Results for 'Andrew P. Friesen'

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  1.  23
    Brief Online Training Enhances Competitive Performance: Findings of the BBC Lab UK Psychological Skills Intervention Study.Andrew M. Lane, Peter Totterdell, Ian MacDonald, Tracey J. Devonport, Andrew P. Friesen, Christopher J. Beedie, Damian Stanley & Alan Nevill - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
  2.  10
    Testing Simulation Models Using Frequentist Statistics.Andrew P. Robinson - 2019 - In Claus Beisbart & Nicole J. Saam (eds.), Computer Simulation Validation: Fundamental Concepts, Methodological Frameworks, and Philosophical Perspectives. Springer Verlag. pp. 465-496.
    One approach to validating simulation models is to formally compare model outputs with independent data. We consider such model validation from the point of view of Frequentist statistics. A range of estimates and tests of goodness of fit have been advanced. We review these approaches, and demonstrate that some of the tests suffer from difficulties in interpretation because they rely on the null hypothesisHypothesis that the model is similar to the observationsObservations. This reliance creates two unpleasant possibilities, namely, a model (...)
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  3. Consciousness, control, and confidence: The 3 cs of recognition memory.Andrew P. Yonelinas - 2001 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 130 (3):361-379.
  4.  27
    Noncriterial Recollection: Familiarity as Automatic, Irrelevant Recollection.Andrew P. Yonelinas & Larry L. Jacoby - 1995 - Consciousness and Cognition 5 (1-2):131-141.
    Recollection is sometimes automatic in that details of a prior encounter with an item come to mind although those details are irrelevant to a current task. For example, when asked about the size of the type in which an item was earlier presented, one might automatically recollect the location in which it was presented. We used the process dissociation procedure to show that such noncriterial recollection can function as familiarity—its effects were independent of intended recollection.
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  5. Signal-Detection, Threshold, and Dual-Process Models of Recognition Memory: ROCs and Conscious Recollection.Andrew P. Yonelinas, Ian Dobbins, Michael D. Szymanski, Harpreet S. Dhaliwal & Ling King - 1995 - Consciousness and Cognition 5 (4):418-441.
    Threshold- and signal-detection-based models have dominated theorizing about recognition memory. Building upon these theoretical frameworks, we have argued for a dual-process model in which conscious recollection and familiarity contribute to memory performance. In the current paper we assessed several memory models by examining the effects of levels of processing and the number of presentations on recognition memory receiver operating characteristics . In general, when the ROCs were plotted in probability space they exhibited an inverted U shape; however, when they were (...)
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  6. Components of episodic memory: the contribution of recollection and familiarity.Andrew P. Yonelinas - 2002 - In Alan Baddeley, John Aggleton & Martin Conway (eds.), Episodic Memory: New Directions in Research. Oxford University Press.
  7.  18
    The role of recollection and familiarity in visual working memory: A mixture of threshold and signal detection processes.Andrew P. Yonelinas - 2024 - Psychological Review 131 (2):321-348.
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  8.  96
    “Gaze leading”: Initiating simulated joint attention influences eye movements and choice behavior.Andrew P. Bayliss, Emily Murphy, Claire K. Naughtin, Ada Kritikos, Leonhard Schilbach & Stefanie I. Becker - 2013 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 142 (1):76.
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  9.  21
    Vulnerability to depression is associated with a failure to acquire implicit social appraisals.Andrew P. Bayliss, Steven P. Tipper, Judi Wakeley, Phillip J. Cowen & Robert D. Rogers - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (4):825-833.
  10.  41
    The Organism as a Whole in an Analysis of Death.Andrew P. Huang & James L. Bernat - 2019 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 44 (6):712-731.
    Although death statutes permitting physicians to declare brain death are relatively uniform throughout the United States, academic debate persists over the equivalency of human death and brain death. Alan Shewmon showed that the formerly accepted integration rationale was conceptually incomplete by showing that brain-dead patients demonstrated a degree of integration. We provide a more complete rationale for the equivalency of human death and brain death by defending a deeper understanding of the organism as a whole and by using a novel (...)
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  11.  48
    Comparative philosophy and the philosophy of scholarship: on the Western interpretation of Nāgārjuna.Andrew P. Tuck - 1990 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    This study in cross-cultural hermeneutics examines the role that modern, Western philosophy has played in the interpretation of Nagarjuna's Madhyamikakarika, a second-century Indian-Buddhist text. Tuck locates a structure of distinct phases or "styles" in modern, philosophical history. These phases, Tuck shows, exhibit discontinuous interpretive biases, as well as continuity of hermeneutic intention. Discovering in each philosophical era a chaacteristic attitude towards the text--whether privilege, objectivity, or neutrality--Tuck argues that the continual reinterpretation of earlier scholarly readings is in fact at the (...)
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  12.  21
    A transfinite type theory with type variables.P. B. Andrews - 1965 - Amsterdam,: North-Holland Pub. Co..
  13.  59
    Orienting of attention via observed eye gaze is head-centred.Andrew P. Bayliss, Giuseppe di Pellegrino & Steven P. Tipper - 2004 - Cognition 94 (1):1-10.
    Observing averted eye gaze results in the automatic allocation of attention to the gazed-at location. The role of the orientation of the face that produces the gaze cue was investigated. The eyes in the face could look left or right in a head-centred frame, but the face itself could be oriented 90 degrees clockwise or anticlockwise such that the eyes were gazing up or down. Significant cueing effects to targets presented to the left or right of the screen were found (...)
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  14.  24
    On owning silence: Talk, texts, and the semiotics of bibliographies.Andrew P. Carlin - 2003 - Semiotica 2003 (146):117-138.
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  15.  10
    Teaching and learning moments as subjectively problematic: Foundational assumptions and methodological entailments.Andrew P. Carlin & Ricardo Moutinho - 2022 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 54 (1):48-60.
    This article takes a conceptual approach to an issue of pedagogical relevance—the presence of teaching and learning moments within educational environments. We suggest sources of philosophical confusions that design patterns for the classification and creation of typologies of classroom events. We identify three foundational assumptions with the way in which classroom events are analyzed: Describing a classroom event ; Devising a procedure for co-classifying events ; Repurposing decontextualized events to fit a preferred analytic model. Hitherto these assumptions have obscured the (...)
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  16.  81
    On Killing Threats as a Means.Andrew P. Ross - 2015 - Philosophia 43 (3):869-876.
    Jonathan Quong Ethics, 119, 507–537 has recently argued that the permissibility of killing innocent threats turns on a distinction between eliminative and opportunistic agency. When we kill bystanders we view them under the guise of opportunism by using them as mere survival tools, but when we kill threats we simply eliminate them. According to Quong, the distinction between opportunistic and eliminative agency reveals that there are two different ways of killing someone as a means to save your own life. Call (...)
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  17.  53
    The effect of grain boundaries on the electrical resistivity of polycrystalline copper and aluminium.P. V. Andrews, M. B. West & C. R. Robeson - 1969 - Philosophical Magazine 19 (161):887-898.
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  18.  33
    The neural substrates of recollection and familiarity.Andrew P. Yonelinas, Neal E. A. Kroll, Ian G. Dobbins, Michele Lazzara & Robert T. Knight - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):468-469.
    Aggleton & Brown argue that a hippocampal-anterior thalamic system supports the “recollection” of contextual information about previous events, and that a separate perirhinal-medial dorsal thalamic system supports detection of stimulus “familiarity.” Although there is a growing body of human literature that is in agreement with these claims, when recollection and familiarity have been examined in amnesics using the process dissociation or the remember/know procedures, the results do not seem to provide consistent support. We reexamine these studies and describe the results (...)
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  19.  23
    Husserl on knowing essences: Transworld identity and epistemic progression.Andrew P. Butler - forthcoming - European Journal of Philosophy.
    Husserl's proposed method for knowing the essences of universals, which he calls “free variation,” has been widely criticized for involving viciously circular reasoning. In this paper, I review existing attempts to resolve this problem, and I argue that they all fail. I then show that extant accounts are all guilty of a common mistake: they assume that circularity is inevitable as long as the exercise of free variation presupposes the ability to identify the universal whose essence is in question, that (...)
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  20.  33
    Telling it Like it Was: Historical Narratives on Their Own Terms.Andrew P. Norman - 1991 - History and Theory 30 (2):119-135.
    Sweeping denials of the story's capacity to accurately reflect the past are ever catalyzing equally misleading global affirmations. The impositionalists, such as theorist Hayden White, view historical narratives as imposing a falsifying narrative structure on the past, and conclude that narratives cannot be true. Plot-reifiers, such as Alasdair MacIntyre, David Carr, and Frederick Olafson, posit that the past is already narratively structured; historical plots are reified in order for there to be something in the world to which narrative structures can (...)
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  21.  15
    Recovering surface shape and orientation from texture.Andrew P. Witkin - 1981 - Artificial Intelligence 17 (1-3):17-45.
  22.  16
    Classification of afferents by input not by output?P. L. R. Andrews & I. N. C. Lawes - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (2):300-301.
  23.  22
    REVIEWS-An introduction to mathematical logic and type theory: To truth through proof.P. B. Andrews & Mitsuru Yasuhara - 2003 - Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 9 (3):408.
  24.  25
    On the Spot Ethical Decision-Making in CBRN (Chemical, Biological, Radiological or Nuclear Event) Response.Andrew P. Rebera & Chaim Rafalowski - 2014 - Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (3):735-752.
    First responders to chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear (CBRN) events face decisions having significant human consequences. Some operational decisions are supported by standard operating procedures, yet these may not suffice for ethical decisions. Responders will be forced to weigh their options, factoring-in contextual peculiarities; they will require guidance on how they can approach novel (indeed unique) ethical problems: they need strategies for “on the spot” ethical decision making. The primary aim of this paper is to examine how first responders should (...)
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  25.  89
    Epistemological contextualism: Its past, present, and prospects.Andrew P. Norman - 1999 - Philosophia 27 (3-4):383-418.
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  26.  69
    Whither adaptation?Andrew P. Hendry & Andrew Gonzalez - 2008 - Biology and Philosophy 23 (5):673-699.
    The two authors of this paper have diametrically opposed views of the prevalence and strength of adaptation in nature. Hendry believes that adaptation can be seen almost everywhere and that evidence for it is overwhelming and ubiquitous. Gonzalez believes that adaptation is uncommon and that evidence for it is ambiguous at best. Neither author is certifiable to the knowledge of the other, leaving each to wonder where the other has his head buried. Extensive argument has revealed that each author thinks (...)
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  27.  22
    Argument Grayeve Elegije: označavajući pojmovi, singularni termini i istinosnovrijednosna ovisnost.Andrew P. Rebera - 2009 - Prolegomena 8 (2):207-232.
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  28.  5
    Premature consent and patient duties.Andrew P. Rebera & Dimitris Dimitriou - 2021 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 24 (4):701-709.
    This paper addresses the problem of ‘premature consent’. The term ‘premature consent’ denotes patient decisions that are: formulated prior to discussion with the appropriate healthcare professional ; based on information from unreliable sources ; and resolutely maintained despite the HCP having provided alternative reliable information. HCPs are not obliged to respect premature consent patients’ demands for unindicated treatments. But why? What is it that premature consent patients do or get wrong? Davis has argued that premature consent patients are incompetent and (...)
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  29.  36
    Societal and Ethical Implications of Anti-Spoofing Technologies in Biometrics.Andrew P. Rebera, Matteo E. Bonfanti & Silvia Venier - 2014 - Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (1):155-169.
    Biometric identification is thought to be less vulnerable to fraud and forgery than are traditional forms of identification. However biometric identification is not without vulnerabilities. In a ‘spoofing attack’ an artificial replica of an individual’s biometric trait is used to induce a system to falsely infer that individual’s presence. Techniques such as liveness-detection and multi-modality, as well as the development of new and emerging modalities, are intended to secure biometric identification systems against such threats. Unlike biometrics in general, the societal (...)
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  30.  35
    Concepts of process in social science explanations.Andrew P. Vayda, Bonnie J. McCay & Cristina Eghenter - 1991 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 21 (3):318-331.
    Social scientists using one or another concept of process have paid little attention to underlying issues of methodology and explanation. Commonly, the concept used is a loose one. When it is not, there often are other problems, such as errors of reification and of assuming that events sometimes connected in a sequence are invariably thus connected. While it may be useful to retain the term " process" for some sequences of intelligibly connected actions and events, causal explanation must be sought (...)
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  31.  20
    Ducks don't sing.Andrew P. King & Meredith J. West - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):638-639.
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  32.  38
    Inviolability and Interpersonal Morality.Andrew P. Ross - 2016 - Journal of Value Inquiry 50 (1):69-82.
    Introduction Non-consequentialists often attempt to capture a familiar, if slightly elusive, sense of moral wrongness. In particular, many non-consequentialists give a central role to the idea that there is a distinction to be made between acting wrongly and wronging someone. To explain, consider the difference between my duty not to trample sunflowers and my duty not to trample you. In the case of sunflowers, I might act wrongly in trampling them without good reason, but it does not seem that I (...)
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  33.  19
    Maternal Adiposity Influences Neonatal Brain Functional Connectivity.Andrew P. Salzwedel, Wei Gao, Aline Andres, Thomas M. Badger, Charles M. Glasier, Raghu H. Ramakrishnaiah, Amy C. Rowell & Xiawei Ou - 2019 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 12.
  34.  37
    On Some Limits of Interdisciplinarity.Andrew P. Carlin - 2016 - Social Epistemology 30 (5-6):624-642.
    This paper examines the use of “literature” in research projects in Sociology and Library & Information Science and proposes that there are some limits to the programme of interdisciplinarity. The loci of considerations are found in literature review sections of published articles. “The literature” is an arbitrary term that refers to recognized and relevant collections of work according to context. Associating aspects of disciplinary work such as concepts, methods and writings, with Wes Sharrock’s ethnomethodological notion of “ownership”, affords analysis of (...)
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  35.  20
    It is Dangerous to Be Right When the Government is Wrong: The Case for Personal Freedom.Andrew P. Napolitano - 2011 - Nashville: Thomas Nelson.
    Introduction: where do our rights come from? -- Jefferson's masterpiece: the Declaration of Independence -- Get off my land : the right to own property -- Names will never hurt me : the freedom of speech -- I left my rights in San Franscisco : the freedom of association -- You can leave any time you want: the freedom to travel -- You can leave me alone : the right to privacy -- That flesh is mine : you own your (...)
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  36.  27
    Current issues in social science explanation an introduction.Andrew P. Vayda - 1991 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 21 (3):317-317.
  37.  31
    Failures of explanation in Darwinian ecological anthropology: Part II.Andrew P. Vayda - 1995 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 25 (3):360-375.
    Eric Alden Smith and Bruce Winterhalder, eds., Evolutionary Ecology and Human Behavior. Aldine de Gruyter, New York, 1992. Pp. xv, 470, tables, boxes, figures, bibliography, author index, subject index, $59.95 (cloth), $29.95 (paper).
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  38. Failures of explanation in Darwinian ecological anthropology. I.Andrew P. Vayda - 1995 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 25 (2):219-249.
  39.  20
    Attraction as a function of similarity of perceptual judgments.Andrew P. Schettino & Willa B. Baldwin - 1974 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 3 (5):350-352.
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  40. Crisis, austerity and methodenstreit: Postgraduate education in canada a la fun du siecle.Andrew P. Lyons - 1990 - Nexus 7 (1):2.
     
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  41. Savages, Infants, and the Sexuality of Others: Countertransference in Malinowski and Mead.Andrew P. Lyons & Harriet D. Lyons - 1997 - Common Knowledge 6:73-98.
     
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  42.  12
    How Humans Influence Evolution on Adaptive Landscapes.Andrew P. Hendry, Virginie Millien & Andrew Gonzalez - 2012 - In E. Svensson & R. Calsbeek (eds.), The Adaptive Landscape in Evolutionary Biology. Oxford University Press. pp. 180.
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  43.  25
    Making Philosophy Personal.Andrew P. Mills - 2023 - Teaching Philosophy 46 (4):507-530.
    Reflective journals are characterized by their expressive freedom and their intent that students explicitly connect course material to their own life experiences, emotions, beliefs, and feelings. Drawing on research on the use of reflective journals and on the reflections of students in my philosophy courses, I demonstrate how philosophy professors can use reflective journals as a tool to help their students achieve important learning outcomes. By making philosophy personal for students, reflective journals allow students to practice philosophy as a way (...)
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  44.  13
    Adhocism: The Case for Improvisation.Andrew P. Tuck - 2017 - Common Knowledge 23 (1):109-109.
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  45.  63
    Ocean of Reasoning: A Great Commentary on Nagarjuna's Mulamadhyamakakarika.Andrew P. Tuck - 2009 - Common Knowledge 15 (3):505-505.
  46.  27
    The Domain of Constant Excess: Plural Worship at the Munnesvaram Temples in Sri Lanka.Andrew P. Tuck - 2004 - Common Knowledge 10 (1):159-160.
  47.  8
    The Domain of Constant Excess: Plural Worship at the Munnesvaram Temples in Sri Lanka by Rohan Bastin.Andrew P. Tuck - 2019 - Common Knowledge 25 (1-3):463-464.
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  48.  23
    The Journals of Spalding Gray.Andrew P. Tuck - 2013 - Common Knowledge 19 (2):385-385.
  49.  23
    The Journals of Spalding Gray ed. by Nell Casey (review).Andrew P. Tuck - 2013 - Common Knowledge 19 (2):385-385.
  50. The Logic of Events: An Introduction to a Philosophy of Time.Andrew P. Uchenko - 1929 - University of California Publications in Philosophy 12 (1):1-180.
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