11 found
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Ann B. Hamric [10]Ann Baile Hamric [2]
  1.  57
    Enhancing Understanding of Moral Distress: The Measure of Moral Distress for Health Care Professionals.Elizabeth G. Epstein, Phyllis B. Whitehead, Chuleeporn Prompahakul, Leroy R. Thacker & Ann B. Hamric - 2019 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 10 (2):113-124.
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  2. Moral Distress, Moral Residue, and the Crescendo Effect.Elizabeth Gingell Epstein & Ann Baile Hamric - 2009 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 20 (4):330-342.
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  3.  24
    A Health System-wide Moral Distress Consultation Service: Development and Evaluation.Ann B. Hamric & Elizabeth G. Epstein - 2017 - HEC Forum 29 (2):127-143.
    Although moral distress is now a well-recognized phenomenon among all of the healthcare professions, few evidence-based strategies have been published to address it. In morally distressing situations, the “presenting problem” may be a particular patient situation, but most often signals a deeper unit- or system-centered issue. This article describes one institution’s ongoing effort to address moral distress in its providers. We discuss the development and evaluation of the Moral Distress Consultation Service, an interprofessional, unit/system-oriented approach to addressing and ameliorating moral (...)
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  4.  91
    Moral Distress: A Growing Problem in the Health Professions?Connie M. Ulrich, Ann B. Hamric & Christine Grady - 2010 - Hastings Center Report 40 (1):20-22.
  5.  24
    Must We Be Courageous?Ann B. Hamric, John D. Arras & Margaret E. Mohrmann - 2015 - Hastings Center Report 45 (3):33-40.
    The notion of virtue in general, and courage in particular, has had a hard time integrating itself into the everyday lexicon of bioethics. Following the lead of enlightenment moral philosophy, which concentrates on the theory of right action as opposed to the ancient Greeks' emphasis on the development of good character, bioethics, with some notable exceptions, has tended to relegate consideration of the virtues to the sidelines of moral argument. Recently, however, there have been calls for the necessity of “moral (...)
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  6.  36
    Institutional Ethics Resources: Creating Moral Spaces.Ann B. Hamric & Lucia D. Wocial - 2016 - Hastings Center Report 46 (S1):22-27.
    Since 1992, institutions accredited by The Joint Commission have been required to have a process in place that allows staff members, patients, and families to address ethical issues or issues prone to conflict. While the commission's expectations clearly have made ethics committees more common, simply having a committee in no way demonstrates its effectiveness in terms of the availability of the service to key constituents, the quality of the processes used, or the outcomes achieved. Beyond meeting baseline accreditation standards, effective (...)
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  7.  29
    Is Broader Better?Elizabeth G. Epstein, Ashley R. Hurst, Dea Mahanes, Mary Faith Marshall & Ann B. Hamric - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (12):15-17.
    In their article “A Broader Understanding of Moral Distress,” Campbell, Ulrich, and Grady (2016) correctly assert that moral distress is well established in the nursing literature and is gaining at...
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  8.  38
    The Courage to Stand Up: The Cultural Politics of Nurses’ Access to Ethics Consultation.Elisa J. Gordon & Ann B. Hamric - 2006 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 17 (3):231-254.
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  9.  65
    Empirical Research on Moral Distress: Issues, Challenges, and Opportunities. [REVIEW]Ann B. Hamric - 2012 - HEC Forum 24 (1):39-49.
    Abstract Studying a concept as complex as moral distress is an ongoing challenge for those engaged in empirical ethics research. Qualitative studies of nurses have illuminated the experience of moral distress and widened the contours of the concept, particularly in the area of root causes. This work has led to the current understanding that moral distress can arise from clinical situations, factors internal to the individual professional, and factors present in unit cultures, the institution, and the larger health care environment. (...)
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  10.  22
    Case Commentary.Ann B. Hamric - 2000 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 9 (1):131-133.
    Ethics raises questions about what kind of society we ought to be, questions that are at the heart of this case. Increasingly, inequalities in healthcare fueled by lack of access, inadequate insurance coverage, and rising costs are creating dilemmas in the proper distribution of healthcare resources. Questions of distributing scarce and valuable resources are fundamentally questions of justice. The classic definition of justice is the duty to give to each person what they deserve and can legitimately claim so that justice (...)
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  11.  4
    Self-Inflicted Moral Distress: Opportunity for a Fuller Exercise of Professionalism.Elizabeth Epstein, Ann B. Hamric & Jeffrey T. Berger - 2019 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 30 (4):314-317.
    Moral distress is a phenomenon increasingly recognized in healthcare that occurs when a clinician is unable to act in a manner consistent with his or her moral requirements due to external constraints. We contend that some experiences of moral distress are self-inflicted due to one’s under-assertion of professional authority, and these are potentially avoidable. In this article we outline causes of self-inflicted moral distress and offer recommendations for mitigation.
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