Results for 'Andrew T. Kopan'

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  1.  20
    Book Review Section 2. [REVIEW]Henrietta Schwartz, Ronald D. Cohen, Shields Jr, Mazoor Ahmed, Albert E. Bender, Paul J. Schafer, Charles S. Ungerleider, Andrew T. Kopan, Joseph Watras, George A. Letchworth, Ronald M. Brown, John H. Walker, Ralph B. Kimbrough, Roy L. Cox & Raymond Martin - unknown
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  2. The Art of Knowing One-Self: Or, an Enquiry Into the Sources of Morality [Tr. By T.W.].Jacques Abbadie & W. T. - 1695
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  3. LAGUNA, T. DE.-Introduction to the Study of Ethics. [REVIEW]A. E. T. - 1915 - Mind 24:421.
     
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  4. An Account of the Life and Writings of Mr. John Locke [by J. Le Clerc, Tr. By T.F.P.].Jean Le Clerc & F. P. T. - 1713
     
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  5. An Account of the Life and Writings of Mr. John Locke [by J. Le Clerc, Tr. By T.F.P.]. [Followed by] the Last Will and Testament of John Locke. [REVIEW]Jean Le Clerc & F. P. T. - 1714
     
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  6. The Life and Character of Mr. John Locke. Done Into Engl. By T.F.P.Jean Le Clerc & F. P. T. - 1706
     
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  7. A Dialogue Between Mr. Merriman, and Dr. Chymist: Concerning John Sergents Paradoxes, in His New Method to Science, and His Solid Philosophy. By T.W. [REVIEW]W. T. - 1698 - [S.N.].
     
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  8. NUNN, T. P. -The Aim and Achievements of Scientific Method. [REVIEW]L. T. L. T. - 1908 - Mind 17:274.
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  9.  9
    Steven M. Cahn and Andrew T. Forechimes, Eds., Principles of Moral Philosophy: Classic and Contemporary Approaches.Steven A. Benko - 2018 - Teaching Ethics 18 (1):104-106.
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  10.  12
    Book Review: Andrew T. Draper, A Theology of Race and Place: Liberation and Reconciliation in the Works of Jennings and Carter. [REVIEW]Ross Halbach - 2018 - Studies in Christian Ethics 31 (1):108-111.
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  11.  16
    Nineteenth Century - Museums of Madness: The Social Organization of Insanity in Nineteenth-Century England. By Andrew T. Scull. London: Allen Lane, 1979. Pp. 275. £8.50. [REVIEW]John Walton - 1981 - British Journal for the History of Science 14 (1):94-96.
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  12.  15
    Guillelmi de Luxi Postilla super Baruch, Postilla super Ionam. Guillelmus de Luxi, Andrew T. Sulavik.Riccardo Quinto - 2008 - Speculum 83 (4):998-999.
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  13.  11
    Born of a Virgin? Reconceiving Jesus in the Bible, Tradition and Theology. By Andrew T. Lincoln. Pp. Xii, 322, London, SPCK, 2013, $22.72. [REVIEW]Patrick Madigan - 2017 - Heythrop Journal 58 (2):335-336.
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  14.  11
    Museums of Madness: The Social Organization of Insanity in Nineteenth-Century England by Andrew T. Scull. [REVIEW]Roger Smith - 1980 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 71:328-328.
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  15.  1
    Reformation, Dissent, and Diversity: The Story of Scotland’s Churches, 1560–1960, by Andrew T. N. Muirhead. [REVIEW]Jowita A. Thor - 2016 - International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 77 (4-5):347-348.
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  16.  11
    Andrew Shanks Hegel and Religious Faith: Divided Brain, Atoning Spirit. New York: T & T Clark, 2011. ISBN 978-0-567-53230-5. Pp. 175. [REVIEW]Cyril O'Regan - 2014 - Hegel Bulletin 35 (1):148-151.
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  17.  6
    Andrew Oliver and K. T. Luckner: Silver for the Gods, 800 Years of Greek and Roman Silver. Pp. 175; 119 Plates. Toledo, Ohio: Toledo Museum of Art, 1977. Paper. [REVIEW]Malcolm Colledge - 1979 - The Classical Review 29 (1):185-185.
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  18.  37
    Joseph Chamberlain: Entrepreneur in Politics, by Peter T. Marsh; Younghusband: The Last Great Imperial Adventurer, by Patrick French; and Rabindranath Tagore: The Myriad-Minded Man, by Krishna Dutta and Andrew Robinson.John Coates - 1996 - The Chesterton Review 22 (1/2):158-167.
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  19.  13
    The Freedom to Become a Christian. A Kierkegaardian Account of Human Transformation in Relationship with God, by Andrew B. Torrance, London, Bloomsbury T&T Clark, 2016, 217 + X Pp, £69.99, ISBN 9780567661203. [REVIEW]Rob Compaijen - 2016 - International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 77 (1-2):77-78.
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  20.  36
    Andrew Oliver and K. T. Luckner: Silver for the Gods, 800 Years of Greek and Roman Silver. Pp. 175; 119 Plates. Toledo, Ohio: Toledo Museum of Art, 1977. Paper. [REVIEW]Malcolm A. R. Colledge - 1979 - The Classical Review 29 (01):185-.
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  21.  11
    Vulnerability and Care. Christian Reflections on the Philosophy of Medicine, by Andrew Sloane, Bloomsbury, T&T Clark Theology, 2016, Vii+211 Pp., $ 112 , ISBN 9780567316776. [REVIEW]Kristien Hens - 2016 - International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 77 (1-2):70-71.
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  22.  2
    Into the Cosmo. Space Exploration and Soviet Culture - Edited by James T. Andrew and Asif A. Siddiqi.Jérôme Lamy - 2013 - Centaurus 55 (1):49-50.
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  23.  9
    Is Modern Culture Doomed? By Andrew J. Krzesinski, Ph. D., S. T. D.Victor Mills - 1943 - Franciscan Studies 3 (3):324-325.
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  24.  2
    Andrew Vincent , The Philosophy of T. H. Green. Avebury Series in Philosophy. Aldershot, Gower, 1986, Pp. Viii, 156.Norbert Waszek - 1989 - Hegel Bulletin 10 (2):45-47.
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  25.  18
    Non-Compliance Shouldn't Be Better.Andrew T. Forcehimes & Luke Semrau - 2018 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 97 (1):46-56.
    ABSTRACTAgent-relative consequentialism is thought attractive because it can secure agent-centred constraints while retaining consequentialism's compelling idea—the idea that it is always permissible to bring about the best available outcome. We argue, however, that the commitments of agent-relative consequentialism lead it to run afoul of a plausibility requirement on moral theories. A moral theory must not be such that, in any possible circumstance, were every agent to act impermissibly, each would have more reason to prefer the world thereby actualized over the (...)
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  26.  9
    Actualism Doesn’T Have Control Issues: A Reply to Cohen and Timmerman.Andrew T. Forcehimes & Luke Semrau - 2019 - Philosophia 47 (1):271-277.
    Recently, Cohen and Timmerman, 1–18, 2016) argue that actualism has control issues. The view should be rejected, they claim, as it recognizes a morally irrelevant distinction between counterfactuals over which agents exercise the same kind of control. Here we reply on behalf of actualism.
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  27. Why Environmental Ethics Shouldn’T Give Up on Intrinsic Value.Katie McShane - 2007 - Environmental Ethics 29 (1):43-61.
    Recent critics (Andrew Light, Bryan Norton, Anthony Weston, and Bruce Morito, among others) have argued that we should give up talk of intrinsic value in general and that of nature in particular. While earlier theorists might have overestimated the importance of intrinsic value, these recent critics underestimate its importance. Claims about a thing’s intrinsic value are claims about the distinctive way in which we have reason to care about that thing. If we understand intrinsic value in this manner, we (...)
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  28.  6
    Can’T or Won’T? Immunometabolic Constraints on Dopaminergic Drive.Michael T. Treadway, Jessica A. Cooper & Andrew H. Miller - 2019 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 23 (5):435-448.
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  29. You Needn't Be Simple.Andrew M. Bailey - 2014 - Philosophical Papers 43 (2):145-160.
    Here's an interesting question: what are we? David Barnett has claimed that reflection on consciousness suggests an answer: we are simple. Barnett argues that the mereological simplicity of conscious beings best explains the Datum: that no pair of persons can itself be conscious. In this paper, I offer two alternative explanations of the Datum. If either is correct, Barnett's argument fails. First, there aren't any such things as pairs of persons. Second, consciousness is maximal; no conscious thing is a proper (...)
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  30. You Don't Have to Do What's Best! (A Problem for Consequentialists and Other Teleologists).S. Andrew Schroeder - 2011 - In Mark Timmons (ed.), Oxford Studies in Normative Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    Define teleology as the view that requirements hold in virtue of facts about value or goodness. Teleological views are quite popular, and in fact some philosophers (e.g. Dreier, Smith) argue that all (plausible) moral theories can be understood teleologically. I argue, however, that certain well-known cases show that the teleologist must at minimum assume that there are certain facts that an agent ought to know, and that this means that requirements can't, in general, hold in virtue of facts about value (...)
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  31.  39
    German Philosophy Today: Between Idealism, Romanticism, and Pragmatism: Andrew Bowie.Andrew Bowie - 1999 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 44:357-398.
    In his essay On the History of Religion and Philosophy in Germany, of 1834, Heinrich Heine suggested to his French audience that the German propensity for ‘metaphysical abstractions’ had led many people to condemn philosophy for its failure to have a practical effect, Germany having only had its revolution in thought, while France had its in reality. Heine, albeit somewhat ironically, refuses to join those who condemn philosophy: ‘German philosophy is an important matter, which concerns the whole of humanity, and (...)
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  32.  48
    B Remembers That P From Time T.Andrew Naylor - 1971 - Journal of Philosophy 68 (2):29-41.
    For cases in which to remember that p is to have (strict) nonbasic, unmixed memory knowledge that p; in which there is at most one prior time, t, from which one remembers; in which one knew at t that p; and in which there can arise a sensible question whether one remembers that p from t — a person, B, remembers that p from t if and only if: (1) There is a set of grounds a subset of which consists (...)
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  33.  17
    Can ‘Sensibility’ Be Re-‘Associated’? Reflections on T.S. Eliot and the Possibility of Educating for a Sustainable Environment.Andrew Stables - 2008 - Ethics and Education 3 (2):161-170.
    The paper considers T.S. Eliot's 'dissociation of sensibility' thesis, considering its philosophical value and attempting to defend it against published objections. While accepting some of the criticisms, it is argued that Eliot's argument is sound to a significant extent. Eliot's account retains explanatory power with regard to an enduring arts-science divide in schooling and, more broadly, in environmental ethics. In both these areas, educators can, and should, find greater synergies between arts and science, and theoria and praxis, despite continuing pressures (...)
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  34. Metaphysics and Ethics in the Philosophy of T.H. Green.Andrew Vincent - 2006 - In Maria Dimova-Cookson & W. J. Mander (eds.), T.H. Green: Ethics, Metaphysics, and Political Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
     
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  35. Why It Doesn’T Matter I’M Not Insane: Descartes’s Madness Doubt in Focus.Andrew Russo - 2011 - Southwest Philosophy Review 27 (1):157-165.
    Harry Frankfurt has argued that Descartes’s madness doubt in the First Meditation is importantly different from his dreaming doubt. The madness doubt does not provide a reason for doubting the senses since were the meditator to suppose he was mad his ability to successfully complete the philosophical investigation he sets for himself in the first few pages of the Meditations would be undermined. I argue that Frankfurt’s interpretation of Descartes’s madness doubt is mistaken and that it should be understood as (...)
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  36.  51
    Noumenal Ignorance: Why, For Kant, Can't We Know Things in Themselves?Alejandro Naranjo Sandoval & Andrew Chignell - 2017 - In Matthew Altman (ed.), The Palgrave Companion to Kant. London: Palgrave Macmillan UK. pp. 91-116.
    In this paper we look at a few of the most prominent ways of articulating Kant’s critical argument for Noumenal Ignorance — i.e., the claim that we cannot cognize or have knowledge of any substantive, synthetic truths about things-in-themselves — and then provide two different accounts of our own.
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  37. What to Do When You Don't Know What to Do.Andrew Sepielli - 2009 - Oxford Studies in Metaethics 4:5-28.
  38. What to Do When You Don't Know What to Do When You Don't Know What to Do….Andrew Sepielli - 2013 - Noûs 47 (1):521-544.
  39.  6
    This Isn’T the Free Will Worth Looking For: General Free Will Beliefs Do Not Influence Moral Judgments, Agent-Specific Choice Ascriptions Do.Andrew E. Monroe, Garrett L. Brady & Bertram F. Malle - 2016 - Social Psychological and Personality Science 8 (2):191-199.
    According to previous research, threatening people’s belief in free will may undermine moral judgments and behavior. Four studies tested this claim. Study 1 used a Velten technique to threaten people’s belief in free will and found no effects on moral behavior, judgments of blame, and punishment decisions. Study 2 used six different threats to free will and failed to find effects on judgments of blame and wrongness. Study 3 found no effects on moral judgment when manipulating general free will beliefs (...)
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  40.  47
    Why People Don’T Take Their Concerns About Fair Trade to the Supermarket: The Role of Neutralisation. [REVIEW]Andreas Chatzidakis, Sally Hibbert & Andrew P. Smith - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 74 (1):89 - 100.
    This article explores how neutralisation can explain people's lack of commitment to buying Fair Trade (FT) products, even when they identify FT as an ethical concern. It examines the theoretical tenets of neutralisation theory and critically assesses its applicability to the purchase of FT products. Exploratory research provides illustrative examples of neutralisation techniques being used in the FT consumer context. A conceptual framework and research propositions delineate the role of neutralisation in explaining the attitude-behaviour discrepancies evident in relation to consumers' (...)
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  41.  22
    Can't Kant Cognize His Empirical Self? Or, a Problem for (Almost) Every Interpretation of the Refutation of Idealism.Andrew Chignell - 2017 - In Anil Gomes & Andrew Stephenson (eds.), Kant and the Philosophy of Mind: Perception, Reason, and the Self. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 138-158.
    Kant seems to think of our own mental states or representations as the primary objects of inner sense. But does he think that these states also inhere in something? And, if so, is that something an empirical substance that is also cognized in inner sense? This chapter provides textual and philosophical grounds for thinking that, although Kant may agree with Hume that the self is not ‘given’ in inner sense exactly, he does think of the self as cognized through inner (...)
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  42.  8
    Why People Don’T Take Their Concerns About Fair Trade to the Supermarket: The Role of Neutralisation.Andreas Chatzidakis, Sally Hibbert & Andrew P. Smith - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 74 (1):89-100.
    This article explores how neutralisation can explain people's lack of commitment to buying Fair Trade products, even when they identify FT as an ethical concern. It examines the theoretical tenets of neutralisation theory and critically assesses its applicability to the purchase of FT products. Exploratory research provides illustrative examples of neutralisation techniques being used in the FT consumer context. A conceptual framework and research propositions delineate the role of neutralisation in explaining the attitude-behaviour discrepancies evident in relation to consumers' FT (...)
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  43.  33
    Religious Dietary Practices and Secular Food Ethics; or, How to Hope That Your Food Choices Make a Difference Even When You Reasonably Believe That They Don’T.Andrew Chignell - 2018 - In Mark Budolfson, Anne Barnhill & Tyler Doggett (eds.), Oxford Hanbook of Food Ethics. New York, USA: Oxford University Press.
    Religious dietary practices foster a sense of communal identity, certainly, but traditionally they are also regarded as pleasing to God (or the gods, or the ancestors) and spiritually beneficial. In other words, for many religious people, the effects of fasting go well beyond what is immediately observed or empirically measurable, and that is a large part of what motivates participation in the practice. The goal of this chapter is to develop that religious way of thinking into a response to a (...)
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  44. Free: Why Science Hasn’T Disproved Free Will, by Alfred R. Mele.Andrew Kissel - 2015 - Teaching Philosophy 38 (3):354-358.
  45. 10. Lucius T. Outlaw, Jr., On Race and Philosophy Lucius T. Outlaw, Jr., On Race and Philosophy (Pp. 454-456).Margaret Gilbert, Andrew Mason, Elizabeth S. Anderson, J. David Velleman, Matthew H. Kramer, Michele M. Moody‐Adams & Martha C. Nussbaum - 1999 - Ethics 109 (2).
  46.  45
    Why Stereotypes Don’T Even Make Good Defaults.Andrew C. Connolly, Jerry A. Fodor, Lila R. Gleitman & Henry Gleitman - 2007 - Cognition 103 (1):1-22.
  47.  77
    The Neuroscientific Study of Religious and Spiritual Phenomena: Or Why God Doesn't Use Biostatistics.Andrew B. Newberg & Bruce Y. Lee - 2005 - Zygon 40 (2):469-490.
  48.  98
    Constructing Quarks: A Sociological History of Particle Physics. Andrew Pickering.James T. Cushing - 1985 - Philosophy of Science 52 (4):640-641.
  49.  4
    Being Remembered: It Obviously Doesn’T Matter for What ….Andrew Moore - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (4):1900042.
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  50. The Neuropsychological Basis of Religions, or Why God Won't Go Away.Eugene G. D'Aquili & Andrew B. Newberg - 1998 - Zygon 33 (2):187-201.
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