Results for 'Anne-Laure P. Winkler'

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  1.  15
    Employees as Conduits for Effective Stakeholder Engagement: An Example From B Corporations.Anne-Laure P. Winkler, Jill A. Brown & David L. Finegold - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-24.
    Is there a link between how a firm manages its internal and external stakeholders? More specifically, are firms that give employees stock ownership and more say in running the enterprise more likely to engage with external stakeholders? This study seeks to answer these questions by elaborating on mechanisms that link employees to external stakeholders, such as the community, suppliers, and the environment. It tests these relationships using a sample of 347 private, mostly small-to-medium size firms, which completed a stakeholder impact (...)
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  2.  22
    The Principles of the Most Ancient and Modern Philosophy.Kenneth P. Winkler, Anne Conway, Allison P. Coudert & Taylor Corse - 1999 - Philosophical Review 108 (4):585.
    Anne Conway’s Principles of the Most Ancient and Modern Philosophy, first published in 1690, is probably the most ambitious contribution to early modern metaphysics by a woman writing in the English language. This beautifully prepared edition makes Conway’s treatise available to twentieth-century readers in an accessible English translation of the 1690 Latin text—itself a translation of an original English manuscript that has long been lost.
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  3.  74
    P.J.E. Kail's Projection and Realism in Hume's Philosophy. [REVIEW]Kenneth P. Winkler - 2010 - Philosophical Books 51 (3):144-159.
  4. Berkeley: An Interpretation.Kenneth P. Winkler - 1989 - Oxford University Press UK.
    David Hume wrote that Berkeley's arguments `admit of no answer but produce no conviction'. This book aims at the kind of understanding of Berkeley's philosophy that comes from seeing how we ourselves might be brought to embrace it. Berkeley held that matter does not exist, and that the sensations we take to be caused by an indifferent and independent world are instead caused directly by God. Nature becomes a text, with no existence apart from the spirits who transmit and receive (...)
     
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  5.  21
    Anne-Laure Zwilling, Frères et soeurs dans la Bible. Les relations fraternelles dans l'Ancien et dans le Nouveau Testament. Préface de Daniel Marguerat. Paris, Les Éditions du Cerf (coll. « Lectio divina », 238), 2010, iv-205 p. [REVIEW]Ai Nguyen Chi - 2012 - Laval Théologique et Philosophique 68 (2):513.
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  6.  17
    Philosophy Gone Wild Holmes Rolston III New York: Prometheus Books, 1989, 269 P.Earl Winkler - 1991 - Dialogue 30 (1-2):184-.
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  7. A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge.Kenneth P. Winkler (ed.) - 1982 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    Kenneth Winkler's esteemed edition of Berkeley's _Principles_ is based on the second edition, the last one published in Berkeley's lifetime. Life other members of Hackett's philosophical classics series, it features editorial elements found to be of particular value to students and their teachers: analytical table of contents; chronology of the author's life; selected bibliography; note on the text; glossary; and index.
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  8. The New Hume.Kenneth P. Winkler - 1991 - Philosophical Review 100 (4):541-579.
  9.  20
    Berkeley and the Doctrine of Signs.Kenneth P. Winkler - 2005 - In Kenneth Winkler (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Berkeley. Cambridge University Press. pp. 125.
  10.  46
    The Cambridge Companion to Berkeley.Kenneth P. Winkler (ed.) - 2005 - Cambridge University Press.
    George Berkeley is one of the greatest and most influential modern philosophers. In defending the immaterialism for which he is most famous, he redirected modern thinking about the nature of objectivity and the mind's capacity to come to terms with it. Along the way, he made striking and influential proposals concerning the psychology of the senses, the workings of language, the aims of science, and the scope of mathematics. In this Companion volume a team of distinguished authors not only examines (...)
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  11.  37
    Continuous Creation1.Kenneth P. Winkler - 2011 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 35 (1):287-309.
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  12.  40
    “All Is Revolution in Us”: Personal Identity in Shaftesbury and Hume.Kenneth P. Winkler - 2000 - Hume Studies 26 (1):3-40.
    Even philosophers who believe there is a single “problem of personal identity” conceive of that problem in different ways. They differ not only in their ways of stating the problem, but in the parts of philosophy to which they assign it, and in the resources they feel entitled to call upon in their attempts to deal with it. My topic in this paper is an eighteenth-century uncertainty about the place within philosophy of the problem of personal identity. Is it a (...)
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  13.  40
    Berkeley's Idealism: A Critical Examination. [REVIEW]Kenneth P. Winkler - 2014 - Philosophical Review 123 (4):541-544.
  14. Berkeley and Kant.Kenneth P. Winkler - 2008 - In Daniel Garber & Béatrice Longuenesse (eds.), Kant and the Early Moderns. Princeton University Press.
  15.  98
    Berkeley on Abstract Ideas.Kenneth P. Winkler - 1983 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 65 (1):63-80.
    There are three propositions that this author demonstrates in his argument: the contention that berkeley 's attack on abstract ideas is not made wholly compatible with his atomic sensationalism, that berkeley does not provide or employ a single definition or criterion for determining the limit of abstraction and that the doctrine of abstract ideas furnishes no real support to berkeley 's argument against the existence of material substance independent of perception.
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  16. An Essay Concerning Human Understanding.Kenneth P. Winkler (ed.) - 1996 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    Includes generous selections from the Essay, topically arranged passages from the replies to Stillingfleet, a chronology, a bibliography, a glossary, and an index based on the entries that Locke himself devised.
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  17.  6
    Chapter 8. Berkeley and Kant.Kenneth P. Winkler - 2008 - In Béatrice Longuenesse & Daniel Garber (eds.), Kant and the Early Moderns. Princeton University Press. pp. 142-171.
  18. Locke on Personal Identity.Kenneth P. Winkler - 1998 - In Vere Chappell (ed.), Locke. Oxford University Press.
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  19.  19
    Berkeley: The Central Arguments.Kenneth P. Winkler - 1992 - Idealistic Studies 22 (3):300-301.
    Emerson said that idealism sees the world in God: not as “painfully accumulated, atom after atom, act after act, in a aged creeping Past,” but as “a vast picture” painted by God “on the instant eternity.” Emerson’s portrait fits A.C. Grayling’s Berkeley, who sees the world in an infinite spirit whose power is unfailing and ubiquitous. Berkeley’s arguments, Grayling suggests, move at three levels, and at the metaphysical level, God’s activity accounts for what occurs at the level of sensory experience (...)
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  20.  13
    Essays on Berkeley: A Tercentennial Celebration. [REVIEW]Kenneth P. Winkler - 1989 - Noûs 23 (2):263-265.
  21.  36
    British Philosophy in the Seventeenth Century by Sarah Hutton.Kenneth P. Winkler - 2016 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 54 (4):677-678.
    Most of our histories of philosophy, in our books and especially in our courses, are what William James called “appreciative chronicle[s] of human master-strokes”. They resemble tours of grand and isolated monuments. Sarah Hutton’s magnificent British Philosophy in the Seventeenth Century is a different kind of history, in which masterpieces are placed in conversation with books that are now neglected or all but forgotten. By means of this “conversation model,” Hutton provides what she justly terms “a ‘thick description’ of seventeenth-century (...)
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  22.  25
    Hutcheson and Hume on the Color of Virtue.Kenneth P. Winkler - 1996 - Hume Studies 22 (1):3-22.
  23. Ideas, Sentiments, and Qualities.Kenneth P. Winkler - 1992 - In Phillip D. Cummins (ed.), Minds, Ideas, and Objects: Essays in the Theory of Representation in Modern Philosophy. Ridgeview Publishing Company.
  24. Kant, the Empiricists, and the Enterprise of Deduction.Kenneth P. Winkler - 2010 - In Paul Guyer (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. Cambridge University Press.
  25.  27
    Locke's Philosophy of Language ‐ By Walter Ott.Kenneth P. Winkler - 2007 - Philosophical Books 48 (1):76-78.
  26.  5
    Berkeley: An Introduction. [REVIEW]Kenneth P. Winkler - 1991 - Philosophical Review 100 (2):329.
  27.  73
    Signification, Intention, Projection.Kenneth P. Winkler - 2009 - Philosophia 37 (3):477-501.
    Locke is what present-day aestheticians, critics, and historians call an intentionalist. He believes that when we interpret speech and writing, we aim—in large part and perhaps even for the most part—to recover the intentions, or intended meanings, of the speaker or writer. Berkeley and Hume shared Locke’s commitment to intentionalism, but it is a theme that recent philosophical interpreters of all three writers have left largely unexplored. In this paper I discuss the bearing of intentionalism on more familiar themes in (...)
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  28.  40
    Scepticism and Anti-Realism.Kenneth P. Winkler - 1985 - Mind 94 (373):36-52.
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  29.  53
    Berkeley, Newton and the Stars.Kenneth P. Winkler - 1986 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 17 (1):23-42.
  30.  19
    Van Cleve and Reid on Conceptions and Qualities.Kenneth P. Winkler - 2016 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 93 (1):225-231.
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  31. Hume and the Sensible Qualities.Kenneth P. Winkler - 2011 - In Lawrence Nolan (ed.), Primary and Secondary Qualities: The Historical and Ongoing Debate. Oxford University Press.
  32.  33
    Berkeley on Volition, Power, and the Complexity of Causation.Kenneth P. Winkler - 1985 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 2 (1):53 - 69.
  33.  36
    Early Modern Intentionalism: Replies to LoLordo’s Comments.Kenneth P. Winkler - 2009 - Philosophia 37 (3):507-509.
    I clarify Locke’s intentionalism and explain what we might gain by paying more attention to the role of linguistic intentions in the work of the British empiricists.
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  34.  24
    Descartes and the Names of God.Kenneth P. Winkler - 1993 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 67 (4):451-466.
  35.  23
    Grades of Cartesian Innateness.Kenneth P. Winkler - 1993 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 1 (2):23 – 44.
  36.  7
    Berkeley: The Central Arguments. [REVIEW]Kenneth P. Winkler - 1992 - Idealistic Studies 22 (3):300-301.
    Emerson said that idealism sees the world in God: not as “painfully accumulated, atom after atom, act after act, in a aged creeping Past,” but as “a vast picture” painted by God “on the instant eternity.” Emerson’s portrait fits A.C. Grayling’s Berkeley, who sees the world in an infinite spirit whose power is unfailing and ubiquitous. Berkeley’s arguments, Grayling suggests, move at three levels, and at the metaphysical level, God’s activity accounts for what occurs at the level of sensory experience (...)
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  37.  5
    Empiricism and Multiculturalism.Kenneth P. Winkler - 2004 - Philosophic Exchange 34 (1).
    This paper relates the work of the great British empiricists – Locke, Berkeley, and Hume – to issues of multiculturalism. It is argued that these philosophers can help to provide us with some of the tools we need to craft an appropriate response to the diversity of cultures.
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  38.  3
    "Essays on Berkeley: A Tercentennial Celebration" Edited by John Foster and Howard Robinson. [REVIEW]Kenneth P. Winkler - 1989 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 49 (3):529.
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  39. Residential Assimilation and Residential Attainment: Examining the Effects of Ethnicity and Immigration.Michael J. White, Sharon Sassler, S. Kirchengast, E. M. Winkler, D. L. Blackwell, Y. Weiss, R. J. Willis, B. J. Oddens, P. Lehert & F. Kalter - 1996 - Journal of Biosocial Science 28 (2):193-210.
     
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  40.  53
    Comments on Kenneth P. Winkler’s “Signification, Intention, Projection”.Antonia LoLordo - 2009 - Philosophia 37 (3):503-505.
    These are my comments on Ken Winkler's account of Locke's philosophy of language.
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  41.  13
    Berkeley: An Interpretation by Kenneth P. Winkler[REVIEW]Alan R. White - 1989 - Philosophical Books 30 (4):213-215.
  42.  5
    Kenneth P. Winkler, Ed. The Cambridge Companion to Berkeley. [REVIEW]Silvia Parigi - 2007 - Philosophy in Review 27 (5):388-390.
  43.  5
    Anne-Laure Angouivent, Hobbes ou la crise de l'État baroque.Hervé Pasqua - 1993 - Revue Philosophique De Louvain 91 (91):471-472.
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  44.  31
    Anne COVA, Maternité et droits des femmes en France, XIXe-XXe siècles, Paris, Anthropos, coll. Historiques, 1997, 435 p. [REVIEW]Christine Bard - 1998 - Clio: A Journal of Literature, History, and the Philosophy of History 2:22-22.
    Anne Cova s'est emparée d'un sujet central pour l'histoire des femmes : la maternité. En 1977, Catherine Fouquet et Yvonne Knibiehler avaient publié la première synthèse, Histoire des mères du Moyen Age à nos jours. Élisabeth Badinter, en 1980, attirait elle aussi, avec L'Amour en plus, l'attention du public sur l'historicité du sentiment maternel, soulignant la mutation survenue au XVIIIe siècle : début de la limitation des naissances, rapprochement de la mère et de l'enfant, valorisa..
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  45.  36
    P. Dräger: D. Magnus Ausonius: Mosella, Bissula, Briefwechsel MIT Paulinus Nolanus . Pp. 320. Dusseldorf and Zurich: Artemis & Winkler, 2002. Cased, €30.70. ISBN: 3-7608-1729-7. [REVIEW]Roger Green - 2003 - The Classical Review 53 (2):489-490.
  46.  57
    Anne-Marie VÉRILHAC, Claude VIAL, Le mariage grec du vie siècle avant J.-C. à l'époque d'Auguste, Paris, De Boccard, 1998, 412 p. + 5 p. de planches. [REVIEW]Jérôme Wilgaux - 2001 - Clio 14:245-246.
    Acte essentiellement privé, le mariage grec a pour traits constants, aux époques classique et hellénistique, la dation de la mariée au marié par son père (ekdosis), ainsi que le versement d'une dot directe (proïx ou phernè) par le père ou son substitut. La riche monographie que lui consacrent A.-M. Vérilhac et Cl. Vial, à l'issue d'une collaboration de plus de dix ans, leur permet d'en étudier les différentes dimensions (sociale, économique, juridique, rituelle…) et d'en souligner ains..
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  47.  52
    Flora Tristan, la Paria Et Son Rêve, Correspondance Établie Par Stéphane Michaud, Préface de Mario Vargas Llosa, Presses Sorbonne Nouvelle, Paris, 2003, 342 P. ; Mario Vargas Llosa, El Paraíso En la Otra Esquina, Madrid, Alfaguara, 2003, 485 P. / le Paradis Un Peu Plus Loin, Trad. Albert Bensoussan Et Anne-Marie Cases, Paris, Gallimard, 2003, 530 P. [REVIEW]Marie-cécile Benassy - 2003 - Clio 18:294-296.
  48.  10
    Anne-Lise Darras-Worms, Plotin, Traité 31 : Sur la beauté intelligible. Introduction, traduction, commentaire et notes. Paris, Librairie Philosophique J. Vrin , 2018, 303 p. [REVIEW]Richard Dufour - 2018 - Laval Théologique et Philosophique 74 (2):324.
  49.  27
    Anne-Marie Décaillot, Cantor et la France. Correspondance du mathématicien allemand avec les Français à la fin du xixe siècle, Paris, Éditions Kimé, 2008, 347 p.Anne-Marie Décaillot, Cantor et la France. Correspondance du mathématicien allemand avec les Français à la fin du xixe siècle, Paris, Éditions Kimé, 2008, 347 p. [REVIEW]Mark van Atten - 2010 - Philosophiques 37 (1):262-265.
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  50.  5
    Correspondance Sur la Philosophie, la Logique Et la Politique Louis Couturat, Bertrand Russell, Anne-Françoise Schmid Kimé, Paris, 2002, 735 P. [REVIEW]J. Dumoncel - 2003 - Nature Sciences Sociétés 11 (2):214-217.
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