17 found
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  1.  32
    Scientific knowledge suppresses but does not supplant earlier intuitions.Andrew Shtulman & Joshua Valcarcel - 2012 - Cognition 124 (2):209-215.
  2.  20
    Science Is Awe-Some: The Emotional Antecedents of Science Learning.Piercarlo Valdesolo, Andrew Shtulman & Andrew S. Baron - 2017 - Emotion Review 9 (3):215-221.
    Scientists from Einstein to Sagan have linked emotions like awe with the motivation for scientific inquiry, but no research has tested this possibility. Theoretical and empirical work from affective science, however, suggests that awe might be unique in motivating explanation and exploration of the physical world. We synthesize theories of awe with theories of the cognitive mechanisms related to learning, and offer a generative theoretical framework that can be used to test the effect of this emotion on early science learning.
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  3.  47
    Tensions Between Science and Intuition Across the Lifespan.Andrew Shtulman & Kelsey Harrington - 2016 - Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (1):118-137.
    The scientific knowledge needed to engage with policy issues like climate change, vaccination, and stem cell research often conflicts with our intuitive theories of the world. How resilient are our intuitive theories in the face of contradictory scientific knowledge? Here, we present evidence that intuitive theories in 10 domains of knowledge—astronomy, evolution, fractions, genetics, germs, matter, mechanics, physiology, thermodynamics, and waves—persist more than four decades beyond the acquisition of a mutually exclusive scientific theory. Participants were asked to verify two types (...)
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  4.  9
    The Relation Between Essentialist Beliefs and Evolutionary Reasoning.Andrew Shtulman & Laura Schulz - 2008 - Cognitive Science 32 (6):1049-1062.
  5.  37
    Attributes of God: Conceptual Foundations of a Foundational Belief.Andrew Shtulman & Marjaana Lindeman - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (3):635-670.
    Anthropomorphism, or the attribution of human properties to nonhuman entities, is often posited as an explanation for the origin and nature of God concepts, but it remains unclear which human properties we tend to attribute to God and under what conditions. In three studies, participants decided whether two types of human properties—psychological properties and physiological properties—could or could not be attributed to God. In Study 1, participants made significantly more psychological attributions than physiological attributions, and the frequency of those attributions (...)
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  6.  5
    Competing Explanations of Competing Explanations: Accounting for Conflict Between Scientific and Folk Explanations.Andrew Shtulman & Cristine H. Legare - 2020 - Topics in Cognitive Science 12 (4):1337-1362.
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  7.  23
    How Lay Cognition Constrains Scientific Cognition.Andrew Shtulman - 2015 - Philosophy Compass 10 (11):785-798.
    Scientific cognition is a hard-won achievement, both from a historical point of view and a developmental point of view. Here, I review seven facets of lay cognition that run counter to, and often impede, scientific cognition: incompatible folk theories, missing ontologies, tolerance for shallow explanations, tolerance for contradictory explanations, privileging explanation over empirical data, privileging testimony over empirical data, and misconceiving the nature of science itself. Most of these facets have been investigated independent of the others, and I propose directions (...)
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  8.  1
    The Plausible Impossible: Chinese Adults Hold Graded Notions of Impossibility.Tianwei Gong & Andrew Shtulman - 2021 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 21 (1-2):76-93.
    Events that violate the laws of nature are, by definition, impossible, but recent research suggests that people view some violations as “more impossible” than others. When evaluating the difficulty of magic spells, American adults are influenced by causal considerations that should be irrelevant given the spell’s primary causal violation, judging, for instance, that it would be more difficult to levitate a bowling ball than a basketball even though weight should no longer be a consideration if contact is no longer necessary (...)
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  9.  1
    How Children’s Cognitive Reflection Shapes Their Science Understanding.Andrew G. Young & Andrew Shtulman - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  10.  15
    Editorial: The Psychology of Pseudoscience.Stefaan Blancke, Taner Edis, Johan Braeckman, Sven Ove Hansson, Asheley R. Landrum & Andrew Shtulman - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
  11. Learning, understanding, and acceptance: The case of evolution.Andrew Shtulman & Prassede Calabi - 2008 - In B. C. Love, K. McRae & V. M. Sloutsky (eds.), Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society. pp. 235--240.
     
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  12. Imagination is only as rational as the purpose to which it is put.Andrew Shtulman & Ruth Mj Byrne - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (5):465-465.
    Byrne's criteria for considering imagination rational do not accord with standard notions of rationality. A different criterion is offered and illustrated with recent work on possibility judgment. This analysis suggests that, although imagination can be put to rational purposes, imagination itself should not be considered rational.
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  13.  2
    Minds, bodies, spirits, and gods: Does widespread belief in disembodied beings imply that we are inherent dualists?Michael Barlev & Andrew Shtulman - 2021 - Psychological Review 128 (6):1007-1021.
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  14. Scienceblind: why our intuitive theories about the world are so often wrong.Andrew Shtulman - 2017 - New York: Basic Books.
    Why we get the world wrong -- Intuitive theories of the physical world -- Matter : what is the world made of? How do those components interact? -- Energy : what makes something hot? What makes something loud? -- Gravity : what makes something heavy? What makes something fall? -- Motion : what makes objects move? What paths do moving objects take? -- Cosmos : what is the shape of our world? What is its place in the cosmos? -- Earth (...)
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  15.  2
    The Development of Cognitive Reflection in China.Tianwei Gong, Andrew G. Young & Andrew Shtulman - 2021 - Cognitive Science 45 (4):e12966.
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  16.  6
    What Is More Informative in the History of Science, the Signal or the Noise?Andrew Shtulman - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (4):842-845.
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  17. The familiar appeal of imaginary worlds.Andrew Shtulman - 2022 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 45:e298.
    Imaginary worlds may satisfy our need to explore, but it's an open question what we are searching for. Research on imagination suggests that if we are searching for something extraordinary – something that violates our intuitions about real-world causality – then we seek it in small doses and in contexts that ultimately confirm our intuitions. Imaginary worlds allow for true novelty, but we may actually prefer ideas that are novel on their surface but familiar at their core.
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