Results for 'Animal rights movement'

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  1.  72
    A Rat is a Pig is a Dog is a Boy: The Human Cost of the Animal Rights Movement.Wesley J. Smith - 2009 - Encounter Books.
    Smith believe that granting "rights" to animals would inevitably diminish human dignity.
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  2.  17
    An Activist Press: The Farm Press's Coverage of the Animal Rights Movement[REVIEW]Ann Reisner - 1992 - Agriculture and Human Values 9 (2):38-53.
    The animal rights movement is a serious challenge to current agricultural practices. Agriculture's response, in part, depends on how successfully it can mobilize its natural constituency, farmers. However, theories of the mainstream press suggest that the mainstream press generally covers events, rarely reports or adopts the perspective of alternative movements, rarely includes mobilizing information, and suggests that routine social structures can, should, and will contain the movement. Hence, current theory indicates that the mainstream press does not (...)
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  3.  60
    Animal Rights as a Post-Citizenship Movement.Caryn Ginsberg & Brian Lowe - 2002 - Society and Animals 10 (2):203-215.
    Post-citizenship movements include persons who are well integrated into the economic and educational structures of their society, advocate goals that offer little or no benefit to movement members, and pursue cultural changes in addition to more traditional social movement goals. This survey of 105 attendees at the Animal Rights 2000 conference, described by organizers as the largest event of its kind, supported viewing the animal rights movement as a post-citizenship movement. While confirming (...)
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  4.  44
    Abolition Then and Now: Tactical Comparisons Between the Human Rights Movement and the Modern Nonhuman Animal Rights Movement in the United States. [REVIEW]Corey Lee Wrenn - 2014 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (2):177-200.
    This article discusses critical comparisons between the human and nonhuman abolitionist movements in the United States. The modern nonhuman abolitionist movement is, in some ways, an extension of the anti-slavery movement of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and the ongoing human Civil Rights movement. As such, there is considerable overlap between the two movements, specifically in the need to simultaneously address property status and oppressive ideology. Despite intentional appropriation of terminology and numerous similarities in mobilization efforts, (...)
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  5.  5
    With New Eyes: The Animal Rights Movement and Religion.James Parker - 1993 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 36 (3):338.
  6. The Case for Animal Rights.Tom Regan - 2009 - In Steven M. Cahn (ed.), Noûs. Oxford University Press. pp. 425-434.
    More than twenty years after its original publication, The Case for Animal Rights is an acknowledged classic of moral philosophy, and its author is recognized as the intellectual leader of the animal rights movement. In a new and fully considered preface, Regan responds to his critics and defends the book's revolutionary position.
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  7. Fifteen Years After ?Animal Liberation?: Has the Animal Rights Movement Achieved Philosophical Legitimacy? [REVIEW]John Tuohey & Terence P. Ma - 1992 - Journal of Medical Humanities 13 (2):79-89.
    Fifteen years ago, Peter Singer published Animal Liberation: A New Ethics for Our Treatment of Animals. In it, he proposed to end “the tyranny of humans over nonhuman animals” by “thinking through, carefully, and consistently, the question of how we ought to treat animals” (p. ix). On this anniversary of the book's publication, a critical analysis shows that the logic he presents, though popularly appealing, is philosophically flawed. Though influential in slowing and in some cases stopping biomedical research involving (...)
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  8.  6
    Atheism in the American Animal Rights Movement: An Invisible Majority.Corey Lee Wrenn - 2019 - Environmental Values 28 (6):715-739.
    Previous research has alluded to the predominance of atheism in participant pools of the Nonhuman Animal rights movement, as well as the correlation between atheism and support for anti-speciesism, but no study to date has independently examined this demographic. This article presents a profile of 210 atheists and agnostics, derived from a larger survey of 287 American vegans conducted in early 2017. Results demonstrate that atheists constitute one of the movement's largest demographics, and that atheist and (...)
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  9. Ethics Into Action: Henry Spira and the Animal Rights Movement.Peter Singer - 1999 - Philosophy 74 (290):616-618.
     
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  10.  12
    Beyond Morality: Developing a New Rhetorical Strategy for the Animal Rights Movement. Fetissenko - 2011 - Journal of Animal Ethics 1 (2):150.
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  11. Women and the Animal Rights Movement.[author unknown] - 2011
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  12. Sociology of the Animal Rights Movement.H. A. Herzog - 1998 - In Marc Bekoff & Carron A. Meaney (eds.), Encyclopedia of Animal Rights and Animal Welfare. Greenwood Press. pp. 53--4.
     
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  13. The Case for Animal Rights.Tom Regan - 1983 - University of California Press, C1983.
    More than twenty years after its original publication, _The Case for Animal Rights _is an acknowledged classic of moral philosophy, and its author is recognized as the intellectual leader of the animal rights movement. In a new and fully considered preface, Regan responds to his critics and defends the book's revolutionary position.
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  14. The Animal Rights Debate: Abolition or Regulation?Gary L. Francione & Robert Garner - 2010 - Columbia University Press.
    Gary L. Francione is a law professor and leading philosopher of animal rights theory. Robert Garner is a political theorist specializing in the philosophy and politics of animal protection. Francione maintains that we have no moral justification for using nonhumans and argues that because animals are property—or economic commodities—laws or industry practices requiring "humane" treatment will, as a general matter, fail to provide any meaningful level of protection. Garner favors a version of animal rights that (...)
     
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  15.  34
    "I'm Not an Activist!": Animal Rights Vs. Animal Welfare in the Purebred Dog Rescue Movement.Jessica Greenebaum - 2009 - Society and Animals 17 (4):289-304.
    Purebred dog rescuers are doing their part to reduce the problems of homeless pets and pet overpopulation. The volunteers studied are doing the daily and invisible work of saving dogs. Because of their perception of the animal rights movement, however, they do not consider themselves part of the animal welfare or animal rights movement, nor do they care to be. Dog rescue organizations agree with academics and activist organizations on the cause of the (...)
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  16.  79
    Animal Rights: What Everyone Needs to Know.Paul Waldau - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    General information -- The animals themselves -- Philosophical arguments -- Laws -- Political realities -- Social realities -- Education and the arts -- Contemporary sciences -- Major figures and organizations in the animal rights movement -- The future of animal rights.
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  17. Animal Rights: History and Scope of a Radical Social Movement.Harold D. Guither - 1998 - Southern Illinois University Press.
    In the past decade, philosopher Bernard Rollin points out, we have "witnessed a major revolution in social concern with animal welfare and the moral status of animals." Adopting the stance of a moderate, Harold Guither attempts to provide an unbiased examination of the paths and goals of the members of the animal rights movement and of its detractors. Given the level of confusion, suspicion, misunderstanding, and mistrust between the two sides, Guither admits the difficulty in locating, (...)
     
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  18. Book Review: Women and the Animal Rights Movement[REVIEW]Mary Jean Cravens - 2012 - Gender and Society 26 (5):809-811.
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  19.  28
    Peter Singer, Ethics Into Action: Henry Spira and the Animal Rights Movement:Ethics Into Action: Henry Spira and the Animal Rights Movement.Harlan B. Miller - 2000 - Ethics 110 (2):441-443.
  20.  30
    Ethics Into Action: Henry Spira and the Animal Rights Movement[REVIEW]T. L. S. Sprigge - 1999 - Philosophy 74 (4):606-618.
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  21.  4
    Review of Wesley J. Smith's A Rat is a Pig is a Dog is a Boy: The Human Cost of the Animal Rights Movement[REVIEW]Angus Taylor - 2010 - Between the Species 13 (10):14.
  22.  81
    Animal Rights and Souls in the Eighteenth Century.Aaron Garrett, Richard Dean, Humphrey Primatt, John Oswald & Thomas Young (eds.) - 1713 - Thoemmes Press.
    The publication of 'Animal Rights and Souls in the 18th Century' will be welcomed by everyone interested in the development of the modern animal liberation movement, as well as by those who simply want to savour the work of enlightenment thinkers pushing back the boundaries of both science and ethics. At last these long out-of-print texts are again available to be read and enjoyed - and what texts they are! Gems like Bougeant's witty reductio of the (...)
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  23. I'm Too Sexy for Your Movement : An Analysis of the Failure of the Animal Rights Movement to Promote Vegetarianism.Laura K. Hahn - 2010 - In Greg Goodale & Jason Edward Black (eds.), Arguments About Animal Ethics. Lexington Books.
  24.  2
    Defining Personhood (Under Consideration: Gary L. Francione's Animals, Property, and the Law and Rain Without Thunder: The Ideology of the Animal Rights Movement).Drucilla Cornell - 1997 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 23 (3):109-114.
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  25. Review Essay : Defining Personhood: Gary L. Francione, Animals, Property, and the Law (Philadelphia, Pa: Temple University Press, 1995) and Gary L. Francione, Rain Without Thunder: The Ideology of the Animal Rights Movement (Philadelphia, Pa: Temple University Press, 1996.Drucilla Cornell - 1997 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 23 (3):109-114.
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  26.  3
    Cross-Cultural Examination of the Animal Rights Movement.Jessica Greenebaum - 2018 - Society and Animals 26 (3):335-338.
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  27.  28
    Book Review Of: W. Smith, A Rat is a Pig is a Dog is a Boy: The Human Cost of the Animal Rights Movement[REVIEW]Gary James Jason - 2010 - Liberty (September):47-48.
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  28.  15
    Political Animals: A Study of the Emerging Animal Rights Movement in the United States.David Macauley - 1988 - Between the Species 4 (2):9.
  29.  28
    Peter Singer, Ethics Into Action: Henry Spira and the Animal Rights Movement.Reviewed by Harlan B. Miller - 2000 - Ethics 110 (2).
  30.  14
    A Rat Is a Pig Is a Dog Is a Boy: The Human Cost of the Animal Rights Movement by Wesley J. Smith.Kevin Murphy - 2011 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 11 (4):817-819.
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  31. The Philosophy Behind the Movement: Animal Studies Vs. Animal Rights.Elisa Aaltola - 2011 - Society and Animals 19 (4):393-406.
    Recently, many pro- animal thinkers have expressed critical views on the animal rights movement. In particular, the movement has been criticized for being philosophically uninformed, politically regressive, and practically unpersuasive. This paper investigates these criticisms and seeks to map out the philosophy behind the grassroots animal rights movement, specifically. It concludes that the criticism presented by animal studies scholars is often misplaced due to a lack of understanding of the philosophical notions (...)
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  32.  66
    Ethical Ideology, Animal Rights Activism, and Attitudes Toward the Treatment of Animals.Shelley L. Galvin & Harold A. Herzog Jr - 1992 - Ethics and Behavior 2 (3):141-149.
    In two studies, we used the Ethics Position Questionnaire (EPQ) to investigate the relationship between individual differences in moral philosophy, involvement in the animal rights movement, and attitudes toward the treatment of animals. In the first, 600 animal rights activists attending a national demonstration and 266 nonactivist college students were given the EPQ. Analysis of the returns from 157 activists and 198 students indicated that the activists were more likely than the students to hold an (...)
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  33. Animal Liberation or Animal Rights?Peter Singer - 1987 - The Monist 70 (1):3-14.
    In replying to my review of The Case for Animal Rights in The New York Review of Books, Tom Regan notes that whereas I use the term ‘the animal liberation movement’ to refer to the many people and organizations around the world advocating a complete change in the moral status of animals, he prefers the label ‘animal rights movement’. There is, he says, ‘more than a verbal difference here’. For immediate practical purposes the (...)
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  34.  5
    Nonhuman Animal Rights, Alternative Food Systems, and the Non-Profit Industrial Complex.Corey Lee Wrenn - 2013 - PhaenEx 8 (2):209.
    Alternative food systems have arisen to address societal concerns with the treatment of Nonhuman Animals in food production. This paper presents an abolitionist Nonhuman Animal rights approach and critiques these alternative systems as problematic in regards to goals of considering the rights or welfare of Nonhuman Animals. It is proposed that the trend in social movement professionalization within the structure of a non-profit industrial complex will ultimately favor compromises like “humane” products over more radical abolitionist solutions (...)
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  35.  41
    Origin of Adult Animal Rights Lifestyle in Childhood Responsiveness to Animal Suffering.Nicole Pallotta - 2008 - Society and Animals 16 (2):149-170.
    This qualitative study examines the childhood experiences of adult animal rights activists regarding their feelings about, and interactions with, nonhuman animals. Central to children's experiences with animals is the act of eating them, a ritual both normalized and encouraged by the dominant culture and agents of socialization. Yet, despite the massive power of socialization, sometimes children resist the dominant norms of consumption regarding animals. In addition to engaging in acts of resistance, some children, as suggested in the biographical (...)
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  36.  50
    Constitutional Inclusion of Animal Rights in Germany and Switzerland: How Did Animal Protection Become an Issue of National Importance?Erin Evans - 2010 - Society and Animals 18 (3):231-250.
    Provisions for animal rights have been included in the national constitutions of Switzerland and Germany . Protective constitutional inclusion is a major social movement success, and in view of the other movements also seeking increased political visibility and responsiveness, it is worth asking how and why nonhuman animals were allowed into this realm of political importance. This research seeks to explain how animal activists achieved this significant goal in two industrialized democracies. Using an approach drawn from (...)
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  37.  36
    Animal Rights and Liberation Movements.David Lamb - 1982 - Environmental Ethics 4 (3):215-233.
    l examine Singer’s analogy between human liberation movements and animal liberation movements. Two lines of criticism of animal liberation are rejected: (1) that animal-liberation is not as serious as human liberation since humans have interests which override those of animals; (2) that the concept of animal liberation blurs distinctions between what is appropriate for humans and what is appropriate foranimals. As an alternative I otfer a distinction between reform movements and liberation movements, arguing that while Singer (...)
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  38.  47
    Conflicting Ideologies: Views of Animal Rights Advocates and Their Opponents.Elizabeth Atwood Lawrence - 1994 - Society and Animals 2 (2):175-190.
    In order to understand the animal rights movement as it exists today in American society, it is necessary to explore the ways in which the beliefs of those who support the movement differ from the beliefs of their adversaries. Societal views generally determine the perceived differences and similarities between people and animals, and the issues surrounding these differences are fundamental to the animal rights controversy.
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  39.  86
    A Defense of Animal Rights.Aysel Dog˘an - 2011 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (5):473-491.
    I argue that animals have rights in the sense of having valid claims, which might turn out to be actual rights as society advances and new scientific-technological developments facilitate finding alternative ways of satisfying our vital interests without using animals. Animals have a right to life, to liberty in the sense of freedom of movement and communication, to subsistence, to relief from suffering, and to security against attacks on their physical existence. Animals’ interest in living, freedom, subsistence, (...)
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  40.  23
    Resonance of Moral Shocks in Abolitionist Animal Rights Advocacy: Overcoming Contextual Constraints.Corey Lee Wrenn - 2013 - Society and Animals 21 (4):379-394.
    Jasper and Poulsen have long argued that moral shocks are critical for recruitment in the nonhuman animal rights movement. Building on this, Decoux argues that the abolitionist faction of the nonhuman animal rights movement fails to recruit members because it does not effectively utilize descriptions of suffering. However, the effectiveness of moral shocks and subsequent emotional reactions has been questioned. This article reviews the literature surrounding the use of moral shocks in social movements. Based (...)
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  41.  16
    Gender, Views of Nature, and Support for Animal Rights.Corwin R. Kruse - 1999 - Society and Animals 7 (3):179-198.
    The last 20 years have witnessed the dramatic growth of the animal rights movement and a concurrent increase in its social scientific scrutiny. One of the most notable and consistent findings to emerge from this body of research has been the central role of women in the movement. This paper uses General Social Survey data to examine the influence of views of the relationship of humanity to nature on this gender difference. Holding a Romantic view of (...)
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  42. Animal Liberation: The Definitive Classic of the Animal Movement.Peter Singer - 2009 - Ecco Book/Harper Perennial.
    Since its original publication in 1975, this groundbreaking work has awakened millions of people to the existence of "speciesism"—our systematic disregard of nonhuman animals—inspiring a worldwide movement to transform our attitudes to animals and eliminate the cruelty we inflict on them. In Animal Liberation, author Peter Singer exposes the chilling realities of today’s "factory farms" and product-testing procedures—destroying the spurious justifications behind them, and offering alternatives to what has become a profound environmental and social as well as moral (...)
     
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  43. Gender, Class, and Social Movement Outcomes: Identity and Effectiveness in Two Animal Rights Campaigns.Rachel L. Einwohner - 1999 - Gender and Society 13 (1):56-76.
    Animal rights organizations in the United States are predominantly female and middle class. What are the implications of the composition of these groups for animal rights activists' abilities to achieve their goals? In this article, the author examines the role of class and gender in the outcomes of an anti-hunting campaign and an anti-circus campaign waged by one animal rights organization in the Seattle area. The article shows that hunters make classed and gendered attributions (...)
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  44. Every Sparrow That Falls: Understanding Animal Rights Activism as Functional Religion.Caspar Wenk, James Parker & Wesley Jamison - 2000 - Society and Animals 8 (3):305-330.
    This article reports original research conducted among animal rights activists and elites in Switzerland and the United States, and the finding that activism functioned in activists' and elites' lives like religious belief. The study used reference sampling to select Swiss and American informants. Various articles and activists have identified both latent and manifest quasi-religious components in the contemporary movement. Hence, the research followed upon these data and anecdotes and tested the role of activism in adherents' lives. Using (...)
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  45.  19
    The Caring Sleuth: Portrait of an Animal Rights Activist.Kenneth Shapiro - 1994 - Society and Animals 2 (2):145-165.
    The present study of the psychology of animal rights activists utilizes a qualitative analytic method based on two forms of data: a set of questionnaire protocols completed by grassroots activists and of autobiographical accounts by movement leaders. The resultant account keys on the following descriptives: an attitude of caring, suffering as an habitual object of perception, and the aggressive and skillful uncovering and investigation of instances of suffering. In a final section, the investigator discusses tensions and conflicts (...)
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  46.  61
    Attitudes and Dispositional Optimism of Animal Rights Demonstrators.Harold A. Herzog & Shelley L. Galvin - 1998 - Society and Animals 6 (1):1-11.
    Mail-in surveys were distributed to animal activists attending the 1996 March for the Animals. Age and genderdemographic characteristics of the 209 activists who participated in the study were similar to those of the 1990 March for the Animals demonstrators. Most goals of the animal rights movement were judged to be moderately to critically important, although beliefs about their chances of being realized varied considerably. Movement tactics judged to be least effective included the liberation of laboratory (...)
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  47.  10
    Animal Rights and Liberation Movements.David Lamb - 1982 - Environmental Ethics 4 (3):215-233.
    l examine Singer’s analogy between human liberation movements and animal liberation movements. Two lines of criticism of animal liberation are rejected: that animal-liberation is not as serious as human liberation since humans have interests which override those of animals; that the concept of animal liberation blurs distinctions between what is appropriate for humans and what is appropriate foranimals. As an alternative I otfer a distinction between reform movements and liberation movements, arguing that while Singer meets the (...)
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  48.  5
    Total Liberation: The Power and Promise of Animal Rights and the Radical Earth Movement.Natalie Blanton - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (2):231-233.
  49.  17
    In Favor of Tipping the Balance: Animal Rights Activists in Defense of Residential Picketing.Clinton R. Sanders & Justin R. Goodman - 2011 - Society and Animals 19 (2):137-155.
    This discussion focuses on the rationales employed by animal rights activists to explain their involvement in, and support of, protest tactics that are controversial both inside and outside the animal rights movement. The paper centers on the use of residential picketing in a campaign against a private, multinational animal testing firm. Using ethnographic data and semistructured interviews with activists, the discussion demonstrates that these activists are aware of the marginality of their tactics. Despite some (...)
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  50.  8
    Every Sparrow That Falls: Understanding Animal Rights Activism as Functional Religion.James V. Parker, Wesley V. Jamison & Caspar Wenk - 2000 - Society and Animals 8 (1):305-330.
    This article reports original research conducted among animal rights activists and elites in Switzerland and the United States, and the finding that activism functioned in activists' and elites' lives like religious belief. The study used reference sampling to select Swiss and American informants.Various articles and activists have identified both latent and manifest quasi-religious components in the contemporary movement Hence, the research followed upon these data and anecdotes and tested the role of activism in adherents' lives. Using extensive (...)
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