Results for 'Andy Martin'

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  1. Teaching Philosophy Through a Role-Immersion Game.Kathryn E. Joyce, Andy Lamey & Noel Martin - 2018 - Teaching Philosophy 41 (2):175-98.
    A growing body of research suggests that students achieve learning outcomes at higher rates when instructors use active-learning methods rather than standard modes of instruction. To investigate how one such method might be used to teach philosophy, we observed two classes that employed Reacting to the Past, an educational role-immersion game. We chose to investigate Reacting because role-immersion games are considered a particularly effective active-learning strategy. Professors who have used Reacting to teach history, interdisciplinary humanities, and political theory agree that (...)
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  2.  99
    Getting Ahead: Forward Models and Their Place in Cognitive Architecture.Martin J. Pickering & Andy Clark - 2014 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 18 (9):451-456.
    The use of forward models is well established in cognitive and computational neuroscience. We compare and contrast two recent, but interestingly divergent, accounts of the place of forward models in the human cognitive architecture. On the Auxiliary Forward Model account, forward models are special-purpose prediction mechanisms implemented by additional circuitry distinct from core mechanisms of perception and action. On the Integral Forward Model account, forward models lie at the heart of all forms of perception and action. We compare these neighbouring (...)
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  3.  36
    Swimming and Skiing: Two Modes of Existential Consciousness.Andy Martin - 2010 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 4 (1):42 – 51.
    The philosophical argument between Jean-Paul Sartre and Albert Camus can be summarised in their conflicting accounts of skiing and swimming. For Sartre skiing exemplifies the struggle of existence and the angst of the alienated ego. For Camus, swimming represents some glimmering of collective harmony, the possibility of transcendence. Sartre's thinking is inflected by quantum theory and the 'steady state', whereas Camus is more of a wave theorist, with a lingering nostalgia for the 'primeval atom' and a fondness for peak experiences. (...)
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  4. Justice: A Role-Immersion Game for Teaching Political Philosophy.Noel Martin, Matthew Draper & Andy Lamey - 2020 - Teaching Philosophy 43 (3):281-308.
    We created Justice: The Game, an educational, role-immersion game designed to be used in philosophy courses. We seek to describe Justice in sufficent detail so that it is understandable to readers not already familiar with role-immersion pedagogy. We hope some instructors will be sufficiently interested in using the game. In addition to describing the game we also evaluate it, thereby highlighting the pedagogical potential of role-immersion games designed to teach political philosophy. We analyze the game by drawing on our observations (...)
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  5.  7
    Brain Recording, Mind-Reading, and Neurotechnology: Ethical Issues From Consumer Devices to Brain-Based Speech Decoding.Stephen Rainey, Stéphanie Martin, Andy Christen, Pierre Mégevand & Eric Fourneret - 2020 - Science and Engineering Ethics 26 (4):2295-2311.
    Brain reading technologies are rapidly being developed in a number of neuroscience fields. These technologies can record, process, and decode neural signals. This has been described as ‘mind reading technology’ in some instances, especially in popular media. Should the public at large, be concerned about this kind of technology? Can it really read minds? Concerns about mind-reading might include the thought that, in having one’s mind open to view, the possibility for free deliberation, and for self-conception, are eroded where one (...)
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  6. Kai Vogeley, Martin Kurthen, Peter Falkai, and Wolfgang Maier. Essential Functions of the Human.Elkhonon Goldberg, Kenneth Podell, J. Proust, Karl H. Pribram, Vittorio Gallese, Marianne Hammerl, Andy P. Field, Frederick Travis, R. Keith Wallace & J. Allan Cheyne - 1999 - Consciousness and Cognition 8:270.
     
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  7.  64
    Reviews of Stephen Read, Philosophie der Logik. Eine Einführung, Übersetzt von Martin Suhr. Reinbek Bei Hamburg:Rowohlt Taschenbuch Verlag GmbH, 1997. 312 Pp, 26.90 DM Peter Millican and Andy Clark , Machines and Thought—the Legacy of Alan Turing, I, Introduction by P. Millican. Oxford:Clarendon Press, 1996. 297 Pp. £30.00. ISBN 0-19-823593-3 Roberto Pou and Peter M. Simons Formal Ontology. Dordrecht:Kluwer, 1996. Viii + 293 Pp. DF1 220, $135, £99. ISBN 0792 34104x Jaakko Hintikka, The Principles of Mathematics Revisited. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press, 1996. Xii + 288. No Price Stated. ISBN 0 521 49692 6 Luis Vega Renón, Una Guia de Historia de la Logica. Madrid:Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, 1996. 271 Pp. No Price Stated. ISBN 84 362 3372 7 Barry Smith, Austrian Philosophy. The Legacy of Franz Brentano. Chicago and La Salle, 111.:Open Court, 1994 . Xii + 381 Pp. No Price Stated. ISBN 0 81260 9256 X Hans Hahn, Gesammelte Abhandlungen, 3. Edited by L. Schmetterer. [REVIEW]Helge Rückert, N. Finnemann, Wolfe Mays & I. Grattan-Guinness - 1997 - History and Philosophy of Logic 18 (4):233-243.
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  8.  12
    Why Seemingly More Difficult Test Conditions Produce More Accurate Recognition of Semantic Prototype Words: A Recognition Memory Paradox?Jerwen Jou, Eric E. Escamilla, Andy U. Torres, Alejandro Ortiz, Martin Perez & Richard Zuniga - 2018 - Consciousness and Cognition 63:239-253.
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  9. Louis Althusser, The Humanist Controversy and Other Writings Martin Halliwell and Andy Mousley, Critical Humanisms: Humanist/Anti-Humanist Dialogue.N. Power - forthcoming - Radical Philosophy.
     
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  10.  4
    Nijmegen, The Netherlands July 27–August 2, 2006.Rodney Downey, Ieke Moerdijk, Boban Velickovic, Samson Abramsky, Marat Arslanov, Harvey Friedman, Martin Goldstern, Ehud Hrushovski, Jochen Koenigsmann & Andy Lewis - 2007 - Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 13 (2).
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  11. Moral Responsibility and Subverting Causes.Andy Taylor - 2010 - Dissertation, University of Reading
    I argue against two of the most influential contemporary theories of moral responsibility: those of Harry Frankfurt and John Martin Fischer. Both propose conditions which are supposed to be sufficient for direct moral responsibility for actions. (By the term direct moral responsibility, I mean moral responsibility which is not traced from an earlier action.) Frankfurt proposes a condition of 'identification'; Fischer, writing with Mark Ravizza, proposes conditions for 'guidance control'. I argue, using counterexamples, that neither is sufficient for direct (...)
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  12.  1
    Towards a New Literary Humanism.Andy Mousley (ed.) - 2011 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Machine generated contents note: -- List of Contributors -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction: Towards a New Literary Humanism; A. Mousley -- PART I: LITERATURE_AS ERSATZ_THEOLOGY: DEEP SELVES -- Introduction; A. Mousley -- Faith, Feeling, Reality: Anne Brontë as an Existentialist Poet; R. Styler -- Virginia Woolf, Sympathy and Feeling for the Human; K. Martin -- Being Human and being Animal in Twentieth-Century Horse-Whispering Writings: 'Word-Bound Creatures' and 'the Breath of Horses'; E. Graham_ -- Judith Butler and the Catachretic Human; I. (...)
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  13.  20
    What is 'First Philosophy'? Comments on Richard Velkley's Heidegger, Strauss, and the Premises of Philosophy.Andy German - 2013 - History of European Ideas 39 (6):899-915.
    Summary In a noteworthy new study, Richard Velkley brings together Martin Heidegger and Leo Strauss as part of a reexamination of the foundations and nature of philosophical questioning. In what follows, I critically reflect on this shared search for foundations, and particularly on the role of Plato in Strauss's effort to forge a new path for philosophy which moves away from Heidegger without losing sight of him.
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  14. Review of Andy Clark, Being There: Putting Brain, Body, and World Together Again[REVIEW]Sean D. Kelly - 2000 - Mind 109 (433).
    The title of Andy Clark's book is, among other things, a reference to one of the central terms in Martin Heidegger's early work: "Dasein" (being there) is the word that Heidegger uses to refer to beings like ourselves. Clark is no Heidegger scholar, but the reference is deliberate; among the predecessors to his book he lists not only Heidegger himself, but also the American Heidegger scholar Hubert Dreyfus and the French Heideggerean phenomenologist Maurice Merleau-Ponty. This triumvirate has played (...)
     
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  15. The Boxer and the Goalkeeper: Sartre Vs Camus.Andrew Martin - 2012 - Simon & Schuster.
    Jean-Paul Sartre is the author of possibly the most notorious one-liner of twentieth-century philosophy: 'Hell is other people'. Albert Camus was The Outsider. The two men first came together in Occupied Paris in the middle of the Second World War, and quickly became friends, comrades, and mutual admirers. But the intellectual honeymoon was short-lived. In 1943, with Nazis patrolling the streets, Sartre and Camus sat in a café on the boulevard Saint-Germain with Simone de Beauvoir and began a discussion about (...)
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  16. A Defence of Extended Cognitivism.Martin Godwyn - unknown
    This dissertation defends extended cognitivism: a recently emerging view in the philosophy of mind and cognitive science that claims that an individual's cognitive processes or states sometimes extend beyond the boundaries of their brain or their skin to include states and processes in the world. I begin the defence of this thesis through a background discussion of several foundational issues in cognitive science: the general character of cognitive behaviour and cognitive processes, as well as the nature and role of representation (...)
     
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  17.  69
    Readings in Philosophy and Cognitive Science.Alvin I. Goldman (ed.) - 1993 - Cambridge: MIT Press.
    Table of Contents Contributors Introduction I Epistemology 1 Visual Object Recognition by Irving Biederman 2 Deductive Reasoning by John H. Holland, Keith J. Holyoak, Richard E. Nisbett and Paul R. Thagard 3 Probabilistic Reasoning by Amos Tversky and Daniel Kahneman 4 Our Native Inferential Tendencies by Hilary Kornblith 5 Epistemic Folkways and Scientific Epistemology by Alvin I. Goldman II Science and Mathematics 6 Observation Reconsidered by Jerry A. Fodor 7 Perceptual Plasticity and Theoretical Neutrality: A Reply to Jerry Fodor by (...)
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  18. Basic Writings: Martin Heidegger.Martin Heidegger - 1993 - Routledge.
    First published in 1993. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
     
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  19. Andy Clark Cognitive Complexity and the Sensorimotor Frontier.Andy Clark - 2006 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 80 (1):43–65.
  20. Supersizing the Mind: Embodiment, Action, and Cognitive Extension.Andy Clark (ed.) - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
    In Supersizing the Mind, Andy Clark argues that the human mind is not bound inside the head but extends into body and environment.
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  21. Crisis and Repetition: Essays on Art and Culture.Kate Armstrong - 2002 - Michigan State University Press.
    Kate Armstrong examines the philosophies of the Marquis de Sade, Søren Kierkegaard, Martin Heidegger, and the artwork of Andy Warhol, Michael Heizer, Kasimir Malevich, Ad Reinhardt, and Barnett Newman, arguing that, in reaction to the crisis of modernity, these writers and artists are involved in the process of refiguring the divine. Armstrong views these artists and their strategies in relation to "death of God" theology to demonstrate how, through inverting or shifting the transcendent and the immanent, they are (...)
     
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  22.  1
    Erinnerung an Martin Heidegger.Martin Heidegger - 1977 - Klett-Cotta.
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  23.  15
    Surfing Uncertainty: Prediction, Action, and the Embodied Mind.Andy Clark - 2016 - Oxford University Press USA.
    How is it that thoroughly physical material beings such as ourselves can think, dream, feel, create and understand ideas, theories and concepts? How does mere matter give rise to all these non-material mental states, including consciousness itself? An answer to this central question of our existence is emerging at the busy intersection of neuroscience, psychology, artificial intelligence, and robotics.In this groundbreaking work, philosopher and cognitive scientist Andy Clark explores exciting new theories from these fields that reveal minds like ours (...)
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  24.  48
    Verification (Bewahrung) in Martin Buber.Martin Kavka - 2012 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 20 (1):71-98.
    Abstract The work of Martin Buber oscillates between talk in which transcendence is experienced and talk in which transcendence is merely postulated. In order to show and mend this incoherence in Buber's thought, this essay attends to the rhetoric of verification ( Bewährung ), primarily but not solely in I and Thou (1923), both in order to show how it is a symptom of this incoherence, and also to show a broad pragmatic strain in Buber's thought. Given this pragmatic (...)
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  25. Duty and the Beast: Should We Eat Meat in the Name of Animal Rights?Andy Lamey - 2019 - Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
    The moral status of animals is a subject of controversy both within and beyond academic philosophy, especially regarding the question of whether and when it is ethical to eat meat. A commitment to animal rights and related notions of animal protection is often thought to entail a plant-based diet, but recent philosophical work challenges this view by arguing that, even if animals warrant a high degree of moral standing, we are permitted - or even obliged - to eat meat. (...) Lamey provides critical analysis of past and present dialogues surrounding animal rights, discussing topics including plant agriculture, animal cognition, and in vitro meat. He documents the trend toward a new kind of omnivorism that justifies meat-eating within a framework of animal protection, and evaluates for the first time which forms of this new omnivorism can be ethically justified, providing crucial guidance for philosophers as well as researchers in culture and agriculture. (shrink)
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  26. Disputing About Taste.Andy Egan - 2010 - In Ted Warfield & Richard Feldman (eds.), Disagreement. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. pp. 247-286.
    “There’s no disputing about taste.” That’s got a nice ring to it, but it’s not quite the ring of truth. While there’s definitely something right about the aphorism – there’s a reason why it is, after all, an aphorism, and why its utterance tends to produce so much nodding of heads and muttering of “just so” and “yes, quite” – it’s surprisingly difficult to put one’s finger on just what the truth in the neighborhood is, exactly. One thing that’s pretty (...)
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  27. Being There: Putting Brain, Body, and World Together Again.Andy Clark - 1997 - MIT Press.
    In treating cognition as problem solving, Andy Clark suggests, we may often abstract too far from the very body and world in which our brains evolved to guide...
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  28.  1
    The Letters of Martin Buber a Life of Dialogue.Martin Buber & Richard Winston - 1991 - Schocken.
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  29. How to Knit Your Own Markov Blanket.Andy Clark - 2017 - Philosophy and Predictive Processing.
    Hohwy (Hohwy 2016, Hohwy 2017) argues there is a tension between the free energy principle and leading depictions of mind as embodied, enactive, and extended (so-called ‘EEE1 cognition’). The tension is traced to the importance, in free energy formulations, of a conception of mind and agency that depends upon the presence of a ‘Markov blanket’ demarcating the agent from the surrounding world. In what follows I show that the Markov blanket considerations do not, in fact, lead to the kinds of (...)
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  30.  32
    Martin Antike Rhetorik: Technik und Methode. Munich: C. H. Beck. 1974. Pp. xii + 420. DM 118.S. Usher & J. Martin - 1976 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 96:197-198.
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  31. Epistemic Modals in Context.Andy Egan, John Hawthorne & Brian Weatherson - 2005 - In Gerhard Preyer & Georg Peter (eds.), Contextualism in Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 131-170.
    A very simple contextualist treatment of a sentence containing an epistemic modal, e.g. a might be F, is that it is true iff for all the contextually salient community knows, a is F. It is widely agreed that the simple theory will not work in some cases, but the counterexamples produced so far seem amenable to a more complicated contextualist theory. We argue, however, that no contextualist theory can capture the evaluations speakers naturally make of sentences containing epistemic modals. If (...)
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  32.  25
    Explaining Behaviour: Reasons in a World of Causes.Andy Clark - 1990 - Philosophical Quarterly 40 (158):95-102.
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  33. Epistemic Modals, Relativism and Assertion.Andy Egan - 2007 - Philosophical Studies 133 (1):1--22.
    I think that there are good reasons to adopt a relativist semantics for epistemic modal claims such as ``the treasure might be under the palm tree'', according to which such utterances determine a truth value relative to something finer-grained than just a world (or a <world, time> pair). Anyone who is inclined to relativise truth to more than just worlds and times faces a problem about assertion. It's easy to be puzzled about just what purpose would be served by assertions (...)
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  34.  97
    The Martin Buber Reader: Essential Writings.Martin Buber - 2002 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    There is no adequate understanding of contemporary Jewish and Christian theology without reference to Martin Buber. Buber wrote numerous books during his lifetime (1878-1965) and is best known for I and Thouand Good and Evil. Buber has influenced important Protestant theologians like Karl Barth, Emil Brunner, Paul Tillich, and Reinhold Niebuhr. His appeal is vast--not only is he renowned for his translations of the Hebrew Bible but also for his interpretation of Hasidism, his role in Zionism, and his writings (...)
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  35. Thought in a Hostile World: The Evolution of Human Cognition.Andy Clark - 2005 - Mind 114 (455):777-782.
  36. The Extended Mind.Andy Clark & David J. Chalmers - 1998 - Analysis 58 (1):7-19.
    Where does the mind stop and the rest of the world begin? The question invites two standard replies. Some accept the demarcations of skin and skull, and say that what is outside the body is outside the mind. Others are impressed by arguments suggesting that the meaning of our words "just ain't in the head", and hold that this externalism about meaning carries over into an externalism about mind. We propose to pursue a third position. We advocate a very different (...)
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  37. Epistemic Modality.Andy Egan & Brian Weatherson (eds.) - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    There is a lot that we don't know. That means that there are a lot of possibilities that are, epistemically speaking, open. For instance, we don't know whether it rained in Seattle yesterday. So, for us at least, there is an epistemic possibility where it rained in Seattle yesterday, and one where it did not. What are these epistemic possibilities? They do not match up with metaphysical possibilities - there are various cases where something is epistemically possible but not metaphysically (...)
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  38.  30
    Mind, Brain and the Quantum.Andy Clark - 1990 - Philosophical Quarterly 40 (161):509-514.
  39. There’s Something Funny About Comedy: A Case Study in Faultless Disagreement.Andy Egan - 2014 - Erkenntnis 79 (S1):73-100.
    Very often, different people, with different constitutions and comic sensibilities, will make divergent, conflicting judgments about the comic properties of a given person, object, or event, on account of those differences in their constitutions and comic sensibilities. And in many such cases, while we are inclined to say that their comic judgments are in conflict, we are not inclined to say that anybody is in error. The comic looks like a poster domain for the phenomenon of faultless disagreement. I argue (...)
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  40.  18
    Martin Heidegger, lecteur et critique d'Ernst Jünger.Martine Béland - 2004 - Horizons Philosophiques 14 (2):57-80.
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  41. Visual Experience and Motor Action: Are the Bonds Too Tight?Andy Clark - 2001 - Philosophical Review 110 (4):495-519.
    How should we characterize the functional role of conscious visual experience? In particular, how do the conscious contents of visual experience guide, bear upon, or otherwise inform our ongoing motor activities? According to an intuitive and (I shall argue) philosophically influential conception, the links are often quite direct. The contents of conscious visual experience, according to this conception, are typically active in the control and guidance of our fine-tuned, real-time engagements with the surrounding three-dimensional world. But this idea (which I (...)
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  42. Some Counterexamples to Causal Decision Theory.Andy Egan - 2007 - Philosophical Review 116 (1):93-114.
    Many philosophers (myself included) have been converted to causal decision theory by something like the following line of argument: Evidential decision theory endorses irrational courses of action in a range of examples, and endorses “an irrational policy of managing the news”. These are fatal problems for evidential decision theory. Causal decision theory delivers the right results in the troublesome examples, and does not endorse this kind of irrational news-managing. So we should give up evidential decision theory, and be causal decision (...)
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  43. Whatever Next? Predictive Brains, Situated Agents, and the Future of Cognitive Science.Andy Clark - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (3):181-204.
    Brains, it has recently been argued, are essentially prediction machines. They are bundles of cells that support perception and action by constantly attempting to match incoming sensory inputs with top-down expectations or predictions. This is achieved using a hierarchical generative model that aims to minimize prediction error within a bidirectional cascade of cortical processing. Such accounts offer a unifying model of perception and action, illuminate the functional role of attention, and may neatly capture the special contribution of cortical processing to (...)
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  44.  11
    Martin Ritter: Into the World: The Movement of Patočka’s Phenomenology: Springer, Cham, 2019, 183 Pp, ISBN 978-3-030-23656-4.Martin Koci - 2020 - Continental Philosophy Review 54 (1):107-111.
    The studies of the Czech phenomenologist Jan Patočka has been flourishing recently. Martin Ritter’s book Into the World: The Movement of Patočka’s Phenomenology offers an important contribution to the debate and a long-awaited critical presentation of Patočka’s asubjective phenomenology as well as creative re-reading of Patočka's central doctrine of the movements of existence.
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  45. The Way of Response: Martin Buber.Martin Buber - 1966 - New York: Schocken Books.
    God.--I and thou.--Faith.--Man.--Human speech and dialogue.--Creation, revelation, redemption.--Community and history.--Israel: Jewish existence.--Epilogue: Renewal.--Acknowledgments.
     
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  46. Seeing and Believing: Perception, Belief Formation and the Divided Mind.Andy Egan - 2008 - Philosophical Studies 140 (1):47 - 63.
    On many of the idealized models of human cognition and behavior in use by philosophers, agents are represented as having a single corpus of beliefs which (a) is consistent and deductively closed, and (b) guides all of their (rational, deliberate, intentional) actions all the time. In graded-belief frameworks, agents are represented as having a single, coherent distribution of credences, which guides all of their (rational, deliberate, intentional) actions all of the time. It's clear that actual human beings don't live up (...)
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  47.  21
    Of Masks and Men Martin Hollis.Martin Hollis - 1985 - In Michael Carrithers, Steven Collins & Steven Lukes (eds.), The Category of the Person: Anthropology, Philosophy, History. Cambridge University Press. pp. 217.
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  48.  36
    Being There: Putting Brain, Body, and World Together Again.Andy Clark - 1996 - MIT Press.
    In Being There, Andy Clark weaves these several threads into a pleasing whole and goes on to address foundational questions concerning the new tools and..
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  49. Billboards, Bombs and Shotgun Weddings.Andy Egan - 2009 - Synthese 166 (2):251-279.
    It's a presupposition of a very common way of thinking about contextsensitivity in language that the semantic contribution made by a bit of context-sensitive vocabulary is sensitive only to features of the speaker's situation at the time of utterance. I argue that this is false, and that we need a theory of context-dependence that allows for content to depend not just on the features of the utterance's origin, but also on features of its destination. There are cases in which a (...)
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  50. Appearance Properties?Andy Egan - 2006 - Noûs 40 (3):495-521.
    Intentionalism is the view that the phenomenal character of an experience is wholly determined by its representational content is very attractive. Unfortunately, it is in conflict with some quite robust intuitions about the possibility of phenomenal spectrum inversion without misrepresentation. Faced with such a problem, there are the usual three options: reject intentionalism, discount the intuitions and deny that spectrum inversion without misrepresentation is possible, or find a way to reconcile the two by dissolving the apparent conflict. Sydney Shoemaker's (1994) (...)
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