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  1.  15
    Radiobiology in the Atomic Age: Changing Research Practices and Policies in Comparative Perspective. [REVIEW]Angela N. H. Creager & María Jesús Santesmases - 2006 - Journal of the History of Biology 39 (4):637 - 647.
    This essay introduces a special collection of papers by Angela Creager, Soraya de Chadarevian, Karen Rader, Jean-Paul Gaudillière, and María Jesús Santesmases on the theme "Radiobiology in the Atomic Age.".
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  2. Science Without Laws. Model Systems, Cases, Exemplary Narratives.Angela N. H. Creager, Elizabeth Lunbeck & M. Norton Wise - 2008 - Journal of the History of Biology 41 (1):199-202.
  3.  31
    The Paradox of the Phage Group: Essay Review. [REVIEW]Angela N. H. Creager - 2010 - Journal of the History of Biology 43 (1):183 - 193.
  4.  26
    Nuclear Energy in the Service of Biomedicine: The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission’s Radioisotope Program, 1946–1950. [REVIEW]Angela N. H. Creager - 2006 - Journal of the History of Biology 39 (4):649 - 684.
    The widespread adoption of radioisotopes as tools in biomedical research and therapy became one of the major consequences of the "physicists' war" for postwar life science. Scientists in the Manhattan Project, as part of their efforts to advocate for civilian uses of atomic energy after the war, proposed using infrastructure from the wartime bomb project to develop a government-run radioisotope distribution program. After the Atomic Energy Bill was passed and before the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) was formally established, the Manhattan (...)
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  5.  63
    Adaptation or Selection? Old Issues and New Stakes in the Postwar Debates Over Bacterial Drug Resistance.Angela N. H. Creager - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 38 (1):159-190.
    The 1940s and 1950s were marked by intense debates over the origin of drug resistance in microbes. Bacteriologists had traditionally invoked the notions of ‘training’ and ‘adaptation’ to account for the ability of microbes to acquire new traits. As the field of bacterial genetics emerged, however, its participants rejected ‘Lamarckian’ views of microbial heredity, and offered statistical evidence that drug resistance resulted from the selection of random resistant mutants. Antibiotic resistance became a key issue among those disputing physiological vs. genetic (...)
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  6.  83
    Wendell Stanley's Dream of a Free-Standing Biochemistry Department at the University of California, Berkeley.Angela N. H. Creager - 1996 - Journal of the History of Biology 29 (3):331-360.
    Scientists and historians have often presumed that the divide between biochemistry and molecular biology is fundamentally epistemological.100 The historiography of molecular biology as promulgated by Max Delbrück's phage disciples similarly emphasizes inherent differences between the archaic tradition of biochemistry and the approach of phage geneticists, the ur molecular biologists. A historical analysis of the development of both disciplines at Berkeley mitigates against accepting predestined differences, and underscores the similarities between the postwar development of biochemistry and the emergence of molecular biology (...)
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  7.  44
    Phosphorus-32 in the Phage Group: Radioisotopes as Historical Tracers of Molecular Biology.Angela N. H. Creager - 2009 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 40 (1):29-42.
    The recent historiography of molecular biology features key technologies, instruments and materials, which offer a different view of the field and its turning points than preceding intellectual and institutional histories. Radioisotopes, in this vein, became essential tools in postwar life science research, including molecular biology, and are here analyzed through their use in experiments on bacteriophage. Isotopes were especially well suited for studying the dynamics of chemical transformation over time, through metabolic pathways or life cycles. Scientists labeled phage with phosphorus-32 (...)
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  8.  6
    Nuclear Energy in the Service of Biomedicine: The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission’s Radioisotope Program, 1946–1950.Angela N. H. Creager - 2006 - Journal of the History of Biology 39 (4):649-684.
    The widespread adoption of radioisotopes as tools in biomedical research and therapy became one of the major consequences of the "physicists' war" for postwar life science. Scientists in the Manhattan Project, as part of their efforts to advocate for civilian uses of atomic energy after the war, proposed using infrastructure from the wartime bomb project to develop a government-run radioisotope distribution program. After the Atomic Energy Bill was passed and before the Atomic Energy Commission was formally established, the Manhattan Project (...)
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  9.  11
    Tracing the Politics of Changing Postwar Research Practices: The Export of 'American' Radioisotopes to European Biologists.Angela N. H. Creager - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 33 (3):367-388.
    This paper examines the US Atomic Energy Commission’s radioisotope distribution program, established in 1946, which employed the uranium piles built for the wartime bomb project to produce specific radioisotopes for use in scientific investigation and medical therapy. As soon as the program was announced, requests from researchers began pouring into the Commission’s office. During the first year of the program alone over 1000 radioisotope shipments were sent out. The numerous requests that came from scientists outside the United States, however, sparked (...)
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  10.  7
    Tracing the Politics of Changing Postwar Research Practices: The Export of ‘American’ Radioisotopes to European Biologists.Angela N. H. Creager - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 33 (3):367-388.
  11.  6
    After the Double Helix.Angela N. H. Creager & Gregory J. Morgan - 2008 - Isis 99 (2):239-272.
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  12.  5
    Adaptation or Selection? Old Issues and New Stakes in the Postwar Debates Over Bacterial Drug Resistance.Angela N. H. Creager - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 38 (1):159-190.
  13.  25
    Human Bodies as Chemical Sensors: A History of Biomonitoring for Environmental Health and Regulation.Angela N. H. Creager - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 70:70-81.
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  14.  10
    Phosphorus-32 in the Phage Group: Radioisotopes as Historical Tracers of Molecular Biology.Angela N. H. Creager - 2009 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 40 (1):29-42.
  15.  28
    `What Blood Told Dr Cohn': World War II, Plasma Fractionation, and the Growth of Human Blood Research.Angela N. H. Creager - 1999 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 30 (3):377-405.
  16.  35
    The J. H. B. Bookshelf.Alix Cooper, Elizabeth Hanson, Kathy J. Cooke & Angela N. H. Creager - 1997 - Journal of the History of Biology 30 (1):135-144.
  17.  11
    Douglas M. Surgenor. Edwin J. Cohn and the Development of Protein Chemistry: With a Detailed Account of His Work on the Fractionation of Blood During and After World War II. Xx+434 Pp., Frontis., Illus., Index. Boston: Center for Blood Research, 2002. $34.95, £23.95, €34.95. [REVIEW]Angela N. H. Creager - 2003 - Isis 94 (4):763-765.
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  18.  13
    Historical Fine-Mapping.Angela N. H. Creager - 2008 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 51 (1):144-148.
  19.  10
    Alan H. Goodman;, Deborah Heath;, M. Susan Lindee . Genetic Nature/Culture: Anthropology and Science Beyond the Two‐Culture Divide. Xvii + 311 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2003. $24.95. [REVIEW]Angela N. H. Creager - 2006 - Isis 97 (4):788-790.
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  20.  13
    Elizabeth Blackburn and the Story of Telomeres: Deciphering the Ends of DNA.Angela N. H. Creager - 2010 - Annals of Science 67 (2):265-268.
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  21.  8
    Essay Review: Building Biology Across the Atlantic.Angela N. H. Creager - 2003 - Journal of the History of Biology 36 (3):579-589.
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  22.  7
    Robert Olby. Francis Crick: Hunter of Life's Secrets. Xix + 537 Pp., Illus., Indexes. Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y.: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, 2009. $45. [REVIEW]Angela N. H. Creager - 2011 - Isis 102 (1):202-204.
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  23.  7
    `What Blood Told Dr Cohn': World War II, Plasma Fractionation, and the Growth of Human Blood Research.Angela N. H. Creager - 1999 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 30 (3):377-405.
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  24.  3
    “Happily Ever After” for Cancer Viruses?Angela N. H. Creager - 2014 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 48:260-262.
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  25.  2
    Mike Fortun. Promising Genomics: Iceland and deCODE Genetics in a World of Speculation. Ix + 330 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. Berkeley/Los Angeles: University of California Press, 2008. $24.95. [REVIEW]Angela N. H. Creager - 2009 - Isis 100 (4):944-945.
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  26. Research Materials and Model Organisms in the Biological and Biomedical Sciences-'What Blood Told Dr Cohn': World War II, Plasma Fractionation, and the Growth of Human Blood Research.Angela N. H. Creager - 1999 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 30 (3):377-406.
     
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  27. Research Materials and Model Organisms in the Biological and Biomedical Sciences-Introduction: Research Materials and Model Organisms in the Biological and Biomedical Sciences.Gerald L. Geison & Angela N. H. Creager - 1999 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 30 (3):315-318.
  28. Essay Review-How Constructive is Deconstruction?Manfred D. Laubichler & Angela N. H. Creager - 1999 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 30 (1):129.
     
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