Results for 'Animal rights activists'

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  1.  68
    Ethical Ideology, Animal Rights Activism, and Attitudes Toward the Treatment of Animals.Shelley L. Galvin & Harold A. Herzog Jr - 1992 - Ethics and Behavior 2 (3):141-149.
    In two studies, we used the Ethics Position Questionnaire (EPQ) to investigate the relationship between individual differences in moral philosophy, involvement in the animal rights movement, and attitudes toward the treatment of animals. In the first, 600 animal rights activists attending a national demonstration and 266 nonactivist college students were given the EPQ. Analysis of the returns from 157 activists and 198 students indicated that the activists were more likely than the students to (...)
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  2.  24
    Risk & Reward: The Impact of Animal Rights Activism on Women.Emily Gaarder - 2008 - Society and Animals 16 (1):1-22.
    This qualitative study of 27 women animal activists examines the risks and rewards that accompany a commitment to animal rights activism. One of the common beliefs about animal rights activists is that their political choices are fanatic and unyielding, resulting in rigid self-denial. Contrary to this notion, the women in this study experienced both the pain and the joy of their transformation toward animal activism. Activism took an enormous toll on their personal (...)
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  3. Every Sparrow That Falls: Understanding Animal Rights Activism as Functional Religion.Caspar Wenk, James Parker & Wesley Jamison - 2000 - Society and Animals 8 (3):305-330.
    This article reports original research conducted among animal rights activists and elites in Switzerland and the United States, and the finding that activism functioned in activists' and elites' lives like religious belief. The study used reference sampling to select Swiss and American informants. Various articles and activists have identified both latent and manifest quasi-religious components in the contemporary movement. Hence, the research followed upon these data and anecdotes and tested the role of activism in adherents' (...)
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  4.  20
    The Caring Sleuth: Portrait of an Animal Rights Activist.Kenneth Shapiro - 1994 - Society and Animals 2 (2):145-165.
    The present study of the psychology of animal rights activists utilizes a qualitative analytic method based on two forms of data: a set of questionnaire protocols completed by grassroots activists and of autobiographical accounts by movement leaders. The resultant account keys on the following descriptives: an attitude of caring, suffering as an habitual object of perception, and the aggressive and skillful uncovering and investigation of instances of suffering. In a final section, the investigator discusses tensions and (...)
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  5.  3
    Rights of Animals, Perceptions of Science, and Political Activism: Profile of American Animal Rights Activists.William M. Lunch & Wesley V. Jamison - 1992 - Science, Technology and Human Values 17 (4):438-458.
    This article reports original research examining characteristics of the active followers of the American animal rights movement. Typical respondents were Caucasian, highly educated urban professional women approximately thirty years old with a median income of $33,000. Most activists think of themselves as Democrats or as Independents, and have moderate to liberal political views. They were often suspicious of science and made no distinctions between basic and applied science, or public versus private animal-based research. The research suggests (...)
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  6.  10
    Every Sparrow That Falls: Understanding Animal Rights Activism as Functional Religion.James V. Parker, Wesley V. Jamison & Caspar Wenk - 2000 - Society and Animals 8 (1):305-330.
    This article reports original research conducted among animal rights activists and elites in Switzerland and the United States, and the finding that activism functioned in activists' and elites' lives like religious belief. The study used reference sampling to select Swiss and American informants.Various articles and activists have identified both latent and manifest quasi-religious components in the contemporary movement Hence, the research followed upon these data and anecdotes and tested the role of activism in adherents' lives. (...)
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  7.  26
    In Favor of Tipping the Balance: Animal Rights Activists in Defense of Residential Picketing.Clinton R. Sanders & Justin R. Goodman - 2011 - Society and Animals 19 (2):137-155.
    This discussion focuses on the rationales employed by animal rights activists to explain their involvement in, and support of, protest tactics that are controversial both inside and outside the animal rights movement. The paper centers on the use of residential picketing in a campaign against a private, multinational animal testing firm. Using ethnographic data and semistructured interviews with activists, the discussion demonstrates that these activists are aware of the marginality of their tactics. (...)
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  8.  7
    Defending Animal Rights.Tom Regan - 2001 - University of Illinois Press.
    He puts the issue of animal rights in historical context, drawing parallels between animal rights activism and other social movements, including the anti-slavery movement in the nineteenth century and the gay-lesbian struggle today. He also outlines the challenges to animal rights posed by deep ecology and ecofeminism to using animals for human purposes and addresses the ethical dilemma of the animal rights advocate whose employer uses animals for research."--BOOK JACKET.
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  9.  44
    "I'm Not an Activist!": Animal Rights Vs. Animal Welfare in the Purebred Dog Rescue Movement.Jessica Greenebaum - 2009 - Society and Animals 17 (4):289-304.
    Purebred dog rescuers are doing their part to reduce the problems of homeless pets and pet overpopulation. The volunteers studied are doing the daily and invisible work of saving dogs. Because of their perception of the animal rights movement, however, they do not consider themselves part of the animal welfare or animal rights movement, nor do they care to be. Dog rescue organizations agree with academics and activist organizations on the cause of the problem of (...)
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  10. Animal Rights Extremism and the Terrorism Question.John Hadley - 2009 - Journal of Social Philosophy 40 (3):363-378.
    In this paper I extend orthodox just-war terrorism theory to the phenomenon of extremist violence on behalf of nonhuman animals.I argue that most documented cases of so-called animal rights extremism do not quality as terrorism.
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  11.  7
    Art, Activism, and Animal Rights Scholarship.Heather Schell - 2013 - Society and Animals 21 (3):320-323.
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  12. Animal Rights and Environmental Terrorism.Steve Cooke - 2013 - Journal of Terrorism Research 4 (2):26-36.
    Many paradigmatic forms of animal rights and environmental activism have been classed as terrorism both in popular discourse and in law. This paper argues that the labelling of many violent forms of direct action carried out in the name of animal rights or environmentalism as ‘terrorism’ is incorrect. Furthermore, the claim is also made that even those acts which are correctly termed as terrorism are not necessarily wrongful acts. The result of this analysis is to call (...)
     
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  13.  49
    Framing Animal Rights in the “Go Veg” Campaigns of U.S. Animal Rights Organizations.Carrie Packwood Freeman - 2010 - Society and Animals 18 (2):163-182.
    How much do animal rights activists talk about animal rights when they attempt to persuade America’s meat-lovers to stop eating nonhuman animals? This study serves as the basis for a unique evaluation and categorization of problems and solutions as framed by five major U.S. animal rights organizations in their vegan/food campaigns. The findings reveal that the organizations framed the problems as: cruelty and suffering; commodification; harm to humans and the environment; and needless killing. (...)
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  14. Animal Rights and Environmental Terrorism.Stephen Cooke - 2012 - Journal of Terrorism Research 4 (2):26-36.
    Many paradigmatic forms of animal rights and environmental activism have been classed as terrorism both in popular discourse and in law. This paper argues that the labelling of many violent forms of direct action carried out in the name of animal rights or environmentalism as ‘terrorism’ is incorrect. Furthermore, the claim is also made that even those acts which are correctly termed as terrorism are not necessarily wrongful acts. The result of this analysis is to call (...)
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  15.  19
    An Activist Press: The Farm Press's Coverage of the Animal Rights Movement. [REVIEW]Ann Reisner - 1992 - Agriculture and Human Values 9 (2):38-53.
    The animal rights movement is a serious challenge to current agricultural practices. Agriculture's response, in part, depends on how successfully it can mobilize its natural constituency, farmers. However, theories of the mainstream press suggest that the mainstream press generally covers events, rarely reports or adopts the perspective of alternative movements, rarely includes mobilizing information, and suggests that routine social structures can, should, and will contain the movement. Hence, current theory indicates that the mainstream press does not act to (...)
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  16.  18
    Animal Rights and the Deliberative Turn in Democratic Theory.Robert Garner - 2019 - European Journal of Political Theory 18 (3):309-329.
    Deliberative democracy has been castigated by those who regard it as exclusive and elitist because of its failure to take into account a range of structural inequalities existing within contemporary liberal democracies. As a result, it is suggested, deliberative arenas will merely reproduce these inequalities, advantaging the already powerful extolling mainstream worldviews excluding the interests of the less powerful and those expounding alternative worldviews. Moreover, the tactics employed by those excluded social movements seeking to right an injustice are typically those (...)
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  17.  2
    Animal Rights: History and Scope of a Radical Social Movement.Harold D. Guither - 1998 - Southern Illinois University Press.
    In the past decade, philosopher Bernard Rollin points out, we have "witnessed a major revolution in social concern with animal welfare and the moral status of animals." Adopting the stance of a moderate, Harold Guither attempts to provide an unbiased examination of the paths and goals of the members of the animal rights movement and of its detractors. Given the level of confusion, suspicion, misunderstanding, and mistrust between the two sides, Guither admits the difficulty in locating, much (...)
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  18.  43
    Origin of Adult Animal Rights Lifestyle in Childhood Responsiveness to Animal Suffering.Nicole Pallotta - 2008 - Society and Animals 16 (2):149-170.
    This qualitative study examines the childhood experiences of adult animal rights activists regarding their feelings about, and interactions with, nonhuman animals. Central to children's experiences with animals is the act of eating them, a ritual both normalized and encouraged by the dominant culture and agents of socialization. Yet, despite the massive power of socialization, sometimes children resist the dominant norms of consumption regarding animals. In addition to engaging in acts of resistance, some children, as suggested in the (...)
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  19.  51
    Constitutional Inclusion of Animal Rights in Germany and Switzerland: How Did Animal Protection Become an Issue of National Importance?Erin Evans - 2010 - Society and Animals 18 (3):231-250.
    Provisions for animal rights have been included in the national constitutions of Switzerland and Germany . Protective constitutional inclusion is a major social movement success, and in view of the other movements also seeking increased political visibility and responsiveness, it is worth asking how and why nonhuman animals were allowed into this realm of political importance. This research seeks to explain how animal activists achieved this significant goal in two industrialized democracies. Using an approach drawn from (...)
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  20.  52
    Fast Food and Animal Rights: An Examination and Assessment of the Industry's Response to Social Pressure.Ronald J. Adams - 2008 - Business and Society Review 113 (3):301-328.
    ABSTRACTFast food chains such as McDonald's, KFC, and Burger King are major players in the production, marketing, and consumption of animal‐derived food throughout the world. Animal rights activists are quick to point out the link between the highly efficient factory farms that supply these chains and extreme animal cruelty and environmental degradation. Strategically, fast food is well positioned to leverage change in the methods by which animals are raised and processed for human consumption. Although progress (...)
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  21.  46
    Abolition Then and Now: Tactical Comparisons Between the Human Rights Movement and the Modern Nonhuman Animal Rights Movement in the United States. [REVIEW]Corey Lee Wrenn - 2014 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (2):177-200.
    This article discusses critical comparisons between the human and nonhuman abolitionist movements in the United States. The modern nonhuman abolitionist movement is, in some ways, an extension of the anti-slavery movement of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and the ongoing human Civil Rights movement. As such, there is considerable overlap between the two movements, specifically in the need to simultaneously address property status and oppressive ideology. Despite intentional appropriation of terminology and numerous similarities in mobilization efforts, there has been (...)
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  22. The Philosophy Behind the Movement: Animal Studies Vs. Animal Rights.Elisa Aaltola - 2011 - Society and Animals 19 (4):393-406.
    Recently, many pro- animal thinkers have expressed critical views on the animal rights movement. In particular, the movement has been criticized for being philosophically uninformed, politically regressive, and practically unpersuasive. This paper investigates these criticisms and seeks to map out the philosophy behind the grassroots animal rights movement, specifically. It concludes that the criticism presented by animal studies scholars is often misplaced due to a lack of understanding of the philosophical notions within the movement, (...)
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  23.  7
    Rethinking the American Animal Rights Movement.Emily Patterson-Kane & Michael P. Allen - 2022 - Routledge.
    This book critically reviews all principal contributions to the American animal rights debate by activists, campaigners, academics, and lawyers, while placing animal rights in context with other related and competing movements.
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  24.  22
    Legal Personhood and Animal Rights.Visa Kurki - 2021 - Journal of Animal Ethics 11 (1):47-62.
    A relatively recent form of animal activism is lawsuits intended to declare some animals as legal persons. A pioneer of this approach is the U.S.-based Nonhuman Rights Project. This organization’s primary strategy has been to invoke the writ of habeas corpus, which protects the right to personal freedom of “persons.” The article criticizes the notion of legal personhood that the NhRP is employing and explains how an alternative understanding of legal personhood could perhaps make nonhuman rights more (...)
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  25. People Promoting and People Opposing Animal Rights: In Their Own Words.John M. Kistler - 2002 - Greenwood Press.
    Explores the many issues surrounding the animal rights and animal welfare movements through personal interview responses from rights activists.
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  26.  1
    Gender, Class, and Social Movement Outcomes: Identity and Effectiveness in Two Animal Rights Campaigns.Rachel L. Einwohner - 1999 - Gender and Society 13 (1):56-76.
    Animal rights organizations in the United States are predominantly female and middle class. What are the implications of the composition of these groups for animal rights activists' abilities to achieve their goals? In this article, the author examines the role of class and gender in the outcomes of an anti-hunting campaign and an anti-circus campaign waged by one animal rights organization in the Seattle area. The article shows that hunters make classed and gendered (...)
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  27.  30
    Unlikely Allies Against Factory Farms: Animal Rights Advocates and Environmentalists. [REVIEW]David M. Holt - 2008 - Agriculture and Human Values 25 (2):169-171.
    I examine the risks and opportunities associated with social movement coalition building in attempts to block or curtail the rise of Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) in the United States. As producers have scaled up animal production facilities, environmentalists and animal rights activists, along with numerous other social actors, have begun anti-CAFO campaigns. I argue that while the CAFO has mobilized a diverse group of social actors, these individuals and organizations do not all have the (...)
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  28.  15
    Religiosity and Public Reason: The Case of Direct Action Animal Rights Advocacy.J. Hadley - 2017 - Res Publica 23 (3):299-312.
    Recent social science research indicates that animal rights philosophy plays the functional role of a religion in the lives of the most committed animal rights advocates. In this paper, I apply the functional religion thesis to the recent debate over the place of direct action animal rights advocacy in democratic theory. I outline the usefulness of the functional religion thesis and explain its implications for theorists that call for deliberative theories to be more inclusive (...)
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  29.  7
    The Peta Practical Guide to Animal Rights: Simple Acts of Kindness to Help Animals in Trouble.Ingrid Newkirk - 2009 - St. Martin's Griffin.
    With more than two million members and supporters, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) is the world’s largest animal-rights organization, and its founder and president, Ingrid Newkirk, is one of the most well-known and most effective activists in America. She has spearheaded worldwide efforts to improve the treatment of animals in manufacturing, entertainment, and elsewhere. Every day, in laboratories, food factories, and other industries, animals by the millions are subjected to inhumane cruelty. In this accessible (...)
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  30.  61
    Attitudes and Dispositional Optimism of Animal Rights Demonstrators.Harold A. Herzog & Shelley L. Galvin - 1998 - Society and Animals 6 (1):1-11.
    Mail-in surveys were distributed to animal activists attending the 1996 March for the Animals. Age and genderdemographic characteristics of the 209 activists who participated in the study were similar to those of the 1990 March for the Animals demonstrators. Most goals of the animal rights movement were judged to be moderately to critically important, although beliefs about their chances of being realized varied considerably. Movement tactics judged to be least effective included the liberation of laboratory (...)
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  31.  12
    Beyond Morality: Developing a New Rhetorical Strategy for the Animal Rights Movement.Maxim Fetissenko - 2011 - Journal of Animal Ethics 1 (2):150-175.
    This article offers a critique of the central role afforded to the rights/sentience-based moral argument in the rhetorical strategy of the animal rights movement since the 1970s. Though important for articulating the movement’s philosophy and recruiting new activists, this argument has limited persuasive appeal, as suggested by the common failure of liberation movements to achieve their goals through moral advocacy. A two-prong approach addressing human health and environmental effects of animal agriculture is offered both as (...)
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  32.  15
    An Analysis of Diversity in Nonhuman Animal Rights Media.Corey Lee Wrenn - 2016 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 29 (2):143-165.
    Lack of diversity in the ranks as well as a failure to resonate with disadvantaged groups and other anti-oppression movements has been cited as one important barrier to the American Nonhuman Animal rights movement’s success. It is possible that social movements are actively inhibiting diversity in the ranks and audience by producing literature that reflects a narrow activist identity. This article creates a platform from which these larger issues can be explored by investigating the actual demographic representations present (...)
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  33.  18
    Rawls and the Distribution of Human Resources By Those in the Animal Rights Community.Alan C. Clune - 2014 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (2):251-266.
    Until now, arguments for the distribution of resources by those who care about the plight of human-used animals have been either utilitarian or libertarian in nature. The utilitarian case has been made in writing by both activists and philosophers. The libertarian case is more a position that I have found comes naturally to many in the animal movement. In this article I make use of elements of Rawls’ A Theory of Justice to make a case for two principles (...)
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  34.  55
    The Animal Is Present: The Ethics of Animal Use in Contemporary Art.Anthony Cross - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 76 (4):519-528.
    In recent years, an increasing number of contemporary artists have incorporated live animals into their work. Although this development has attracted a great deal of attention in the artworld and among animal rights activists, it has not been much discussed in the philosophy of art—which is quite remarkable, given the serious ethical and artistic questions that these artworks prompt. I focus on answering two such questions. First, is the use of animals in these artworks ethically objectionable? Or (...)
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  35.  7
    On Some Difficulties of Putting in Dialogue Animal Rights with Anthropological Debates: A Historical View in Three Episodes.Alessandro Mancuso - 2018 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 31 (3):677-705.
    In this paper, I try to identify the reasons why the dialogue between sociocultural anthropology and animal rights theories and movements continues to be difficult and scarce. At first sight this weakness of communication is surprising, if one looks at the amount of anthropological studies on human/animal relationships, in most cases pointing to how animals are considered in many cultures as non-human subjects or persons. For understanding the roots of this state of affairs, I compare the ways (...)
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  36.  56
    Legal Personhood: Animals, Artificial Intelligence and the Unborn.Visa A. J. Kurki & Tomasz Pietrzykowski (eds.) - 2017 - Springer.
    This edited work collates novel contributions on contemporary topics that are related to human rights. The essays address analytic-descriptive questions, such as what legal personality actually means, and normative questions, such as who or what should be recognised as a legal person. As is well-known among jurists, the law has a special conception of personhood: corporations are persons, whereas slaves have traditionally been considered property rather than persons. This odd state of affairs has not garnered the interest of legal (...)
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  37. Activism for Animals.D. Rudacille - 1998 - In Marc Bekoff & Carron A. Meaney (eds.), Encyclopedia of Animal Rights and Animal Welfare. Greenwood Press. pp. 1--3.
     
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  38.  7
    Animals and War: Confronting the Military-Animal Industrial Complex.Anthony J. Nocella, Colin Salter & Judy K. C. Bentley (eds.) - 2013 - Lexington Books.
    Animals and War: Confronting the Military-Animal Industrial Complex is the first book to examine how nonhuman animals are used in war and the military. Animals and War contributes significantly to the fields of social justice, animal rights, and anti-war/peace activist communities. This book also will be read by peace, conflict, social justice, and critical animal studies scholars, students, and practitioners.
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  39. Animal Experimentation and the Argument From Limited Resources.Charles K. Fink - 1991 - Between the Species 7 (2):90-95.
    Animal rights activists are often accused of caring more about animals than about human beings. How, it is asked, can activists condemn the use of animals in biomedical research—research that improves human health and saves human lives? In this article, I argue that even if animal experimentation might eventually provide cures for many serious diseases, given the present state of the world, we are not justified supporting this research; rather, we ought to devote our limited (...)
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  40.  12
    Animal Ethics: A Contemporary Introduction.Bob Fischer - 2021 - New York: Routledge.
    There are many introductions to the animal ethics literature. There aren't many introductions to the practice of doing animal ethics. Bob Fischer's Animal Ethics: A Contemporary Introduction fills that gap, offering an accessible model of how animal ethics can be done today. The book takes up classic issues, such as the ethics of eating meat and experimenting on animals, but tackles them in an empirically informed and nuanced way. It also covers a range of relatively neglected (...)
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  41.  9
    The Animal Ethics Reader.Susan J. Armstrong & Richard G. Botzler (eds.) - 2008 - Routledge.
    The Animal Ethics Reader is an acclaimed anthology containing both classic and contemporary readings, making it ideal for anyone coming to the subject for the first time. It provides a thorough introduction to the central topics, controversies and ethical dilemmas surrounding the treatment of animals, covering a wide range of contemporary issues, such as animal activism, genetic engineering, and environmental ethics. The extracts are arranged thematically under the following clear headings: Theories of Animal Ethics Nonhuman Animal (...)
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  42.  3
    Loving Animals: Toward a New Animal Advocacy.Kathy Rudy - 2013 - Univ of Minnesota Press.
    The contemporary animal rights movement encompasses a wide range of sometimes-competing agendas from vegetarianism to animal liberation. For people for whom pets are family members—animal lovers outside the fray—extremist positions in which all human–animal interaction is suspect often discourage involvement in the movement to end cruelty to other beings. In _Loving Animals_, Kathy Rudy argues that in order to achieve such goals as ending animal testing and factory farming, activists need to be better (...)
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  43.  1
    Animals and War: Confronting the Military-Animal Industrial Complex.Anthony J. Nocella, Colin Salter & Judy K. C. Bentley (eds.) - 2013 - Lexington Books.
    Animals and War: Confronting the Military-Animal Industrial Complex is the first book to examine how nonhuman animals are used in war and the military. Animals and War contributes significantly to the fields of social justice, animal rights, and anti-war/peace activist communities. This book also will be read by peace, conflict, social justice, and critical animal studies scholars, students, and practitioners.
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  44.  6
    Don't Put All Your Speech-Acts in One Basket: Situating Animal Activism in the Deliberative System.Lucy J. Parry - 2017 - Environmental Values 26 (4):437-455.
    In this article I offer the deliberative systems approach as a normative and evaluative approach through which to appraise typically 'non-deliberative' animal activism. Although such actions can contribute to inclusive deliberation through the political representation of animals, I caution against an over-reliance on such tactics, and interrogate the claim that non-deliberative tactics are essential ingredients for prompting the reflection and reconsideration that animal rights philosophy demands. Instead, non-deliberative activism may serve not only to undermine further deliberation but (...)
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  45.  49
    Loving Animals: Toward a New Animal Advocacy.Kathy Rudy - 2011 - Univ of Minnesota Press.
    Machine generated contents note: ContentsIntroduction: A Change of Heart1. What's behind Animal Advocacy? -- 2. The Love of a Dog: Of Pets and Puppy Mills, Mixed-Breeds and Shelters -- 3. The Animal on Your Plate: Farmers, Vegans, and Locavores -- 4. Where the Wild Things Ought to Be: Sanctuaries, Zoos, and Exotic Pets -- 5. From Object to Subject: Animals in Scientific Research -- 6. Clothing Ourselves in Stories of Love: Affect and Animal AdvocacyConclusion: Trouble in the (...)
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  46. In Defense of Animals.Peter Singer (ed.) - 2013 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    Bringing together new essays by philosophers and activists, _In Defense of Animals: The Second Wave_ highlights the new challenges facing the animal rights movement. Exciting new collection edited by controversial philosopher Peter Singer, who made animal rights into an international concern when he first published _In Defence of Animals_ and _Animal Liberation_ over thirty years ago Essays explore new ways of measuring animal suffering, reassess the question of personhood, and draw highlight tales of effective (...)
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  47.  14
    Africa and Her Animals: Philosophical and Practical Perspectives.Rainer Ebert & Anteneh Roba (eds.) - 2018 - Pretoria, South Africa: University of South Africa Press.
    Africa and Her Animals challenges the common view that animals are essentially inferior to human beings: it is both the start of a long overdue conversation and a call to action. Non‐human animals, essential to the everyday lives and well-being of Africans, impact and are affected by African societies in diverse ways. Africa and Her Animals investigates and analyses the moral, social, cultural, religious, and legal status of non‐human animals in Africa. The contributors, drawn from a wide range of countries (...)
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  48.  2
    Animal Century: A Celebration of Changing Attitudes to Animals.Mark Gold - 1998 - J. Carpenter.
    Animal Century records some of the most important events and influences behind this often overlooked element of our social history, paying tribute to the courage and endurance that has helped to create a groundswell of public sympathy for our fellow creatures in many countries of the world. Mark Gold's moving and thought-provoking account includes in-depth previously unpublished interviews with many key players - including Maneka Gandhi, Jane Goodall, Celia Hammond, Virginia McKenna and Peter Singer - and celebrates the compassion (...)
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  49.  57
    Activism as Integrity. [REVIEW]Joel Marks - 2008 - Philosophy Now (67):44-45.
    Review of Lee Hall's book, Capers in the Churchyard: Animal Rights Advocacy in the Age of Terror. Ostensibly about tactics in the animal rights movement, the book is in fact a manifesto for thinking about nonhuman animals in a wholly different way from what we have become accustomed to. The review focuses on the welfare/rights debate in the animal movement.
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  50. Intervention or Protest: Acting for Nonhuman Animals.Gabriel Garmendia da Trindade & Andrew Woodhall (eds.) - 2016 - Wilmington, Delaware, USA: Vernon Press.
    Within current political, social, and ethical debates – both in academia and society – activism and how individuals should approach issues facing nonhuman animals, have become increasingly important, ‘hot’ issues. Individuals, groups, advocacy agencies, and governments have all espoused competing ideas for how we should approach nonhuman use and exploitation. Ought we proceed through liberation? Abolition? Segregation? Integration? As nonhuman liberation, welfare, and rights’ groups increasingly interconnect and identify with other ‘social justice movements’, resolutions to these questions have become (...)
     
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