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  1.  49
    Evolutionary biology and the concept of disease.Anne Gammelgaard - 2000 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 3 (2):109-116.
    In recent years, an increasing number of medical books and papers attempting to analyse the concepts of health and disease from the perspective of evolutionary biology have been published.This paper introduces the evolutionary approach to health and disease in an attempt to illuminate the premisses and the framework of Darwinian medicine. My primary aim is to analyse to what extent evolutionary theory provides for a biological definition of the concept of disease. This analysis reveals some important differences between functional explanations (...)
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  2.  13
    Seven-year-old children's perceptions of participating in a comprehensive clinical birth cohort study.Anne Gammelgaard & Hans Bisgaard - 2009 - Clinical Ethics 4 (2):79-84.
    While several studies have explored parents' perceptions of their children's participation in research, very few studies have described the children's own perceptions of their participation in research. The aim of this study was to describe children's perceptions of their participation in a comprehensive longitudinal clinical study. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 17 children aged seven participating in the Copenhagen Prospective Study on Asthma in Childhood. The interviews were audiotaped, transcribed and analysed using the template analysis method. The children rated (...)
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  3.  29
    Informed consent in acute myocardial infarction research.Anne Gammelgaard - 2004 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (4):417 – 434.
    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is a common disease in the Western world and has been the topic of much research. Conducting clinical trials with patients in the acute phase of a myocardial infarction, however, poses an ethical challenge. As patients are often under extreme stress and require urgent medical attention, the process of informed consent is severely constrained. Furthermore, the very procedure of informed consent, which is supposed to protect eligible patients, may be a cause of harm in itself due (...)
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