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  1.  26
    Emotional facial expressions differentially influence predictions and performance for face recognition.Jason S. Nomi, Matthew G. Rhodes & Anne M. Cleary - 2013 - Cognition and Emotion 27 (1):141-149.
  2.  29
    The role of autonomic arousal in feelings of familiarity.Alison L. Morris, Anne M. Cleary & Mary L. Still - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (4):1378-1385.
    Subjective feelings of familiarity associated with a stimulus tend to be strongest when specific information about the previous encounter with the stimulus is difficult to retrieve . Recognizing: The judgment of previous occurrence. Psychological Review, 87, 252–271.]). When a stimulus has been encountered previously and the circumstances of the encounter cannot be recollected, additional cognitive resources may be directed toward recollection processes; this resource allocation is accompanied by autonomic arousal [Dawson, M. E., Filion, D. L., & Schell, A. M. . (...)
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  3.  12
    Increased pupil dilation during tip-of-the-tongue states.Anthony J. Ryals, Megan E. Kelly & Anne M. Cleary - 2021 - Consciousness and Cognition 92 (C):103152.
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  4.  65
    Familiarity from the configuration of objects in 3-dimensional space and its relation to déjà vu: A virtual reality investigation.Anne M. Cleary, Alan S. Brown, Benjamin D. Sawyer, Jason S. Nomi, Adaeze C. Ajoku & Anthony J. Ryals - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (2):969-975.
    Déjà vu is the striking sense that the present situation feels familiar, alongside the realization that it has to be new. According to the Gestalt familiarity hypothesis, déjà vu results when the configuration of elements within a scene maps onto a configuration previously seen, but the previous scene fails to come to mind. We examined this using virtual reality technology. When a new immersive VR scene resembled a previously-viewed scene in its configuration but people failed to recall the previously-viewed scene, (...)
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  5.  37
    What Flips Attention?Anne M. Cleary, Zachary C. Irving & Caitlin Mills - 2023 - Cognitive Science 47 (4):e13274.
    A central feature of our waking mental experience is that our attention naturally toggles back and forth between “external” and “internal” stimuli. In the midst of an externally demanding task, attention can involuntarily shift internally with no clear reason how or why thoughts momentarily shifted inward. In the case of external attention, we are typically exploring and encoding aspects of our external world, whereas internal attention often involves searching for and retrieving potentially relevant information from our memory networks. Cognitive science (...)
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  6.  7
    A possible shared underlying mechanism among involuntary autobiographical memory and déjà vu.Anne M. Cleary, Cati Poulos & Caitlin Mills - 2023 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 46:e361.
    We propose that IAM and déjà vu may not share a placement on the same gradient, per se, but the mechanism of cue familiarity detection, and a major differentiating factor between the two metacognitive experiences is whether the resulting inward directed search of memory yields retrieved content or not. Déjà vu may manifest when contentless familiarity detection is inexplicable by the experiencer.
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