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Profile: Anna Mudde (University of Regina)
  1.  46
    “Before You Formed in the Womb I Knew You”: Sex Selection and Spaces of Ambiguity.Anna Mudde - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (3):553-576.
    The spaces provided by biotechnologies of sex selection are rich with epistemological, ontological, and ethical considerations that speak to broadly held social values and epistemic frameworks. In much of the discourse about sex sehction that is not medically indicated, the figure of the "naturally" conceived (future) child is treated as a problem f or parents who want to select the sex of their child. As unknown, that child is ambiguous in terms of sex — "it" is both and neither, and (...)
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  2.  59
    Risky Subjectivity: Antigone, Action, and Universal Trespass.Anna Mudde - 2009 - Human Studies 32 (2):183-200.
    In this paper, I draw on the mutually implicated structures of tragedy and self-formation found in Hegel’s use of Sophocles’ Antigone in the Phenomenology. By emphasizing the apparent distinction between particular and universal in Hegel’s reading of the tragedies in Antigone, I propose that a tragedy of action (which particularizes a universal) is inescapable for subjectivity understood as socially constituted and always already socially engaged. I consider universal/particular relations in three communities: Hegel’s Greek polis, his community of conscience, and my (...)
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  3.  30
    Speaking of Freedom: Philosophy, Politics, and the Struggle for Liberation, by Diane Enns.Anna Mudde - 2009 - Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 13 (2):220-224.
  4.  55
    Karen Barad's Agential Realism and Reflexive Epistemic Authority.Anna Mudde - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 25:65-75.
    Feminist and post-colonial epistemologists, philosophers of science, and thinkers more generally may find themselves in a distinct form of difficult situation regarding their access to and authority over knowledge within the academic world. Because feminist and post-colonial approaches to knowledge require an acute awareness of relations of domination and the ways in which these pervade the social and epistemic world, it is often difficult to know how to proceed in making theory. These theorists are in particularly ripe positions to benefit (...)
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  5.  44
    Philosophy of Science After Feminism, by Janet A. Kourany. [REVIEW]Anna Mudde - 2012 - Philosophy in Review 32 (4):294-296.
  6.  36
    Implicit Understanding and Social Ontologies.Anna Mudde - 2013 - PhaenEx 8 (1):259-266.
    This paper is part of a book symposium on Alexis Shotwell's Knowing Otherwise: Race, Gender, and Implicit Understanding (Penn State Press, 2011).
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  7.  43
    Finn Fordham, I Do, I Undo, I Redo: The Textual Genesis of Modernist Selves in Hopkins, Yeats, Conrad, Forster, Joyce, and Woolf. [REVIEW]Anna Mudde - 2011 - Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 15 (2):234-236.
  8. Beauvoir's Metaphysical Novel: Literature, Philosophy, and Ambiguity.Anna Mudde - 2013 - In Ann Ward (ed.), Socrates and Dionysus: Philosophy and Art in Dialogue. Cambridge Scholars Press.
    In this essay, I explore the ways that Beauvoir’s description of philosophical novels reveals her understanding of consciousness as a particular sort of ambiguity: that which not only gives the world meaning, but which also, necessarily, finds meaning in the world through the values, ideas, and objects given to it by others. It is through the philosophical (metaphysical) novel that Beauvoir finds a medium for the philosophical communication of ambiguity – that is, a medium for writing human being. More specifically, (...)
     
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  9.  14
    Self‐Images and “Perspicuous Representations”: Reflection, Philosophy, and the Glass Mirror.Anna Mudde - 2015 - Metaphilosophy 46 (4-5):539-554.
    Reflection names the central activity of Western philosophical practice; the mirror and its attendant metaphors of reflection are omnipresent in the self-image of Western philosophy and in metaphilosophical reflection on reflection. But the physical experiences of being reflected by glass mirrors have been inadequately theorized contributors to those metaphors, and this has implications not only for the self-image and the self of philosophy but also for metaphilosophical practice. This article begins to rethink the metaphor of reflection anew. Paying attention to (...)
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  10.  6
    Introduction to The Challenge of Epistemic Responsibility: Essays in Honour of Lorraine Code.Anna Mudde - 2016 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 2 (2).
    This paper introduces The Challenge of Epistemic Responsibility: Essays in Honour of Lorraine Code. In this symposium of papers, invited by Feminist Philosophy Quarterly, the authors return to Code’s first book, Epistemic Responsibility, to re-read it, respond to it, and rethink Code’s articulation of epistemic responsibility anew, considering it in light of her other work and drawing it into contact with their own. This symposium is the outcome of a conference panel that Anna Mudde co-organized with Susan Dieleman, held October (...)
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  11.  9
    I Do, I Undo, I Redo.Anna Mudde - 2011 - Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 15 (2):234-236.
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  12.  11
    Embodied Disagreements.Anna Mudde - 2014 - PhaenEx 9 (2):99-111.
    In this paper, I suggest that embodied metaphysical experience underlies many of our everyday judgements, which are expressed in our bodily comportments and actions, through which disagreements in our ontological experiences are highlighted. I propose attending to such concrete, situated disagreements as a way of challenging the tradition of metaphysics as an enterprise of objective and universal theory, and as a way of promoting feminist, anti-racist, and queer practices of responsibility.
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  13.  4
    Karen L.F. Houle, Responsibility, Complexity, and Abortion: Toward a New Image of Ethical Thought. Reviewed By.Anna Mudde - 2016 - Philosophy in Review 36 (3):115-117.
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  14.  5
    Simone de Beauvoir, Political Writings. [REVIEW]Anna Mudde - 2013 - Philosophy in Review 33 (5):346-348.
  15.  5
    Simone de Beauvoir and the Politics of Ambiguity, by Sonia Kruks. [REVIEW]Anna Mudde - 2014 - Philosophy in Review 34 (6):319-321.
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  16. I Do, I Undo, I Redo: The Textual Genesis of Modernist Selves in Hopkins, Yeats, Conrad, Forster, Joyce, and Woolf. [REVIEW]Anna Mudde - 2011 - Symposium 15 (2):234-236.
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  17. Speaking of Freedom: Philosophy, Politics, and the Struggle for Liberation. [REVIEW]Anna Mudde - 2009 - Symposium 13 (2):220-224.
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  18. Thoughtful Theory and the Possibility of Reflexive Subjectivity.Anna Mudde - 2010 - Dissertation, York University
    In this dissertation, I develop a post-reflexive philosophical account of self-knowing subjectivity. I argue that ambiguity, not clarity, is the hallmark of intersubjective being and knowing, and that ambiguous being is particularly evident precisely where subjectivity occupies a central place: in theory. To illustrate this claim, I turn to the ubiquitous and indispensable technology of the glassy mirror, a material object and discursive trope which I use to enliven the Beauvoirean concept of situation: a lived ambiguity of being both subject (...)
     
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