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  1.  25
    Hoping for More: The Influence of Outcome Desirability on Information Seeking and Predictions About Relative Quantities.Aaron M. Scherer, Paul D. Windschitl, Jillian O’Rourke & Andrew R. Smith - 2012 - Cognition 125 (1):113-117.
  2. Recovering Pragmatism's Voice: The Classical Tradition, Rorty, and the Philosophy of Communication.Lenore Langsdorf & Andrew R. Smith - 1995 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 31 (4):931-936.
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  3. People Express More Bias in Their Predictions Than in Their Likelihood Judgments.Inkyung Park, Paul D. Windschitl, Jane E. Miller, Andrew R. Smith, Jillian O'Rourke Stuart & Mark Biangmano - forthcoming - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General.
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  4. The Desirability Bias in Predictions Under Aleatory and Epistemic Uncertainty.Paul D. Windschitl, Jane E. Miller, Inkyung Park, Shanon Rule, Ashley Clary & Andrew R. Smith - 2022 - Cognition 229:105254.
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  5.  14
    Risk It? Direct and Collateral Impacts of Peers' Verbal Expressions About Hazard Likelihoods.Paul D. Windschitl, Andrew R. Smith, Aaron M. Scherer & Jerry Suls - 2017 - Thinking and Reasoning 23 (3):259-291.
    When people encounter potential hazards, their expectations and behaviours can be shaped by a variety of factors including other people's expressions of verbal likelihood. What is the impact of such expressions when a person also has numeric likelihood estimates from the same source? Two studies used a new task involving an abstract virtual environment in which people learned about and reacted to novel hazards. Verbal expressions attributed to peers influenced participants’ behaviour toward hazards even when numeric estimates were also available. (...)
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  6.  4
    An Integrated Approach to Biases in Referent-Specific Judgments.Andrew R. Smith, Paul D. Windschitl & Jason P. Rose - 2020 - Thinking and Reasoning 26 (4):581-614.
    Judgments of direct comparisons, probabilities, proportions, and ranks can all be considered referent-specific judgments, for which a good estimate requires a target to be compared against...
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  7.  9
    Recovering Pragmatism's Voice: The Classical Tradition, Rorty, and the Philosophy of Communication.Lenore Langsdorf & Andrew R. Smith (eds.) - 1994 - State University of New York Press.
    This book focuses on what pragmatism tells us about the nature and function of communication.
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  8.  6
    Sources of Bias in Peoples’ Social-Comparative Estimates of Food Consumption.Aaron M. Scherer, Kathryn Bruchmann, Paul D. Windschitl, Jason P. Rose, Andrew R. Smith, Bryan Koestner, Linda Snetselaar & Jerry Suls - 2016 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 22 (2):173-183.
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  9.  20
    Phrasing, Linking, Judging: Communication and Critical Phenomenology. [REVIEW]Andrew R. Smith - 1994 - Human Studies 17 (1):139 - 161.
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  10.  25
    Signifying Harassment: Communication, Ambiguity and Power. [REVIEW]Andrew R. Smith & Jacqueline M. Martinez - 1995 - Human Studies 18 (1):63 - 87.
    This essay reports on phenomenological research conducted with people who describe having been harassed, having been accused of harassment, and/or having mediated or adjudicated harassment disputes. The authors review recent legal conceptions of sexual harassment and articulate a methodology for analyzing individual narrative accounts. The analysis of six selected interviews (three alleged harassers and three declared harassees) depicts how, through discourse with others, persons in ambiguous cases of harassment come to perceive themselves as harassers or harasseesgradually, how intention is inferred (...)
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