continues to be attractive, as well as to demonstrate its incoherence, drawing on some recent work in (...)
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  10.  3
    Permanence Can Be Defended.Andrew Mcgee & Dale Gardiner - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (3):220-230.
    In donation after the circulatory-respiratory determination of death, the dead donor rule requires that the donor be dead before organ procurement can proceed. Under the relevant limb of the Uniform Determination of Death Act 1981, a person is dead when the cessation of circulatory-respiratory function is ‘irreversible’. Critics of current practice in DCDD have argued that the donor is not dead at the time organs are procured, and so the procurement of organs from these donors violates the dead donor rule. (...)
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  11.  8
    When Does Pain and Distress Relief Hastening Death Become Killing?Andrew McGee - unknown
    This paper discusses the question of when pain and distress relief known to hasten death would cross the line between permissible conduct and killing. The issue is discussed in the context of organ donation after cardiac death, and considers the administration of analgesics, sedatives, and the controversial use of paralysing agents in the provision and withdrawal of ventilation.
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  12.  1
    Me and My Body: The Relevance of the Distinction for the Difference Between Withdrawing Life Support and Euthanasia.Andrew McGee - 2011 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (4):671-677.
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  13. Love's Exemplars: A Response to Gupta, Earp, and Savulescu.Andrew McGee - 2016 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (2):101-102.
    I am grateful to Brian Earp, Julian Savulescu, and Kristina Gupta for their thoughtful remarks on my paper. I cannot answer all of their points here, but select what I consider to be the most important. Gupta believes that I commit myself to “a common sense” account of love. This is not so. “Common sense” refers to beliefs, not concepts. Concepts can be used to express true, false, and diametrically opposed beliefs, so are not themselves beliefs; rather, they are the (...)
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  14. Permanence Can Be Defended.Andrew McGee & Dale Gardiner - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (3):220-230.
    In donation after the circulatory-respiratory determination of death, the dead donor rule requires that the donor be dead before organ procurement can proceed. Under the relevant limb of the Uniform Determination of Death Act 1981, a person is dead when the cessation of circulatory-respiratory function is ‘irreversible’. Critics of current practice in DCDD have argued that the donor is not dead at the time organs are procured, and so the procurement of organs from these donors violates the dead donor rule. (...)
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