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Annelies Monseré
University of Ghent
  1.  33
    Non-Western Art and the Concept of Art: Can Cluster Theories of Art Account for the Universality of Art?Annelies Monseré - 2012 - Estetika 49 (2):148-165.
    This essay seeks to demonstrate that there are no compelling reasons to exclude non-Western artefacts from the domain of art. Any theory of art must therefore account for the universality of the concept of art. It cannot simply start from ‘our’ art traditions and extend these conceptions to other cultures, since this would imply cultural appropriation, nor can it resolve the matter simply by formulating separate criteria for non-Western art, since this would imply that there is no unity in the (...)
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  2.  50
    Borderline Cases and the Project of Defining Art.Annelies Monseré - 2016 - Acta Analytica 31 (4):463-479.
    Most philosophers of art assume that there are three categories with regard to arthood, namely ‘art’, ‘artful’ and ‘non-art’ and that, therefore, a definition must be able to account for ‘artful items’, also called ‘borderline cases of art’. This article, however, defends the thesis that, since there is no agreement over which items fall under the category ‘artful’, the ability to account for borderline cases of art should not be used as a criterion for evaluating definitions of art. The defended (...)
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  3.  58
    Experimental Philosophy and Intuitions on What is Art and What is Not.Annelies Monseré - 2015 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 34 (3).
    It is generally agreed upon that philosophers of art rely on their intuitions to justify or criticize proposed definitions of art. Experimental philosophers, however, have questioned the role of intuition in philosophy, since empirical research shows that philosophers’ intuitions are neither widely shared nor reliable sources of justification. This article aims to apply these experimental challenges to the project of defining art. It will be demonstrated that while experimentalists are right in claiming that philosophers' intuitions cannot be used as epistemic (...)
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  4.  35
    The Charge From Psychology and Art's Definition.Annelies Monseré - 2016 - Theoria 82 (3):256-273.
    This article argues that the so-called Charge from Psychology does not refute the project of defining art. The charge entails that the project is misguided because it falsely presupposes that the concept of art is classically structured. The charge is challenged by distinguishing philosophers’ normative from psychologists’ descriptive aims. Unlike what many philosophers of art themselves believe, defining art is a normative project, since proposed definitions formulate conditions under which the concept of art should be applied, rather than is applied. (...)
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  5.  27
    Why We Need a Theory of Art.Annelies Monseré - 2016 - Estetika 53 (2):165-183.
    In this article, I argue against Dominic McIver Lopes’s claim that nobody needs a theory of art. On the one hand, I will demonstrate that Lopes’s alternative to theories of art – namely, the buck-passing theory of art – is neither more viable nor more fruitful: it is likewise incapable of resolving disagreement over the status of certain artefacts and of being fruitful for the broader field of the arts. On the other hand, I will defend the view that we (...)
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  6.  35
    The Role of Intuitions in the Philosophy of Art.Annelies Monseré - 2015 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 58 (7-8):806-827.
    According to Herman Cappelen and Bernard Molyneux, it is widely assumed that intuitions are used as evidence for philosophical theories in all areas of philosophy. Philosophers’ self-image, however, is wrong. This wrong self-image, so they argue, has merely misled metaphilosophers, but has had no substantial implications for philosophical practices. This article examines the role of intuitions in the project of defining art. In accordance with Cappelen and Molyneux, I demonstrate that philosophers of art believe intuitions are used as evidence for (...)
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  7.  13
    Evaluating the Aims and Methods of Defining Art: A Metaphilosophical Investigation Regarding the Question 'What is Art?'.Annelies Monseré - unknown
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  8. Incommensurable Aims in the Philosophy of Art.Annelies Monseré - unknown
    This article argues that philosophers of art wrongly aim for their definitions of art to be both descriptively and normatively adequate, for the method that is used to achieve both aims, namely the method of reflective equilibrium, is not applicable to the project of defining art. Therefore, in order to facilitate genuine debate regarding definitions of art, philosophers must abandon the method of reflective equilibrium and determine which approach, be it descriptive or normative, deems more appropriate.
     
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