46 found
Order:
Disambiguations
Angela Ballantyne [43]Angela J. Ballantyne [3]
  1. An Ethics Framework for Big Data in Health and Research.Vicki Xafis, G. Owen Schaefer, Markus K. Labude, Iain Brassington, Angela Ballantyne, Hannah Yeefen Lim, Wendy Lipworth, Tamra Lysaght, Cameron Stewart, Shirley Sun, Graeme T. Laurie & E. Shyong Tai - 2019 - Asian Bioethics Review 11 (3):227-254.
    Ethical decision-making frameworks assist in identifying the issues at stake in a particular setting and thinking through, in a methodical manner, the ethical issues that require consideration as well as the values that need to be considered and promoted. Decisions made about the use, sharing, and re-use of big data are complex and laden with values. This paper sets out an Ethics Framework for Big Data in Health and Research developed by a working group convened by the Science, Health and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  2. Consent and the Ethical Duty to Participate in Health Data Research.Angela Ballantyne & G. Owen Schaefer - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (6):392-396.
    The predominant view is that a study using health data is observational research and should require individual consent unless it can be shown that gaining consent is impractical. But recent arguments have been made that citizens have an ethical obligation to share their health information for research purposes. In our view, this obligation is sufficient ground to expand the circumstances where secondary use research with identifiable health information is permitted without explicit subject consent. As such, for some studies the Institutional (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  3.  88
    Disability Rights as a Necessary Framework for Crisis Standards of Care and the Future of Health Care.Laura Guidry-Grimes, Katie Savin, Joseph A. Stramondo, Joel Michael Reynolds, Marina Tsaplina, Teresa Blankmeyer Burke, Angela Ballantyne, Eva Feder Kittay, Devan Stahl, Jackie Leach Scully, Rosemarie Garland-Thomson, Anita Tarzian, Doron Dorfman & Joseph J. Fins - 2020 - Hastings Center Report 50 (3):28-32.
    In this essay, we suggest practical ways to shift the framing of crisis standards of care toward disability justice. We elaborate on the vision statement provided in the 2010 Institute of Medicine (National Academy of Medicine) “Summary of Guidance for Establishing Crisis Standards of Care for Use in Disaster Situations,” which emphasizes fairness; equitable processes; community and provider engagement, education, and communication; and the rule of law. We argue that interpreting these elements through disability justice entails a commitment to both (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  4.  13
    Adjusting the Focus: A Public Health Ethics Approach to Data Research.Angela Ballantyne - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (3):357-366.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  5.  28
    Big Data and Public-Private Partnerships in Healthcare and Research: The Application of an Ethics Framework for Big Data in Health and Research.Angela Ballantyne & Cameron Stewart - 2019 - Asian Bioethics Review 11 (3):315-326.
    Public-private partnerships are established to specifically harness the potential of Big Data in healthcare and can include partners working across the data chain—producing health data, analysing data, using research results or creating value from data. This domain paper will illustrate the challenges that arise when partners from the public and private sector collaborate to share, analyse and use biomedical Big Data. We discuss three specific challenges for PPPs: working within the social licence, public antipathy to the commercialisation of public sector (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  6.  55
    How to Do Research Fairly in an Unjust World.Angela J. Ballantyne - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (6):26-35.
    International research, sponsored by for-profit companies, is regularly criticised as unethical on the grounds that it exploits research subjects in developing countries. Many commentators agree that exploitation occurs when the benefits of cooperative activity are unfairly distributed between the parties. To determine whether international research is exploitative we therefore need an account of fair distribution. Procedural accounts of fair bargaining have been popular solutions to this problem, but I argue that they are insufficient to protect against exploitation. I argue instead (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  7.  66
    Public Interest in Health Data Research: Laying Out the Conceptual Groundwork.Angela Ballantyne & G. Owen Schaefer - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (9):610-616.
    The future of health research will be characterised by three continuing trends: rising demand for health data; increasing impracticability of obtaining specific consent for secondary research; and decreasing capacity to effectively anonymise data. In this context, governments, clinicians and the research community must demonstrate that they can be responsible stewards of health data. IRBs and RECs sit at heart of this process because in many jurisdictions they have the capacity to grant consent waivers when research is judged to be of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  8.  14
    Revisiting the Equity Debate in COVID-19: ICU is No Panacea.Angela Ballantyne, Wendy A. Rogers, Vikki Entwistle & Cindy Towns - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (10):641-645.
    Throughout March and April 2020, debate raged about how best to allocate limited intensive care unit resources in the face of a growing COVID-19 pandemic. The debate was dominated by utility-based arguments for saving the most lives or life-years. These arguments were tempered by equity-based concerns that triage based solely on prognosis would exacerbate existing health inequities, leaving disadvantaged patients worse off. Central to this debate was the assumption that ICU admission is a valuable but scarce resource in the pandemic (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  9.  74
    Benefits to Research Subjects in International Trials: Do They Reduce Exploitation or Increase Undue Inducement?Angela Ballantyne - 2008 - Developing World Bioethics 8 (3):178-191.
    There is an alleged tension between undue inducement and exploitation in research trials. This paper considers claims that increasing the benefits to research subjects enrolled in international, externally-sponsored clinical trials should be avoided on the grounds that it may result in the undue inducement of research subjects. This article contributes to the debate about exploitation versus undue inducement by introducing an analysis of the available empirical research into research participants' motivations and the influence of payments on research subjects' behaviour and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  10.  91
    ‘Fair Benefits’ Accounts of Exploitation Require a Normative Principle of Fairness: Response to Gbadegesin and Wendler, and Emanuel Et Al.Angela Ballantyne - 2008 - Bioethics 22 (4):239–244.
    In 2004 Emanuel et al. published an influential account of exploitation in international research, which has become known as the 'fair benefits account'. In this paper I argue that the thin definition of fairness presented by Emanuel et al, and subsequently endorsed by Gbadegesin and Wendler, does not provide a notion of fairness that is adequately robust to support a fair benefits account of exploitation. The authors present a procedural notion of fairness – the fair distribution of the benefits of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  11.  10
    Against the Use and Publication of Contemporary Unethical Research: The Case of Chinese Transplant Research.Wendy C. Higgins, Wendy A. Rogers, Angela Ballantyne & Wendy Lipworth - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (10):678-684.
    Recent calls for retraction of a large body of Chinese transplant research and of Dr Jiankui He’s gene editing research has led to renewed interest in the question of publication, retraction and use of unethical biomedical research. In Part 1 of this paper, we briefly review the now well-established consequentialist and deontological arguments for and against the use of unethical research. We argue that, while there are potentially compelling justifications for use under some circumstances, these justifications fail when unethical practices (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  12.  8
    How Should We Think About Clinical Data Ownership?Angela Ballantyne - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (5):289-294.
    The concept of ‘ownership’ is increasingly central to debates, in the media, health policy and bioethics, about the appropriate management of clinical data. I argue that the language of ownership acts as a metaphor and reflects multiple concerns about current data use and the disenfranchisement of citizens and collectives in the existing data ecosystem. But exactly which core interests and concerns ownership claims allude to remains opaque. Too often, we jump straight from ‘ownership’ to ‘private property’ and conclude ‘the data (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  13.  6
    Digital Contact Tracing and Exposure Notification: Ethical Guidance for Trustworthy Pandemic Management.Robert Ranisch, Niels Nijsingh, Angela Ballantyne, Anne van Bergen, Alena Buyx, Orsolya Friedrich, Tereza Hendl, Georg Marckmann, Christian Munthe & Verina Wild - forthcoming - Ethics and Information Technology.
    There is growing interest in contact tracing apps for pandemic management. It is crucial to consider ethical requirements before, while, and after implementing such apps. In this paper, we illustrate the complexity and multiplicity of the ethical considerations by presenting an ethical framework for a responsible design and implementation of CT apps. Using this framework as a starting point, we briefly highlight the interconnection of social and political contexts, available measures of pandemic management, and a multi-layer assessment of CT apps. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  14.  9
    “Who is Watching the Watchdog?”: Ethical Perspectives of Sharing Health-Related Data for Precision Medicine in Singapore.Tamra Lysaght, Angela Ballantyne, Vicki Xafis, Serene Ong, Gerald Owen Schaefer, Jeffrey Min Than Ling, Ainsley J. Newson, Ing Wei Khor & E. Shyong Tai - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-11.
    Background We aimed to examine the ethical concerns Singaporeans have about sharing health-data for precision medicine and identify suggestions for governance strategies. Just as Asian genomes are under-represented in PM, the views of Asian populations about the risks and benefits of data sharing are under-represented in prior attitudinal research. Methods We conducted seven focus groups with 62 participants in Singapore from May to July 2019. They were conducted in three languages and analysed with qualitative content and thematic analysis. Results Four (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  15.  12
    Data and Tissue Research Without Patient Consent: A Qualitative Study of the Views of Research Ethics Committees in New Zealand.Angela Ballantyne & Andrew Moore - 2018 - Ajob Empirical Bioethics 9 (3):143-153.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  16.  40
    Prenatal Diagnosis and Abortion for Congenital Abnormalities: Is It Ethical to Provide One Without the Other?Angela Ballantyne, Ainsley Newson, Florencia Luna & Richard Ashcroft - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (8):48-56.
    This target article considers the ethical implications of providing prenatal diagnosis (PND) and antenatal screening services to detect fetal abnormalities in jurisdictions that prohibit abortion for these conditions. This unusual health policy context is common in the Latin American region. Congenital conditions are often untreated or under-treated in developing countries due to limited health resources, leading many women/couples to prefer termination of affected pregnancies. Three potential harms derive from the provision of PND in the absence of legal and safe abortion (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  17.  23
    Gender and Trust in Medicine: Vulnerabilities, Abuses, and Remedies.Wendy Rogers & Angela Ballantyne - 2008 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 1 (1):48-66.
    Trust is taken to be one of the foundational values in the doctor-patient relationship, facilitating access to the benefits of health care and providing a guarantee against possible harms. Despite this foundational role, some doctors betray the trust of their patients. Trusting involves granting discretionary powers and makes the truster vulnerable to the trustee. Patients trust medical practitioners to act with goodwill and to act competently. Some patients carry pre-existing vulnerabilities, for reasons such as gender, poverty, age, ethnicity, or disability, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  18.  9
    Hiv International Clinical Research: Exploitation and Risk.Angela Ballantyne - 2005 - Bioethics 19 (5-6):476-491.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  19.  26
    Justice in Health Research: What is the Role of Evidence-Based Medicine?Wendy Rogers & Angela Ballantyne - 2009 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 52 (2):188-202.
  20.  45
    Exploitation in Cross-Border Reproductive Care.Angela Ballantyne - 2014 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 7 (2):75-99.
    This paper will focus on a subcategory of cross-border reproductive care—commercial contracts for the sale of reproductive goods and services. In these cases, the women are paid a fee for their reproductive goods and services . Such contracts have generated widespread concern about exploitation. Yet the term exploitation is used variably in the literature and conflated with concerns about harm, commodification, lack of autonomy of sellers, unjust conditions of poverty, and invalid consent. It is also often assumed that exploitation should (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  21.  33
    Patient Participation in Clinical Ethics Support Services – Patient-Centered Care, Justice and Cultural Competence.Angela J. Ballantyne, Elizabeth Dai & Ben Gray - 2017 - Clinical Ethics 12 (1):11-18.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  22. Is Sex-Selective Abortion Morally Justified and Should It Be Prohibited?Wendy Rogers, Angela Ballantyne & Heather Draper - 2007 - Bioethics 21 (9):520–524.
  23.  33
    Wanted—Egg Donors for Research: A Research Ethics Approach to Donor Recruitment and Compensation.Angela Ballantyne & Sheryl de Lacey - 2008 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 1 (2):145-164.
    As the demand for human eggs for stem cell research increases, debate about appropriate standards for recruitment and compensation of women intensifies. In the majority of cases, the source of eggs for research is women undergoing fertility treatment requiring ovarian stimulation and egg retrieval. The principle of "just participant selection" requires that research subjects be selected from the population that stands to benefit from the research. Based on this principle, infertile women should be actively recruited to donate eggs for fertility-related (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  24.  9
    When is Sex-Specific Research Appropriate?Wendy Rogers & Angela Ballantyne - 2008 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 1 (2):36-57.
    Inclusion in research is a question of both scientific validity of research results and just distribution of the benefits of medical research within a community. Therefore, inappropriate exclusions from research can be regulated as a matter of science or a matter of ethics. In this paper we examine the definitions of appropriate/fair inclusion in the Australian and U.S. regulatory systems and discuss the processes for interpreting and implementing these normative standards. In the second part of the paper, we present original (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  25.  34
    Wanted—Egg Donors for Research: A Research Ethics Approach to Donor Recruitment and Compensation.Angela Ballantyne & Sheryl De Lacey - 2008 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 1 (2):145 - 164.
    As the demand for human eggs for stem cell research increases, debate about appropriate standards for recruitment and compensation of women intensifies. In the majority of cases, the source of eggs for research is women undergoing fertility treatment requiring ovarian stimulation and egg retrieval. The principle of "just participant selection" requires that research subjects be selected from the population that stands to benefit from the research. Based on this principle, infertile women should be actively recruited to donate eggs for fertility-related (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  26.  8
    Wanted—Egg Donors for Research: A Research Ethics Approach to Donor Recruitment and Compensation.Angela Ballantyne & Sheryl de Lacey - 2008 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 1 (2):145-164.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  27.  7
    Introduction.Angela Ballantyne, Belinda Bennett, Isabel Karpin & Wendy Rogers - 2008 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 1 (2):1-4.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  28.  20
    Humans and Hybrids: A Critique of the Western Moral Framework.Angela Ballantyne - 2004 - Essays in Philosophy 5 (2):3.
    This paper uses the advent of human-animal hybrids, created though somatic cell nuclear transfer experiments in America and Australia, as a tool to deconstruct and challenge the dualistic belief that humans are morally distinct and superior to animals. The view that moral value corresponds to species membership creates a scientific and cultural environment that prohibits or restricts human embryo experimentation whilst permitting the extensive use of animals for research. The dualistic premise therefore motivates the creation of human-animal hybrids for research (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  29.  1
    In Defence of a Broad Approach to Public Interest in Health Data Research.Angela Ballantyne & G. Owen Schaefer - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2020-106880.
    In their response to ‘Public interest in health data research: laying out the conceptual groundwork’, Grewal and Newson critique us for inattention to the law and putting forward an impracticably broad conceptual understanding of public interest. While we agree more work is needed to generate a workable framework for Institutional Review Boards/Research Ethics Committees, we would contend that this should be grounded on a broad conception of public interest. This broadness facilitates regulatory agility, and is already reflected by some current (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  10
    In Favor of a No-Consent/Opt-Out Model of Research With Clinical Samples.Angela Ballantyne - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (9):65-67.
  31.  12
    Pregnancy and the Culture of Extreme Risk Aversion.Angela Ballantyne, Colin Gavaghan, John McMillan & Sue Pullon - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (2):21-23.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  3
    Pregnant Women Can Finally Expect Better.Angela Ballantyne - 2019 - Hastings Center Report 49 (1):10-11.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33.  22
    Richard E. Ashcroft is Professor of Bioethics in the School of Law at Queen Mary, at the University of London. He has Published Widely on Ethical Issues in Medical Research and in Public Health. His Current Research is on Bioethics and Human Rights and Equality and Difference in Reproductive Rights. [REVIEW]Angela Ballantyne, Belinda Bennett, Véronique Bergeron & Diana Buccafurni - 2008 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 1 (2).
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  14
    Research Ethics Revised: The New CIOMS Guidelines and the World Medical Association Declaration of Helsinki in Context.Angela Ballantyne & Stefan Eriksson - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (3):310-311.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  18
    Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Prenatal Diagnosis and Abortion for Congenital Abnormalities: Is It Ethical to Provide One Without the Other?”.Angela Ballantyne, Ainsley Newson, Florencia Luna & Richard Ashcroft - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (8):6-7.
    This target article considers the ethical implications of providing prenatal diagnosis and antenatal screening services to detect fetal abnormalities in jurisdictions that prohibit abortion for these conditions. This unusual health policy context is common in the Latin American region. Congenital conditions are often untreated or under-treated in developing countries due to limited health resources, leading many women/couples to prefer termination of affected pregnancies. Three potential harms derive from the provision of PND in the absence of legal and safe abortion for (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  40
    Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “How to Do Research Fairly in an Unjust World”.Angela J. Ballantyne - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (6):4-6.
    (2010). Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “How to Do Research Fairly in an Unjust World”. The American Journal of Bioethics: Vol. 10, No. 6, pp. W4-W6.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  11
    The Experiences of Pregnant Women in an Interventional Clinical Trial: Research In Pregnancy Ethics Study.Angela Ballantyne, Susan Pullon, Lindsay Macdonald, Christine Barthow, Kristen Wickens & Julian Crane - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (6):476-483.
    There is increasing global pressure to ensure that pregnant women are responsibly and safely included in clinical research in order to improve the evidence base that underpins healthcare delivery during pregnancy. One supposed barrier to inclusion is the assumption that pregnant women will be reluctant to participate in research. There is however very little empirical research investigating the views of pregnant women. Their perspective on the benefits, burdens and risks of research is a crucial component to ensuring effective recruitment. The (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38.  12
    Taxonomy of Justifications for Consent Waivers: When and Why Are Public Views Relevant?Angela Ballantyne & G. Owen Schaefer - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (5):353-354.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  6
    To What Extent Are Calls for Greater Minority Representation in COVID Vaccine Research Ethically Justified?Angela Ballantyne & Agomoni Ganguli-Mitra - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (2):99-101.
    In this commentary, we take up Yearby’s call for racism-sensitive research and apply this to the discourse regarding race and diversity in COVID vaccine research. We consider whether efforts...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. Under What Conditions is Clinical Research in Developing Countries Exploitative? A Framework for Assessing Exploitation in Mutually Advantageous Transactions.Angela Ballantyne - 2006 - Advances in Bioethics 9:209-244.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Gender Inequalities in Health Research : An Australian Perspective.Belinda Bennett, Isabel Karpin, Angela Ballantyne & Wendy Rogers - 2008 - In Michael D. A. Freeman (ed.), Law and Bioethics / Edited by Michael Freeman. Oxford University Press.
  42.  8
    From Protectionism to Inclusion: A New Zealand Perspective on Health‐Related Research Involving Adults Incapable of Giving Informed Consent.Alison Douglass & Angela Ballantyne - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (3):384-392.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  6
    Donor-Funded Research: Permissible, Not Perfect.Mike King & Angela Ballantyne - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (1):36-40.
    Donor-funded research is research funded by private donors in exchange for research-related benefits, such as trial participation or access to the trial intervention. This has been pejoratively referred to as ‘pay to play’ research, and criticised as unethical. We outline three models of donor-funded research, and argue for their permissibility on the grounds of personal liberty, their capacity to facilitate otherwise unfunded health research and their consistency with current ethical standards for research. We defend this argument against objections that donor-funded (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  2
    Perceptions of ‘Precision’ and ‘Personalised’ Medicine in Singapore and Associated Ethical Issues.Serene Ong, Jeffrey Ling, Angela Ballantyne, Tamra Lysaght & Vicki Xafis - 2021 - Asian Bioethics Review 13 (2):179-194.
    Governments are investing in precision medicine with the aim of improving healthcare through the use of genomic analyses and data analytics to develop tailored treatment approaches for individual patients. The success of PM is contingent upon clear public communications that engender trust and secure the social licence to collect and share large population-wide data sets because specific consent for each data re-use is impractical. Variation in the terminology used by different programmes used to describe PM may hinder clear communication and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  4
    Responding to Unethical Research: The Importance of Transparency.Wendy A. Rogers, Wendy C. Higgins, Angela Ballantyne & Wendy Lipworth - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (10):691-692.
    We thank Goldstein and Peterson, Caplan, and Bramstedt for engaging with our paper on the ethics of publishing and using Chinese transplant research that involves organs procured from executed prisoners.1–4 In that paper, we examine consequentialist and deontological arguments for and against using data from unethical research. Goldstein and Peterson question the relationship between the social and scientific value of the research and the decision to publish the results. They argue that the failure to publish scientifically valid and socially valuable (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. Ethics of Digital Contact Tracing Wearables.G. Owen Schaefer & Angela Ballantyne - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2020-106958.
    The success of digital COVID-19 contact tracing requires a strategy that successfully addresses the digital divide—inequitable access to technology such as smartphones. Lack of access both undermines the degree of social benefit achieved by the use of tracing apps, and exacerbates existing social and health inequities because those who lack access are likely to already be disadvantaged. Recently, Singapore has introduced portable tracing wearables to address the equity gap and promote public health. We argue that governments have an ethical obligation (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark