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Anna Brinkerhoff
Concordia University
  1. Why Epistemic Partiality is Overrated.Nomy Arpaly & Anna Brinkerhoff - 2018 - Philosophical Topics 46 (1):37-51.
    Epistemic partialism is the view that friends have a doxastic duty to overestimate each other. If one holds that there are no practical reasons for belief, we will argue, one has to deny the existence of any epistemic duties, and thus reject epistemic partialism. But if it is false that one has a doxastic duty to overestimate one’s friends, why does it so often seem true? We argue that there is a robust causal relationship between friendship and overestimation that can (...)
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    The Promising Puzzle.Anna Brinkerhoff - 2021 - Philosophers' Imprint 21 (22).
    Here’s a plausible thought: we should make a promise only if we rationally believe that we will follow through. But if that’s right, and if it’s rational to believe only what our evidence supports, then it seems that we shouldn’t make promises to do things our evidence suggests that there’s a significant chance we don’t do – things that many others, or we ourselves, have set out and failed to do. Think: promises to stay faithful or to be on time (...)
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  3.  19
    The Cognitive Demands of Friendship.Anna Brinkerhoff - forthcoming - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly.
    What does friendship require of us cognitively? Recently, some philosophers have argued that friendship places demands on what we believe. Specifically, they argue, friendship demands that we have positive beliefs about our friends even when such beliefs go against the evidence. Call this the doxastic account of the cognitive demands of friendship. Defenders of the doxastic account are committed to making a surprising claim about epistemology: sometimes, our beliefs should be sensitive to things that don’t bear on their truth. I (...)
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    Prejudiced Beliefs Based on the Evidence: Responding to a Challenge for Evidentialism.Anna Brinkerhoff - 2021 - Synthese 199 (5-6):14317-14331.
    According to evidentialism, what is epistemically rational to believe is determined by evidence alone. So, assuming that prejudiced beliefs are irrational, evidentialism entails that they must not be properly based on the evidence. Recently, philosophers have been interested in cases of beliefs that seem to undermine evidentialism: these are beliefs that seem both prejudiced and properly based on the evidence. In these cases, a believer has strong statistical evidence that most members of a social group have some property and then (...)
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    Death, Deprivation and the Afterlife.Anna Brinkerhoff - 2022 - Philosophia 50 (1):19-34.
    Most people believe that death is bad for the one who dies. Much attention has been paid to the Epicurean puzzle about death that the rests on a tension between that belief and another—that death is the end of one’s existence. But there is nearby puzzle about death that philosophers have largely left untouched. This puzzle rests on a tension between the belief that death is bad for the one who dies and the belief that that death is not the (...)
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  6. The Epistemology of Disagreement: New Essays By David Christensen and Jennifer Lackey.Tomas Bogardus & Anna Brinkerhoff - 2015 - Analysis 75 (2):339-342.
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    Resolving the Paradox of Fiction.Anna Brinkerhoff - 2014 - Stance 7:41-50.
    In this paper, I examine the Paradox of Fiction: in order for us to have genuine and rational emotional responses to a character or situation, we must believe that the character or situation is not purely fictional, we believe that fictional characters and situations are purely fictional, and we have genuine and rational emotional responses to fictional characters and situations. After defending and against formidable objections and considering the plausibility of ~ in isolation of and, I conclude that we should (...)
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