16 found
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  1. Conflict of Interest in the Professions.Michael Davis & Andrew Stark (eds.) - 2001 - Oxford University Press.
    Conflicts of interest pose special problems for the professions. Even the appearance of a conflict of interest can undermine essential trust between professional and public. This volume is a comprehensive and accessible guide to the ramifications and problems associated with important issue. It contains fifteen new essays by noted scholars and covers topics in law, medicine, journalism, engineering, financial services, and others.
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  2.  4
    Inverting Donaldson’s Framework: A Managerial Approach To International Conflicts Of Cultural And Economic Norms.Andrew Stark - 2015 - Business Ethics Quarterly 25 (4):535-558.
    ABSTRACT:Thomas Donaldson’s framework for dealing with value-conflicts between a manager’s home and host country distinguishes between a “conflict of relative [economic] development”—conflicting norms that arise because home and host are at two different stages of economic development—and a “conflict of culture,” which arises because the home and host’s different cultures generate conflicting norms on the issue the manager faces. My question here is a thought experiment. What different insights might emerge if we flipped Donaldson’s framework around? Specifically: What if we (...)
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  3. Business in Politics : Lobbying and Corporate Campaign Contributions.Andrew Stark - 2010 - In George G. Brenkert & Tom L. Beauchamp (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Business Ethics. Oxford University Press.
     
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  4.  80
    Benefit Versus Numbers Versus Helping the Worst-Off: An Alternative to the Prevalent Approach to the Just Distribution of Resources.Andrew Stark - 2008 - Utilitas 20 (3):356-382.
    A central strand in philosophical debate over the just distribution of resources attempts to juggle three competing imperatives: helping those who are worst off, helping those who will benefit the most, and then – beyond this – determining when to aggregate such ‘worst off’ and ‘benefit’ claims, and when instead to treat no such claim as greater than that which any individual by herself can exert. Yet as various philosophers have observed, ‘we have no satisfactory theoretical characterization’ as to how (...)
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  5.  27
    Beyond Choice.Andrew Stark - 2002 - Political Theory 30 (1):36-67.
  6.  36
    Response to a Rejoinder.Andrew Stark - 1993 - The Society for Business Ethics Newsletter 4 (3):12-15.
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  7. Beyond Choice: Rethinking the Post-Rawlsian Debate Over Egalitarian Justice.Andrew Stark - 2002 - Philosophy Today 30 (1):36-67.
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  8.  19
    The Trolley’s Last Stop Before Consequentialism: Exploring the Terrain.Andrew Stark - 2017 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 20 (5):1021-1035.
    The doctrine of double effect and the many other principles that philosophers have advanced to remedy the doctrine’s defects were meant, in the words of Warren Quinn, "to capture certain kinds of fairly common intuitions about [a set of canonical] pairs of cases." Both cases in each pair “have the same consequential profile,” in that "agents bring about the same good result at the same cost in lives lost or harm suffered." But they exhibit differing deontological characteristics, leading the “common (...)
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  9. Why Are (Some) Conflicts of Interests in Medicine so Uniquely Vexing?Andrew Stark - 2005 - In Don A. Moore (ed.), Conflicts of Interest: Challenges and Solutions in Business, Law, Medicine, and Public Policy. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  10.  34
    Don’T Change the Subject: Interpreting Public Discourse Over Quid Pro Quo.Andrew Stark - 1997 - Business Ethics Quarterly 7 (3):93-116.
    A quid pro quo is an exchange of value between a citizen or group—often a businessperson or organization—and an official; whatthe citizen or group offers can take either monetary or nonmonetary form and what the official supplies, in return, is some kind of public act. Despite the fact that instances of quid pro quo seem continually to compel public attention, very few rise to the level of bribery; i.e., the level in which they are resolved judicially. In part, quid pro (...)
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  11.  25
    Don’T Change the Subject: Interpreting Public Discourse Over Quid Pro Quo.Andrew Stark - 1997 - Business Ethics Quarterly 7 (3):93-116.
    A quid pro quo is an exchange of value between a citizen or group—often a businessperson or organization—and an official; whatthe citizen or group offers can take either monetary or nonmonetary form and what the official supplies, in return, is some kind of public act. Despite the fact that instances of quid pro quo seem continually to compel public attention, very few rise to the level of bribery; i.e., the level in which they are resolved judicially. In part, quid pro (...)
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  12.  5
    Limousine Liberals, Welfare Conservatives.Andrew Stark - 1997 - Political Theory 25 (4):475-501.
  13.  20
    Global Justice, Historical Justice.Andrew Stark - 2012 - Political Theory 40 (5):543-572.
    The debates over global and historical justice much preoccupy contemporary political theory. Yet they have not been analyzed in tandem. And this, despite the fact that a number of theoretical frameworks, principal among them contractarianism and utilitarianism, configure arguments in both debates. In this essay, I show that such arguments, as advanced by either side in each of the two debates, all rest on a set of patterned assumptions about the nature of the self. Specifically, I argue, the debates over (...)
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  14.  40
    The Appearance of Official Impropriety and the Concept of Political Crime.Andrew Stark - 1995 - Ethics 105 (2):326-351.
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  15. The Consolations of Mortality: Making Sense of Death.Andrew Stark - 2016 - Yale University Press.
    _A penetrating and provocative exploration of human mortality, from Epicurus to Joan Didion_ For those who don’t believe in an afterlife, the wisdom of the ages offers four great consolations for mortality: that death is benign and good; that mortal life provides its own kind of immortality; that true immortality would be awful; and that we experience the kinds of losses in life that we will eventually face in death. Can any of these consolations honestly reconcile us to our inevitable (...)
     
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  16.  13
    The Limits of Medicine.Andrew Stark - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    What are the final limits of medicine? What should we not try to cure medically, even if we had the necessary financial resources and technology? This book philosophically addresses these questions by examining two mirror-image debates in tandem. Members of certain groups, who are deemed by traditional standards to have a medical condition, such as deafness, obesity, or anorexia, argue that they have created their own cultures and ways of life. Curing their conditions would be a form of genocide. Members (...)
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