Results for 'Anne-Cathrine Naess'

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  1.  56
    Patient Autonomy in Emergency Medicine.Anne-Cathrine Naess, Reidun Foerde & Petter Andreas Steen - 2001 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (1):71-77.
    Theoretical models for patient-physician communication in clinical practice are frequently described in the literature. Respecting patient autonomy is an ethical problem the physician faces in a medical emergency situation. No theoretical physician-patient model seems to be ideal for solving the communication problem in clinical practice. Theoretical models can at best give guidance to behavior and judgement in emergency situations. In this article the premises of autonomous treatment decisions are discussed. Based on a case-report we discuss different genuine efforts the physician (...)
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  2. Earthcare: An Anthology in Environmental Ethics.Spencer Abraham, Ray Anderson, Nik Ansell, St Thomas Aquinas, St Francis of Assisi, William Baxter, Philip J. Bentley, Joachim Blatter, Murray Bookchin, Maya Brennan, Majora Carter, Carl Cohen, Deane Curtin, Herman Daly, David DeGrazia, Bill Devall, Calvin DeWitt, David Ehrenfeld, Paul, Anne Ehrlich, Robert Elliot, Stuart Ewen, Nuria Fernandez, Stephen Gardiner, Ramachandra Guha, Garrett Hardin, Eugene Hargrove, John Hasse, Po-Keung Ip, Ralf Isenmann, Kauser Jahan, Marianne B. Karsh, Andrew Kernohan, Marti Kheel, Kenneth Kraft, Aldo Leopold, Miriam MacGillis, Juan Martinez-Alier, Ed McGaa, Katie McShane, Roberto Mechoso, Arne Naess, Seyyed Hossein Nasr, Michael Nelson, Bryan Norton, Philip Nyhus, John O'Neil, Stephen Pacala, Ernest Partridge, Erv Peterson, Tom Regan, Holmes Rolston Iii, Lily-Marlene Russow, Mark Sagoff, Kristin Schrader-Frechette, Erroll Schweizer, George Sessions, Vandana Shiva, Peter Singer, Stephen Socolow, Paul Steidlmeier, Richard Sylvan, Bron Taylor & Paul Taylor - 2009 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Earthcare: Readings and Cases in Environmental Ethics presents a diverse collection of writings from a variety of authors on environmental ethics, environmental science, and the environmental movement overall. Exploring a broad range of world views, religions and philosophies, David W. Clowney and Patricia Mosto bring together insightful thoughts on the ethical issues arising in various areas of environmental concern.
     
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  3. Nuclear Weapons and the Future of Humanity: The Fundamental Questions.John P. Holdren, Paul R. Ehrlich, Anne Ehrlich, Gary Stahl, Berel Lang, Richard H. Popkin, Joseph Margolis, Patrick Morgan, John Hare, Russell Hardin, Richard A. Watson, Gregory S. Kavka, Jean Bethke Elshtain, Sidney Axinn, Terry Nardin, Douglas P. Lackey, Jefferson McMahan, Edmund Pellegrino, Stephen Toulmin, Dietrich Fischer, Edward F. McClennen, Louis Rene Beres, Arne Naess, Richard Falk & Milton Fisk - 1986 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    The excellent quality and depth of the various essays make [the book] an invaluable resource....It is likely to become essential reading in its field.—CHOICE.
     
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  4. Philosophical Dialogues: Arne Naess and the Progress of Philosophy.Peder Anker, Per Ariansen, Alfred J. Ayer, Murray Bookchin, Baird Callicott, John Clark, Bill Devall, Fons Elders, Paul Feyerabend, Warwick Fox, William C. French, Harold Glasser, Ramachandra Guha, Patsy Hallen, Stephan Harding, Andrew Mclaughlin, Ivar Mysterud, Arne Naess, Bryan Norton, Val Plumwood, Peter Reed, Kirkpatrick Sale, Ariel Salleh, Karen Warren, Richard A. Watson, Jon Wetlesen & Michael E. Zimmerman - 1999 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    The volume documents, and makes an original contribution to, an astonishing period in twentieth-century philosophy—the progress of Arne Naess's ecophilosophy from its inception to the present. It includes Naess's most crucial polemics with leading thinkers, drawn from sources as diverse as scholarly articles, correspondence, TV interviews and unpublished exchanges. The book testifies to the skeptical and self-correcting aspects of Naess's vision, which has deepened and broadened to include third world and feminist perspectives. Philosophical Dialogues is an essential (...)
     
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  5.  17
    Scepticism.Arne Naess - 1969 - New York: Humanities P..
    Originally published in 1968. Scepticism is generally regarded as a position which, if correct, would be disastrous for our everyday and scientific beliefs. According to this view, a sceptical argument is one that leads to the intuitively false conclusion that we cannot know anything. But there is another, much neglected and more radical form of scepticism, Pyrrhonism, which neither denies nor accepts the possibility of knowledge and is to be regarded not as a philosophical position so much as the expression (...)
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  6.  26
    Strategies and Models of Selective Attention1.M. T. Anne - 2012 - In Jeremy M. Wolfe & Lynn C. Robertson (eds.), From Perception to Consciousness: Searching with Anne Treisman. Oxford University Press. pp. 1.
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  7.  14
    Scepticism.Arne Naess - 1969 - Routledge.
    Originally published in 1968. Scepticism is generally regarded as a position which, if correct, would be disastrous for our everyday and scientific beliefs. According to this view, a sceptical argument is one that leads to the intuitively false conclusion that we cannot know anything. But there is another, much neglected and more radical form of scepticism, Pyrrhonism, which neither denies nor accepts the possibility of knowledge and is to be regarded not as a philosophical position so much as the expression (...)
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  8. Community, and Lifestyle, 144 and 159. Also See Sessions,".Ecology Naess - 2000 - Eco Philosophy, Utopias, and Education," and Arne Naess and Rob Jankling," Deep Ecology and Education: A Conversation with Arne Naess," Canadian Journal of Environmental Education 5.
     
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  9. Scepticism.Arne Naess - 1969 - Routledge.
    Originally published in 1968. Scepticism is generally regarded as a position which, if correct, would be disastrous for our everyday and scientific beliefs. According to this view, a sceptical argument is one that leads to the intuitively false conclusion that we cannot know anything. But there is another, much neglected and more radical form of scepticism, Pyrrhonism, which neither denies nor accepts the possibility of knowledge and is to be regarded not as a philosophical position so much as the expression (...)
     
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  10.  37
    The Experiences of Elderly People in Geriatric Care with Special Reference to Integrity.Ingrid Randers & Anne-Cathrine Mattiasson - 2000 - Nursing Ethics 7 (6):503-519.
    The aim of this study was to obtain an increased understanding of the experiences of elderly people in geriatric care, with special reference to integrity. Data were collected through qualitative interviews with elderly people and, in order to obtain a description of caregivers’ integrity-promoting or non-promoting behaviours, participant observations and qualitative interviews with nursing students were undertaken. Earlier studies on the integrity of elderly people mainly concentrated on their personal and territorial space, so Kihlgren and Thorsén opened up the possibility (...)
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  11.  22
    Confirming Older Adult Patients' Views of Who They Are and Would Like To Be.Ingrid Randers, Tina H. Olson & Anne-Cathrine Mattiasson - 2002 - Nursing Ethics 9 (4):416-431.
    This article reveals a 91-year-old cognitively intact man’s lived experiences of being cared for in a geriatric context in which the majority of the patients were cognitively impaired. A narrative patient story was analysed phenomenologically. The findings indicate that this patient’s basic needs for ethical care were not met. The staff did not see him as a unique individual with his own preferences, resources and abilities to master his life. In order to survive this lack of ethical care, he played (...)
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  12.  47
    Intimacy - Meeting Needs and Respecting Privacy in the Care of Elderly People: What is a Good Moral Attitude on the Part of the Nurse/Carer?Anne-Cathrine Mattiasson & Maja Hemberg - 1998 - Nursing Ethics 5 (6):527-534.
    This article explores notions of intimacy in the caring context. The aspects discussed are: privacy and intimacy; intimacy as emotional and/or physical closeness; intimacy as touch; sexual intimacy and normal ageing; sexual intimacy and patients suffering from dementia; and intimacy as trust. Examples are given and problems are identified, with reflection on the attitude and behaviour of the carer. It is suggested that when trying to make moral decisions in concrete situations it is imperative that the carer is aware of (...)
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  13.  25
    Nursing Home Staff Attitudes To Ethical Conflicts With Respect To Patient Autonomy and Paternalism.Anne-Cathrine Mattiasson & Lars Andersson - 1995 - Nursing Ethics 2 (2):115-130.
    Six case studies on nursing home staff attitudes to patient autonomy have been analysed. The case studies are based on six polarities within autonomy, as developed by Collopy. In total, 189 professional caregivers, comprising the staff of 13 nursing homes in the county of Stockholm, Sweden, responded to questions based on the case studies. Results show that the attitudes within each professional category had a high level of internal correspondence. Nurses consistently supported patient preferences to the highest degree, followed by (...)
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  14.  28
    Tarski’s 1944 Polemical Remarks and Naess’ “Experimental Philosophy”.Robert Barnard & Joseph Ulatowski - 2016 - Erkenntnis 81 (3):457-477.
    Many of Tarski’s better known papers are either about or include lengthy discussions of how to properly define various concepts: truth, logical consequence, semantic concepts, or definability. In general, these papers identify two primary conditions for successful definitions: formal correctness and material adequacy. Material adequacy requires that the concept expressed by the formal definition capture the intuitive content of truth. Our primary interest in this paper is to better understand Tarski’s thinking about material adequacy, and whether components of his view (...)
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  15. The Conway Letters: The Correspondence of Anne, Viscountess Conway, Henry More, and Their Friends, 1642-1684.Marjorie Hope Nicolson (ed.) - 1992 - Clarendon Press.
    A scholarly edition of letters by Anne, Viscountess Conway, Henry More, and their friends. The edition presents an authoritative text, together with an introduction, commentary notes, and scholarly apparatus.
     
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  16. A Critique of Mary Anne Warren's Weak Animal Rights View.Aaron Simmons - 2007 - Environmental Ethics 29 (3):267-278.
    In her book, Moral Status, Mary Anne Warren defends a comprehensive theory of the moral status of various entities. Under this theory, she argues that animals may have some moral rights but that their rights are much weaker in strength than the rights of humans, who have rights in the fullest, strongest sense. Subsequently, Warren believes that our duties to animals are far weaker than our duties to other humans. This weakness is especially evident from the fact that Warren believes (...)
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  17.  19
    Anne Berkeley’s Contrast: A Note.Stefan Storrie - 2011 - Berkeley Studies 22:9-14.
    This essay provides some historical background for, and considers the philosophical importance of, the collection of Anne Berkeley’s letters to Adam Gordon. The primary philosophical significance of the letters is her arguments against the so-called “free thinkers.” She discusses the philosophical view and the behavior of five prominent free-thinkers: Shaftesbury, Bolingbroke, Voltaire, Rousseau, and Hume. Her discussion of Shaftesbury is particularly illuminating and can be read as a commentary on Alciphron III.13-14. Because the work of the other four were published (...)
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  18.  16
    Neurath’s Congestions, Depth of Intention, and Precization: Arne Naess and His Viennese Heritage.Jan Radler - 2013 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 3 (1):59-90.
    In recent years, a significant amount of research has investigated the Vienna Circle’s ramifications. Otto Neurath has received much attention as one of the most prominent and energetic adherents, but less conspicuous philosophers now find themselves at the center of historical research. This article’s aim is to investigate Arne Naess’s connection to Logical Empiricism. Two crucial influences on Naess’s work are identified: Otto Neurath and the psychologist Egon Brunswik. This article’s most significant contributions are that, from the perspective (...)
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  19. Knowledge and Suffering in Early Modern Philosophy: G.W. Leibniz and Anne Conway.Christia Mercer - 2012 - In Sabrina Ebbersmeyer (ed.), Emotional Minds. De Gruyter. pp. 179.
  20. Verstehen, Einfhlen and Mental Simulation: Reply to Anne Rugh Mackor.Theo A. F. Kuipers - 2005 - In Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities. New York: Rodopi NY. pp. 263-267.
     
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  21. Is It Painful to Think: Conversations with Arne Naess.David Rothenberg - 1992 - Univ of Minnesota Press.
  22. On “Self-Realization” – The Ultimate Norm of Arne Naess’s Ecosophy T.Md Munir Hossain Talukder - 2016 - Symposion: Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences 3 (2):219-235.
    This paper considers the foundation of self-realization and the sense of morality that could justify Arne Naess’s claim ‘Self-realization is morally neutral,’ by focusing on the recent debate among deep ecologists. Self-realization, the ultimate norm of Naess’s ecosophy T, is the realization of the maxim ‘everything is interrelated.’ This norm seems to be based on two basic principles: the diminishing of narrow ego, and the integrity between the human and non-human worlds. The paper argues that the former is (...)
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  23. Love, Beauty, and Yeats's "Anne Gregory".Jeanette Bicknell - 2010 - Philosophy and Literature 34 (2):348-358.
    So begins "For Anne Gregory," published by W. B. Yeats in 1933. It is surely one of his most charming poems.1 The poem's lilting rhythm and affectionate tone effectively soften—even disguise—what is arguably a dark and dismaying message. Anne is destined to be loved not for herself alone, but for an accidental physical attribute—her blond hair. Why do I claim that the poem's message is dark? Why should it dismay Anne if she is loved for the beauty of her hair? (...)
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  24. Mary Anne Warren on “Full” Moral Status.Robert P. Lovering - 2004 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 42 (4):509-30.
    In the contemporary debate on moral status, it is not uncommon to find philosophers who embrace the following basic moral principle: -/- The Principle of Full Moral Status: The degree to which an entity E possesses moral status is proportional to the degree to which E possesses morally relevant properties until a threshold degree of morally relevant properties possession is reached, whereupon the degree to which E possesses morally relevant properties may continue to increase, but the degree to which E (...)
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  25.  14
    Arne Naess and Empirical Semantics.Siobhan Chapman - 2011 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 54 (1):18-30.
    ABSTRACT This article focuses on Arne Naess's work in the philosophy of language, which he began in the mid-1930s and continued into the 1960s. This aspect of his work is nowadays relatively neglected, but it deserves to be revisited. Firstly, it is intrinsically interesting to the history of analytic philosophy in the twentieth century, because Naess questioned some of the established philosophical methodologies and assumptions of his day. Secondly, it suggests a compelling but unacknowledged intellectual pedigree for some (...)
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  26. Philosophical Dialogues: Arne Naess and the Progress of Ecophilosophy.Nina Witoszek & Andrew Brennan - 2001 - Environmental Values 10 (3):418-421.
    The volume documents, and makes an original contribution to, an astonishing period in twentieth-century philosophy_the progress of Arne Naess's ecophilosophy from its inception to the present. It includes Naess's most crucial polemics with leading thinkers, drawn from sources as diverse as scholarly articles, correspondence, TV interviews and unpublished exchanges. The book testifies to the skeptical and self-correcting aspects of Naess's vision, which has deepened and broadened to include third world and feminist perspectives. Philosophical Dialogues is an essential (...)
     
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  27.  13
    Does Reproductive Justice Demand Insurance Coverage for IVF? Reflections on the Work of Anne Donchin.Carolyn McLeod - 2017 - Ijfab: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 10 (2):133-143.
    It was my absolute pleasure to be on a panel honoring Anne Donchin at the 2016 Congress of the International Network on Feminist Approaches to Bioethics. Anne was someone I always looked forward to seeing at the Congress because of her constant smile and wit. We also had very common research interests—in feminism, reproduction, families, autonomy, philosophy, and so on. This meant that we could usually dive in, without any preamble, to discussing what we were working on. Outside of FAB, (...)
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  28.  13
    In Appreciation of Anne Donchin's Life and Work.Laura Purdy - 2017 - Ijfab: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 10 (2):124-132.
    This article is an expansion of comments I was honored to present at a celebration of the life and work of Anne Donchin at the June 2016 meeting of the International Network on Feminist Approaches to Bioethics in Edinburgh. It is obviously far from comprehensive, but I hope it gives readers a glimpse of an Anne of whose depths many of us were not fully aware. One of the most difficult parts of talking about someone who has died is highlighting (...)
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  29.  18
    Hybrid-Logical Reasoning in the Smarties and Sally-Anne Tasks.Torben Braüner - 2014 - Journal of Logic, Language and Information 23 (4):415-439.
    The main aim of the present paper is to use a proof system for hybrid modal logic to formalize what are called false-belief tasks in cognitive psychology, thereby investigating the interplay between cognition and logical reasoning about belief. We consider two different versions of the Smarties task, involving respectively a shift of perspective to another person and to another time. Our formalizations disclose that despite this difference, the two versions of the Smarties task have exactly the same underlying logical structure. (...)
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  30.  22
    Time, Space, and Process in Anne Conway.Emily Thomas - 2017 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (5):990-1010.
    Many scholars have drawn attention to the way that elements of Anne Conway’s system anticipate ideas found in Leibniz. This paper explores the relationship between Conway and Leibniz’s work with regard to time, space, and process. It argues – against existing scholarship – that Conway is not a proto-Leibnizian relationist about time or space, and in fact her views lie much closer to those of Henry More; yet Conway and Leibniz agree on the primacy of process. This exploration advances our (...)
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  31.  54
    Naess's Deep Ecology Approach and Environmental Policy.Harold Glasser - 1996 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 39 (2):157 – 187.
    A clarification of Naess's ?depth metaphor? is offered. The relationship between Naess's empirical semantics and communication theory and his deep ecology approach to ecophilosophy (DEA) is developed. Naess's efforts to highlight significant conflicts by eliminating misunderstandings and promoting deep problematizing are focused upon. These insights are used to develop the implications of the DEA for environmental policy. Naess's efforts to promote the integration of science, ethics, and politics are related to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). (...)
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  32.  43
    Anne Frank's Tree: Thoughts on Domination and the Paradox of Progress.Eric Katz - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (3):283-293.
    Consider the significance of Anne Frank's horse chestnut tree. During her years of hiding in the secret annex, Anne thought of the tree as a symbol of freedom, happiness, and peace. As a stand-in for all of Nature, Anne saw the tree as that part of the universe that could not be destroyed by human evil. In this essay, I use Anne's tree as a starting point for a discussion of the domination of both nature and humanity. I connect the (...)
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  33.  71
    Anne Conway: Bodies in the Spiritual World.Marcy P. Lascano - 2013 - Philosophy Compass 8 (4):327-336.
    Anne Conway argues that all substances are spiritual. Yet, she also claims that all created substance has some type of body. Peter Loptson has argued that Conway didn’t carefully consider her view that all created beings have bodies for it seems God could have created only disembodied spirits. There are several reasons to think Loptson is right. First, Conway holds that God is all‐good and will do the best for his creation. She also holds that spirit is better than body. (...)
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  34.  32
    Was Arne Naess Recognized as the Founder of Deep Ecology Prematurely? Semantics and Environmental Philosophy.Benjamin Howe - 2010 - Environmental Ethics 32 (4):369-383.
    According to Arne Naess, his environmental philosophy is influenced by the philosophy of language called empirical semantics, which he first developed in the 1930s as a participant in the seminars of the Vienna Circle. While no one denies his claim, most of his commentators defend views about his environmental philosophy that contradict the tenets of his semantics. In particular, they argue that he holds that deep ecology’s supporters share a world view, and that the movement’s platform articulates shared principles. (...)
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  35.  11
    Anne Hampton Brewster's St. Martin's Summer and Utopian Literary Discourses.Etta M. Madden - 2017 - Utopian Studies 28 (2):305-326.
    When in 1866 American publisher Ticknor and Fields released St. Martin's Summer, Anne Hampton Brewster's second full-length novel, she was already the author of more than fifty short stories, poems, and essays that had appeared in such prominent venues as Godey's Lady's Book, Graham's American Monthly Magazine, Neal's Saturday Gazette, Lippincott's Magazine, the Atlantic Monthly, and Peterson's.1 Nonetheless, Brewster and this imaginative transformation of her first European Grand Tour in 1857–58, including interactions with utopian visionary and politician Robert Dale Owen, (...)
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  36.  18
    “A Kind of Metaphysician”: Arne Naess From Logical Empiricism to Ecophilosophy.Thomas Uebel - 2011 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 54 (1):78-109.
    ABSTRACT Arne Naess once called himself ?a kind of metaphysician?: did or did he not therewith turn his back on his philosophical mentors in the Vienna Circle? To try to determine the meaning of this self-ascription, this paper first considers in detail two works in which his disagreements with the philosophers of the Vienna Circle found their clearest and most detailed expression. Concentrating on Carnap it will be argued that while some of Naess's criticisms cannot be taken as (...)
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  37.  64
    Anne Viscountess Conway: A Seventeenth Century Rationalist.Jane Duran - 1989 - Hypatia 4 (1):64 - 79.
    The work of Spinoza, Descartes and Leibniz is cited in an attempt to develop, both expositorily and critically, the philosophy of Anne Viscountess Conway. Broadly, it is contended that Conway's metaphysics, epistemology and account of the passions not only bear intriguing comparison with the work of the other well-known rationalists, but supersede them in some ways, particularly insofar as the notions of substance and ontological hierarchy are concerned. Citing the commentary of Loptson and Carolyn Merchant, and alluding to other commentary (...)
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  38. Anne Conway: A Woman Philosopher.Sarah Hutton - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    This 2004 book was the first intellectual biography of one of the very first English women philosophers. At a time when very few women received more than basic education, Lady Anne Conway wrote an original treatise of philosophy, her Principles of the Most Ancient and Modern Philosophy, which challenged the major philosophers of her day - Descartes, Hobbes and Spinoza. Sarah Hutton's study places Anne Conway in her historical and philosophical context, by reconstructing her social and intellectual milieu. She traces (...)
     
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  39.  41
    Features and Objects in Visual Processing Anne Treisman.Anne Treisman - 2002 - In Daniel Levitin (ed.), Foundations of Cognitive Psychology: Core Readings. MIT Press. pp. 399.
  40.  9
    Gotteslehre Und Christologie in Anne Conway's "Principia Philosophiae": Frühchristlich-Patristische Einflüsse Und Merkmale.Josef Lossl - 2012 - In .
    Anne Conway, née Finch, is arguably one of the most important British philosophers of the seventeenth century. Her main work, published posthumously, in 1690, "Principia Philosophiae Antiquissimae et Recentissimae", translated two years later into English as "The Principles of the Most Ancient and Modern Philosophy: Concerning God, Christ, and the Creature; that is, concerning Spirit and Matter in General", engages critically with most relevant thinkers of her time, in particular Descartes, Hobbes, Spinoza, and her friend and mentor Henry More. As (...)
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  41.  17
    Callicott and Naess on Pluralism.Andrew Light - 1996 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 39 (2):273 – 294.
    J. Baird Callicott has thrown down the gauntlet once again in the monism?pluralism debate in environmental ethics. In a recent article he argues that his ?communitarianism? (combined with a limited intertheoretic pluralism) is sufficient to get the advantages of pluralism advocated by his critics, while at the same time retaining the framework of moral monism. Callicott's attempt to set the record straight on the monism?pluralism debate has once again derailed us from answering the most important question in this discussion: how (...)
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  42.  7
    The Experimental and the Empirical: Arne Naess' Statistical Approach to Philosophy.Siobhan Chapman - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (5):961-981.
    ABSTRACTExperimental philosophy often draws its data from questionnaire-based surveys of ordinary intuitions. Its proponents are keen to identify antecedents in the work of philosophers who have referred to intuition and everyday understanding [e.g. Knobe, Joshua, and Shaun Nichols, ‘An Experimental Philosophy Manifesto’. In Experimental Philosophy, edited by Joshua Knobe and Shaun Nichols, 3–14. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007]. In this context, ‘Empirical Semantics’, pioneered by Arne Naess early in the twentieth century, offers striking parallels. Naess believed that much (...)
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  43.  4
    No World but in Things: The Poetry of Naess's Concrete Contents.David Rothenberg - 1996 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 39 (2):255 – 272.
    Arne Naess introduced the notion of ?concrete contents? to posit that the qualities we perceive in nature are intrinsic to the things themselves, and not just projections of our senses on to the world. This gives environmentalism more credence than if secondary qualities about the environment are considered subjective in a pejorative sense. But the concrete contents position pushes philosophy toward poetry because it suggests that felt qualities are as primary as logic. For a philosophy to justify itself, it (...)
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  44.  16
    Anne-Marie Doyen-Higuet, L'Épitomé de la Collection d'Hippiatrie Grecque.Anne McCabe - 2009 - Byzantinische Zeitschrift 102 (1).
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  45.  48
    Anne O'Byrne: Natality and Finitude. [REVIEW]Jeffrey Epstein - 2012 - Continental Philosophy Review 45 (1):153-159.
    Anne O’Byrne: Natality and finitude Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 1-7 DOI 10.1007/s11007-011-9203-8 Authors Jeffrey Epstein, SUNY Stony Brook, 213 Harriman Hall, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3750, USA Journal Continental Philosophy Review Online ISSN 1573-1103 Print ISSN 1387-2842.
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  46.  45
    Arne Naess and the Task of Gestalt Ontology.Christian Diehm - 2006 - Environmental Ethics 28 (1):21-35.
    While much of Arne Naess’s ecosophy underscores the importance of understanding one’s ecological Self, his analyses of gestaltism are significant in that they center less on questions of the self than on questions of nature and what is other-than-human. Rather than the realization of a more expansive Self, gestalt ontology calls for a “gestalt shift” in our thinking about nature, one that allows for its intrinsic value to emerge clearly. Taking such a gestalt shift as a central task enables (...)
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  47. Philosophical Dialogues: Arne Naess and the Progress of Philosophy.Nina Witoszek & Andrew Brennan (eds.) - 1999 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    The volume documents, and makes an original contribution to, an astonishing period in twentieth-century philosophy—the progress of Arne Naess's ecophilosophy from its inception to the present. It includes Naess's most crucial polemics with leading thinkers, drawn from sources as diverse as scholarly articles, correspondence, TV interviews and unpublished exchanges. The book testifies to the skeptical and self-correcting aspects of Naess's vision, which has deepened and broadened to include third world and feminist perspectives. Philosophical Dialogues is an essential (...)
     
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  48.  30
    Reciprocal Effects of Attention and Perception: Comments on Anne Treisman's "How the Deployment of Attention Determines What We See".Shaul Hochstein - 2012 - In Jeremy M. Wolfe & Lynn C. Robertson (eds.), From Perception to Consciousness: Searching with Anne Treisman. Oxford University Press. pp. 278.
  49.  3
    Anne Querrien, La Borde, Guattari and Left Movements in France, 1965–81.Anne Querrien & Constantin Boundas - 2016 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 10 (3):395-416.
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    Anne-Marie SOHN, Chrysalides. Femmes dans la vie privée (XIXe-XXe siècles). Publications de la Sorbonne, 1, 1996. 2 volumes. [REVIEW]Yvonne Knibiehler - 1999 - Clio: A Journal of Literature, History, and the Philosophy of History 1:30-30.
    Cette thèse en impose par la masse de travail qu'elle représente, mais plus encore par les questions qu'elle pose à l'histoire des femmes et par l'éclairage nouveau qu'elle apporte sur les milieux populaires. La vie privée a reçu droit de cité en histoire grâce à la haute approbation de Philippe Ariès et de Georges Duby (ainsi que de leurs nombreux collaborateurs). Le concept de vie privée reste pourtant difficile à cerner. La première audace d'Anne Marie Sohn consiste à donner une (...)
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