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  1.  25
    Prenatal Screening: An Ethical Agenda for the Near Future.Antina Jong & Guido M. W. R. Wert - 2015 - Bioethics 29 (1):46-55.
    Prenatal screening for foetal abnormalities such as Down's syndrome differs from other forms of population screening in that the usual aim of achieving health gains through treatment or prevention does not seem to apply. This type of screening leads to no other options but the choice between continuing or terminating the pregnancy and can only be morally justified if its aim is to provide meaningful options for reproductive choice to pregnant women and their partners. However, this aim should not be (...)
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  2.  49
    The New Genetics and Informed Consent: Differentiating Choice to Preserve Autonomy.Eline M. Bunnik, Antina Jong, Niels Nijsingh & Guido M. W. R. Wert - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (6):348-355.
    The advent of new genetic and genomic technologies may cause friction with the principle of respect for autonomy and demands a rethinking of traditional interpretations of the concept of informed consent. Technologies such as whole-genome sequencing and micro-array based analysis enable genome-wide testing for many heterogeneous abnormalities and predispositions simultaneously. This may challenge the feasibility of providing adequate pre-test information and achieving autonomous decision-making. At a symposium held at the 11th World Congress of Bioethics in June 2012 (Rotterdam), organized by (...)
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  3.  24
    Prenatal Screening: Current Practice, New Developments, Ethical Challenges.Antina Jong, Idit Maya & Jan M. M. Lith - 2015 - Bioethics 29 (1):1-8.
    Prenatal screening pathways, as nowadays offered in most Western countries consist of similar tests. First, a risk-assessment test for major aneuploides is offered to pregnant women. In case of an increased risk, invasive diagnostic tests, entailing a miscarriage risk, are offered. For decades, only conventional karyotyping was used for final diagnosis. Moreover, several foetal ultrasound scans are offered to detect major congenital anomalies, but the same scans also provide relevant information for optimal support of the pregnancy and the delivery. Recent (...)
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