Results for 'Andrew T. Brei'

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  1.  29
    Rights & Nature.Andrew T. Brei - 2013 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (2):393-408.
    Due to the significant and often careless human impact on the natural environment, there are serious problems facing the people of today and of future generations. To date, ethical, aesthetic, religious, and economic arguments for the conservation and protection of the natural environment have made relatively little headway. Another approach, one capable of garnering attention and motivating action, would be welcome. There is another approach, one that I will call a rights approach. Speaking generally, this approach is an attempt to (...)
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  2. Ecology, Ethics and Hope.Andrew T. Brei (ed.) - 2015 - Rowman & Littlefield International.
    This volume brings together essays written at the cutting edge of an emerging sub-field of environmental philosophy, relating to the nature and role of hope.
     
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  3.  13
    Complementarianism: An Apology of Sorts.Andrew Brei - 2014 - Southwest Philosophy Review 30 (2):55-56.
    Unfortunately, we are heirs to a history which has conditioned us to a remarkable extent. In every time and place, this conditioning has been an obstacle to the progress of women. Women’s dignity has often been unacknowledged and their prerogatives misrepresented; they have often been relegated to the margins of society and even reduced to servitude. This has prevented women from truly being themselves and it has resulted in a spiritual impoverishment of humanity.
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  4. The Art of Knowing One-Self: Or, an Enquiry Into the Sources of Morality [Tr. By T.W.].Jacques Abbadie & W. T. - 1695
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  5. LAGUNA, T. DE.-Introduction to the Study of Ethics. [REVIEW]A. E. T. - 1915 - Mind 24:421.
     
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  6. An Account of the Life and Writings of Mr. John Locke [by J. Le Clerc, Tr. By T.F.P.].Jean Le Clerc & F. P. T. - 1713
     
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  7. An Account of the Life and Writings of Mr. John Locke [by J. Le Clerc, Tr. By T.F.P.]. [Followed by] the Last Will and Testament of John Locke. [REVIEW]Jean Le Clerc & F. P. T. - 1714
     
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  8. The Life and Character of Mr. John Locke. Done Into Engl. By T.F.P.Jean Le Clerc & F. P. T. - 1706
     
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  9. A Dialogue Between Mr. Merriman, and Dr. Chymist: Concerning John Sergents Paradoxes, in His New Method to Science, and His Solid Philosophy. By T.W. [REVIEW]W. T. - 1698 - [S.N.].
     
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  10. NUNN, T. P. -The Aim and Achievements of Scientific Method. [REVIEW]L. T. L. T. - 1908 - Mind 17:274.
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  11.  1
    Guillelmus de Luxi, Guillelmi de Luxi Postilla super Baruch, Postilla super Ionam, ed. Andrew T. Sulavik. Turnhout: Brepols, 2006. Pp. xcii, 178; 1 chart and tables. €125. [REVIEW]Riccardo Quinto - 2008 - Speculum 83 (4):998-999.
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  12. Born of a Virgin? Reconceiving Jesus in the Bible, Tradition and Theology. By Andrew T. Lincoln. Pp. Xii, 322, London, SPCK, 2013, $22.72. [REVIEW]Patrick Madigan - 2017 - Heythrop Journal 58 (2):335-336.
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  13. Guillelmi de Luxi Postilla super Baruch, Postilla super IonamGuillelmus de Luxi Andrew T. Sulavik.Riccardo Quinto - 2008 - Speculum 83 (4):998-999.
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  14. Museums of Madness: The Social Organization of Insanity in Nineteenth-Century England by Andrew T. Scull. [REVIEW]Roger Smith - 1980 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 71:328-328.
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  15. Nineteenth Century Museums of Madness: The Social Organization of Insanity in Nineteenth-Century England. By Andrew T. Scull. London: Allen Lane, 1979. Pp. 275. £8.50. [REVIEW]John K. Walton - 1981 - British Journal for the History of Science 14 (1):94.
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  16.  26
    Joseph Chamberlain: Entrepreneur in Politics, by Peter T. Marsh; Younghusband: The Last Great Imperial Adventurer, by Patrick French; and Rabindranath Tagore: The Myriad-Minded Man, by Krishna Dutta and Andrew Robinson.John Coates - 1996 - The Chesterton Review 22 (1/2):158-167.
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  17.  24
    Andrew Oliver and K. T. Luckner: Silver for the Gods, 800 Years of Greek and Roman Silver. Pp. 175; 119 Plates. Toledo, Ohio: Toledo Museum of Art, 1977. Paper. [REVIEW]Malcolm A. R. Colledge - 1979 - The Classical Review 29 (01):185-.
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  18.  1
    The Freedom to Become a Christian. A Kierkegaardian Account of Human Transformation in Relationship with God, by Andrew B. Torrance, London, Bloomsbury T&T Clark, 2016, 217 + X Pp, £69.99, ISBN 9780567661203. [REVIEW]Rob Compaijen - 2016 - International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 77 (1-2):77-78.
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  19.  1
    Vulnerability and Care. Christian Reflections on the Philosophy of Medicine, by Andrew Sloane, Bloomsbury, T&T Clark Theology, 2016, Vii+211 Pp., $ 112 , ISBN 9780567316776. [REVIEW]Kristien Hens - 2016 - International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 77 (1-2):70-71.
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  20. Review of Swedenborg: Buddha of the North by D. T. Suzuki; Andrew Bernstein. [REVIEW]Barbara Darling-Smith - 1999 - Philosophy East and West 49 (2):231-235.
     
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  21. Is Modern Culture Doomed? By Andrew J. Krzesinski, Ph. D., S. T. D.Victor Mills - 1943 - Franciscan Studies 3 (3):324-325.
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  22. Utilitarianism - Ed. Andrew Bailey.Andrew R. Bailey (ed.) - 2016 - Broadview Press.
    _Utilitarianism_ is a classic work of ethical theory, arguably the most persuasive and comprehensible presentation of this widely influential position. While he didn’t invent utilitarianism, John Stuart Mill offered its clearest expression and strongest defense, and he expanded the theory to account for the variety in quality that we find among pleasures and pains. The complete text of the 1871 edition is included, along with selections from Jeremy Bentham’s An Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation. Andrew Bailey’s (...)
     
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  23.  58
    Why Environmental Ethics Shouldn't Give Up on Intrinsic Value.Katie McShane - 2007 - Environmental Ethics 29 (1):43-61.
    Recent critics (Andrew Light, Bryan Norton, Anthony Weston, and Bruce Morito, among others) have argued that we should give up talk of intrinsic value in general and that of nature in particular. While earlier theorists might have overestimated the importance of intrinsic value, these recent critics underestimate its importance. Claims about a thing’s intrinsic value are claims about the distinctive way in which we have reason to care about that thing. If we understand intrinsic value in this manner, we (...)
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  24. You Needn't Be Simple.Andrew M. Bailey - 2014 - Philosophical Papers 43 (2):145-160.
    Here's an interesting question: what are we? David Barnett has claimed that reflection on consciousness suggests an answer: we are simple. Barnett argues that the mereological simplicity of conscious beings best explains the Datum: that no pair of persons can itself be conscious. In this paper, I offer two alternative explanations of the Datum. If either is correct, Barnett's argument fails. First, there aren't any such things as pairs of persons. Second, consciousness is maximal; no conscious thing is a proper (...)
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  25. You Don't Have to Do What's Best! (A Problem for Consequentialists and Other Teleologists).S. Andrew Schroeder - 2011 - In Mark Timmons (ed.), Oxford Studies in Normative Ethics, vol. 1. Oxford University Press.
    Define teleology as the view that requirements hold in virtue of facts about value or goodness. Teleological views are quite popular, and in fact some philosophers (e.g. Dreier, Smith) argue that all (plausible) moral theories can be understood teleologically. I argue, however, that certain well-known cases show that the teleologist must at minimum assume that there are certain facts that an agent ought to know, and that this means that requirements can't, in general, hold in virtue of facts about value (...)
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  26.  26
    B Remembers That P From Time T.Andrew Naylor - 1971 - Journal of Philosophy 68 (2):29-41.
    For cases in which to remember that p is to have (strict) nonbasic, unmixed memory knowledge that p; in which there is at most one prior time, t, from which one remembers; in which one knew at t that p; and in which there can arise a sensible question whether one remembers that p from t — a person, B, remembers that p from t if and only if: (1) There is a set of grounds a subset of which consists (...)
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  27.  5
    Can ‘Sensibility’ Be Re-‘Associated’? Reflections on T.S. Eliot and the Possibility of Educating for a Sustainable Environment.Andrew Stables - 2008 - Ethics and Education 3 (2):161-170.
    The paper considers T.S. Eliot's 'dissociation of sensibility' thesis, considering its philosophical value and attempting to defend it against published objections. While accepting some of the criticisms, it is argued that Eliot's argument is sound to a significant extent. Eliot's account retains explanatory power with regard to an enduring arts-science divide in schooling and, more broadly, in environmental ethics. In both these areas, educators can, and should, find greater synergies between arts and science, and theoria and praxis, despite continuing pressures (...)
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  28. German Philosophy Today: Between Idealism, Romanticism, and Pragmatism: Andrew Bowie.Andrew Bowie - 1999 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 44:357-398.
    In his essay On the History of Religion and Philosophy in Germany, of 1834, Heinrich Heine suggested to his French audience that the German propensity for ‘metaphysical abstractions’ had led many people to condemn philosophy for its failure to have a practical effect, Germany having only had its revolution in thought, while France had its in reality. Heine, albeit somewhat ironically, refuses to join those who condemn philosophy: ‘German philosophy is an important matter, which concerns the whole of humanity, and (...)
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  29. Metaphysics and Ethics in the Philosophy of T.H. Green.Andrew Vincent - 2006 - In Maria Dimova-Cookson & W. J. Mander (eds.), T.H. Green: Ethics, Metaphysics, and Political Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
     
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  30. Why It Doesn't Matter I'm Not Insane: Descartes's Madness Doubt in Focus.Andrew Russo - 2011 - Southwest Philosophy Review 27 (1):157-165.
    Harry Frankfurt has argued that Descartes’s madness doubt in the First Meditation is importantly different from his dreaming doubt. The madness doubt does not provide a reason for doubting the senses since were the meditator to suppose he was mad his ability to successfully complete the philosophical investigation he sets for himself in the first few pages of the Meditations would be undermined. I argue that Frankfurt’s interpretation of Descartes’s madness doubt is mistaken and that it should be understood as (...)
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  31.  29
    Why People Don't Take Their Concerns About Fair Trade to the Supermarket: The Role of Neutralisation. [REVIEW]Andreas Chatzidakis, Sally Hibbert & Andrew P. Smith - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 74 (1):89 - 100.
    This article explores how neutralisation can explain people's lack of commitment to buying Fair Trade (FT) products, even when they identify FT as an ethical concern. It examines the theoretical tenets of neutralisation theory and critically assesses its applicability to the purchase of FT products. Exploratory research provides illustrative examples of neutralisation techniques being used in the FT consumer context. A conceptual framework and research propositions delineate the role of neutralisation in explaining the attitude-behaviour discrepancies evident in relation to consumers' (...)
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  32. What to Do When You Don't Know What to Do.Andrew Sepielli - 2009 - Oxford Studies in Metaethics 4:5-28.
  33. 10. Lucius T. Outlaw, Jr., On Race and Philosophy Lucius T. Outlaw, Jr., On Race and Philosophy (Pp. 454-456).Margaret Gilbert, Andrew Mason, Elizabeth S. Anderson, J. David Velleman, Matthew H. Kramer, Michele M. Moody‐Adams & Martha C. Nussbaum - 1999 - Ethics 109 (2).
     
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  34. What to Do When You Don't Know What to Do When You Don't Know What to Do….Andrew Sepielli - 2013 - Noûs 47 (1):521-544.
  35.  21
    Why Stereotypes Don’T Even Make Good Defaults.Andrew C. Connolly, Jerry A. Fodor, Lila R. Gleitman & Henry Gleitman - 2007 - Cognition 103 (1):1-22.
  36. Free: Why Science Hasn’T Disproved Free Will, by Alfred R. Mele.Andrew Kissel - 2015 - Teaching Philosophy 38 (3):354-358.
  37.  2
    Why People Don’T Take Their Concerns About Fair Trade to the Supermarket: The Role of Neutralisation.Andreas Chatzidakis, Sally Hibbert & Andrew P. Smith - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 74 (1):89-100.
    This article explores how neutralisation can explain people's lack of commitment to buying Fair Trade products, even when they identify FT as an ethical concern. It examines the theoretical tenets of neutralisation theory and critically assesses its applicability to the purchase of FT products. Exploratory research provides illustrative examples of neutralisation techniques being used in the FT consumer context. A conceptual framework and research propositions delineate the role of neutralisation in explaining the attitude-behaviour discrepancies evident in relation to consumers' FT (...)
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  38.  9
    Why Evidentialists Shouldn't Make Evidential Fit Dispositional.Andrew Moon & Pamela Robinson - forthcoming - Syndicate Philosophy.
    Kevin McCain’s Evidentialism and Epistemic Justification is the most thorough defense of evidentialism to date. In this work, McCain proposes insightful new theses to fill in underdeveloped parts of evidentialism. One of these new theses is an explanationist account of evidential fit that appeals to dispositional properties. We argue that this explanationist account faces counterexamples, and that, more generally, explanationists should not understand evidential fit in terms of dispositional properties.
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  39.  75
    The Neuropsychological Basis of Religions, or Why God Won't Go Away.Eugene G. D'Aquili & Andrew B. Newberg - 1998 - Zygon 33 (2):187-201.
  40.  42
    The Neuroscientific Study of Religious and Spiritual Phenomena: Or Why God Doesn't Use Biostatistics.Andrew B. Newberg & Bruce Y. Lee - 2005 - Zygon 40 (2):469-490.
  41. Book Reviews : God and Modernity: A New and Better Way to Do Theology, by Andrew Shanks. London and New York: Routledge, 2000. 187 Pp. Pb. 15.99. ISBN 0-415-22189-. [REVIEW]T. Jenkins - 2001 - Studies in Christian Ethics 14 (2):119-122.
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  42.  76
    Book Review:Constructing Quarks: A Sociological History of Particle Physics Andrew Pickering. [REVIEW]James T. Cushing - 1985 - Philosophy of Science 52 (4):640-.
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  43.  44
    A L a N T U R I N.Andrew Hodges - manuscript
    The text on this website is copyright in the same way as any other publication. It is of course legitimate to make small quotations from it. A link to this site should then be put in to acknowledge the origin of quoted text. For any more substantial use of the material on this site you should ask permission from me. You should also ask my permission to use any of the graphic icons or the images which are marked as being (...)
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  44.  31
    Clear Eyes, Full Hearts, Can't Lose: Friday Night Lights and the Value of Inspiration.Andrew Huddleston & E. Lord - unknown
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  45.  13
    The Hidden Advantage of Tradition: On the Significance of T. S. Eliot's Indic Studies.Jeffrey M. Perl & Andrew P. Tuck - 1985 - Philosophy East and West 35 (2):115-131.
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  46.  2
    Don't Look Now: Attentional Avoidance of Emotionally Valenced Cues.Bundy Mackintosh & Andrew Mathews - 2003 - Cognition and Emotion 17 (4):623-646.
  47.  25
    Don’T Change the Subject: Interpreting Public Discourse Over Quid Pro Quo.Andrew Stark - 1997 - Business Ethics Quarterly 7 (3):93-116.
    A quid pro quo is an exchange of value between a citizen or group—often a businessperson or organization—and an official; whatthe citizen or group offers can take either monetary or nonmonetary form and what the official supplies, in return, is some kind of public act. Despite the fact that instances of quid pro quo seem continually to compel public attention, very few rise to the level of bribery; i.e., the level in which they are resolved judicially. In part, quid pro (...)
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  48.  1
    Why Britain Can't Afford Informed Consent.Robert Schwartz & Andrew Grubb - 1985 - Hastings Center Report 15 (4):19-25.
  49.  26
    Book Review:Quantum Mechanics: Historical Contingency and the Copenhagen Hegemony James T. Cushing. [REVIEW]Andrew Wayne - 1996 - Philosophy of Science 63 (3):478-.
  50.  14
    Don't Change the Subject.Andrew Stark - 1997 - Business Ethics Quarterly 7 (3):93-116.
    A quid pro quo is an exchange of value between a citizen or group—often a businessperson or organization—and an official; whatthe citizen or group offers can take either monetary or nonmonetary form and what the official supplies, in return, is some kind of public act. Despite the fact that instances of quid pro quo seem continually to compel public attention, very few rise to the level of bribery; i.e., the level in which they are resolved judicially. In part, quid pro (...)
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