Results for 'Ap Professional'

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  1.  10
    The Influence of Program Format on the Professional Development of Science Teachers: Teacher Perceptions of AP and Honors Science Courses.Norman Edward Herr - 1991 - Science Education 75 (6):619-629.
  2.  35
    Debates and Reasoning in Business and Professional Ethics.David Bevan - 2014 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 33 (2-3):191-203.
    I am grateful to the Editors of for the opportunity to respond to the address given by Steve Williams at the Vincentian Conference of 2013, and published in the preceding pages. Mr. Williams takes the 2008 crisis of Western capitalism as his focus and offers at least two distinct narratives: in the first of these he outlines his experience of an extensive and complex professional, commercial world in. In a more extensive, second theme he offers some constructive suggestions as (...)
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  3.  34
    Professional Ethics Considerations of Research Ethics Board Members in Canada.Maureen Muldoon - 2006 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 25 (1/4):67-80.
    This paper explores issues of professional ethics that are relevant to those who engage in the ethical review of research with human subjects. Codes of ethics of a number of professional groups are examined for guidance offered to research ethics board members. The thought of the philosopher, Mike Martin, is introduced as a way to highlight some of the ethical issues that reviewers encounter in their work. Martin believes that ideals contribute to the coherence of an individual’s life (...)
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  4.  98
    Virtue Ethics and Professional Roles.Justin Oakley & Dean Cocking - 2001 - Cambridge University Press.
    Professionals, it is said, have no use for simple lists of virtues and vices. The complexities and constraints of professional roles create peculiar moral demands on the people who occupy them, and traits that are vices in ordinary life are praised as virtues in the context of professional roles. Should this disturb us, or is it naive to presume that things should be otherwise? Taking medical and legal practice as key examples, Justin Oakley and Dean Cocking develop a (...)
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  5. Ethics in Professional Life: Virtues for Health and Social Care.Sarah Banks - 2009 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    The domain of professional ethics -- Virtue, ethics, and professional life -- Virtues, vices, and situations -- Professional wisdom -- Care -- Respectfulness -- Trustworthiness -- Justice -- Courage -- Integrity.
     
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  6.  22
    Ethics for Adversaries: The Morality of Roles in Public and Professional Life.Arthur Isak Applbaum - 2000 - Princeton University Press.
    The adversary professions--law, business, and government, among others--typically claim a moral permission to violate persons in ways that, if not for the professional role, would be morally wrong. Lawyers advance bad ends and deceive, business managers exploit and despoil, public officials enforce unjust laws, and doctors keep confidences that, if disclosed, would prevent harm. Ethics for Adversaries is a philosophical inquiry into arguments that are offered to defend seemingly wrongful actions performed by those who occupy what Montaigne called "necessary (...)
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  7.  37
    Managing Ethical Difficulties in Healthcare: Communicating in Inter-Professional Clinical Ethics Support Sessions.Catarina Fischer Grönlund, Vera Dahlqvist, Karin Zingmark, Mikael Sandlund & Anna Söderberg - 2016 - HEC Forum 28 (4):321-338.
    Several studies show that healthcare professionals need to communicate inter-professionally in order to manage ethical difficulties. A model of clinical ethics support inspired by Habermas’ theory of discourse ethics has been developed by our research group. In this version of CES sessions healthcare professionals meet inter-professionally to communicate and reflect on ethical difficulties in a cooperative manner with the aim of reaching communicative agreement or reflective consensus. In order to understand the course of action during CES, the aim of this (...)
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  8.  54
    The Ground of Professional Ethics.Daryl Koehn - 1994 - Routledge.
    As each week beings more stories of doctors, lawyers and other professionals abusing their powers, while clients demand extra services as at a time of shrinking resources; it is imperative that all practising professionals have an understanding of professional ethics. In _The Ground of Profesional Ethics_, Daryl Koehn discusses the practical issues in depth, such as the level of service clients can justifiably expect from professionals, when service to a client may be legitimately terminated and circumstances in which client (...)
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  9. Professional Ethical Standards, Corporate Social Responsibility, and the Perceived Role of Ethics and Social Responsibility.Sean Valentine & Gary Fleischman - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (3):657-666.
    This study explored several proposed relationships among professional ethical standards, corporate social responsibility, and the perceived role of ethics and social responsibility. Data were collected from 313 business managers registered with a large professional research association with a mailed self-report questionnaire. Mediated regression analysis indicated that perceptions of corporate social responsibility partially mediated the positive relationship between perceived professional ethical standards and the believed importance of ethics and social responsibility. Perceptions of corporate social responsibility also fully mediated (...)
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  10. Meaningful Work: Rethinking Professional Ethics.Mike W. Martin - 2000 - Oxford University Press.
    As commonly understood, professional ethics consists of shared duties and episodic dilemmas--the responsibilities incumbent on all members of specific professions joined together with the dilemmas that arise when these responsibilities conflict. Martin challenges this "consensus paradigm" as he rethinks professional ethics to include personal commitments and ideals, of which many are not mandatory. Using specific examples from a wide range of professions, including medicine, law, high school teaching, journalism, engineering, and ministry, he explores how personal commitments motivate, guide, (...)
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  11.  41
    Does Academic Dishonesty Relate to Unethical Behavior in Professional Practice? An Exploratory Study.Donald D. Carpenter, Trevor S. Harding, Cynthia J. Finelli & Honor J. Passow - 2004 - Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (2):311-324.
    Previous research indicates that students in engineering self-report cheating in college at higher rates than those in most other disciplines. Prior work also suggests that participation in one deviant behavior is a reasonable predictor of future deviant behavior. This combination of factors leads to a situation where engineering students who frequently participate in academic dishonesty are more likely to make unethical decisions in professional practice. To investigate this scenario, we propose the hypotheses that (1) there are similarities in the (...)
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  12.  82
    Contents of Codes of Ethics of Professional Business Organizations in the United States.Bruce R. Gaumnitz & John C. Lere - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 35 (1):35 - 49.
    This paper reports an analysis of the content of the codes of ethics of 15 professional business organizations in the United States, representing the broad range of disciplines found in business. The analysis was conducted to identify common ethical issues faced by business professionals. It was also structured to highlight ethical issues that are either unique to or of particular importance for business professionals. No attempt is made to make value judgments about either the codes of ethics studied or (...)
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  13.  22
    Conscientious Objection, Professional Duty and Compromise: A Response to Savulescu and Schuklenk.Jonathan A. Hughes - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (2):126-131.
    In a recent article in this journal, Savulescu and Schuklenk defend and extend their earlier arguments against a right to medical conscientious objection in response to criticisms raised by Cowley. I argue that while it would be preferable to be less accommodating of medical conscientious than many countries currently are, Savulescu and Schuklenk's argument that conscientious objection is ‘simply unprofessional’ is mistaken. The professional duties of doctors should be defined in relation to the interests of patients and society, and (...)
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  14. Beyond the Game: Perceptions and Practices of Corporate Social Responsibility in the Professional Sport Industry.Hela Sheth & Kathy M. Babiak - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 91 (3):433-450.
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is an area of great interest, yet little is known about how CSR is perceived and practiced in the professional sport industry. This study employs a mixed-methods approach, including a survey, and a qualitative content analysis of responses to open-ended questions, to explore how professional sport executives define CSR, and what priorities teams have regarding their CSR activities. Findings from this study indicate that sport executives placed different emphases on elements of CSR including a (...)
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  15.  65
    Future Directions in Engineering Ethics Research: Microethics, Macroethics and the Role of Professional Societies.Joseph R. Herkert - 2001 - Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (3):403-414.
    Three frames of reference for engineering ethics are discussed—individual, professional and social—which can be further broken down into “microethics” concerned with individuals and the internal relations of the engineering profession and “macroethics” referring to the collective social responsibility of the engineering profession and to societal decisions about technology. Few attempts have been made at integrating microethical and macroethical approaches to engineering ethics. The approach suggested here is to focus on the role of professional engineering societies in linking individual (...)
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  16.  11
    Bashar H. Malkawi, Signing Ceremony of MOU on Professional Legal Diploma, Government of Dubai 2020.Bashar H. Malkawi - 2020 - Dubai Legal Periodical 2:1.
    Signing Ceremony of MOU on Professional Legal Diploma, Government of Dubai 2020.
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  17. Professional Virtue and Professional Self-Awareness: A Case Study in Engineering Ethics.Preston Stovall - 2011 - Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (1):109-132.
    This paper articulates an Aristotelian theory of professional virtue and provides an application of that theory to the subject of engineering ethics. The leading idea is that Aristotle’s analysis of the definitive function of human beings, and of the virtues humans require to fulfill that function, can serve as a model for an analysis of the definitive function or social role of a profession and thus of the virtues professionals must exhibit to fulfill that role. Special attention is given (...)
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  18. Is Conscientious Objection Incompatible with a Physician’s Professional Obligations?Mark R. Wicclair - 2008 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 29 (3):171--185.
    In response to physicians who refuse to provide medical services that are contrary to their ethical and/or religious beliefs, it is sometimes asserted that anyone who is not willing to provide legally and professionally permitted medical services should choose another profession. This article critically examines the underlying assumption that conscientious objection is incompatible with a physician’s professional obligations (the “incompatibility thesis”). Several accounts of the professional obligations of physicians are explored: general ethical theories (consequentialism, contractarianism, and rights-based theories), (...)
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  19. Business and Marketing Ethics as Professional Ethics. Concepts, Approaches and Typologies.Johannes Brinkmann - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 41 (1-2):159 - 177.
    Marketing ethics is normally marketed as a sub-specialization of business ethics. In this paper, marketing ethics serves as an umbrella term for advertising, PR and sales ethics and as an example of professional ethics. To structure the paper, four approaches are distinguished, with a focus on typical professional conflicts, codes, roles or climates respectively. Since the moral climate approachis more inclusive than the other approaches, the last part of the paper deals mainly with moral climates, within the above-mentioned (...)
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  20.  43
    The Professional Status of Bioethics Consultation.Deborah Cummins - 2002 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (1):19-43.
    Is bioethics consultation a profession? Withfew exceptions, the arguments andcounterarguments about whether healthcareethics consultation is a profession haveignored the historical and cultural developmentof professions in the United States, the wayssocial changes have altered the work andboundaries of all professions, and theprofessionalization theories that explain howmodern societies institutionalize expertise inprofessions. This interdisciplinary analysisbegins to fill this gap by framing the debatewithin a larger theoretical context heretoforemissing from the bioethics literature. Specifically, the question of whether ethicsconsultation is a profession is examined fromthe (...)
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  21.  72
    Professional Identity and Organisation in a Technical Occupation: The Emergence of Chemical Engineering in Britain, C . 1915–30.Colin Divall, James F. Donnelly & Sean F. Johnston - 1999 - Contemporary British History 13:56-81.
    The emergence in Britain of chemical engineering, by mid‐century the fourth largest engineering specialism, was a hesitant and drawn out process. This article analyses the organisational politics behind the recognition of the technical occupation and profession from the First World War through to the end of the 1920s. The collective sense of professional identity among nascent ‘chemical engineers’ developed rapidly during this time owing to associations which promoted their cause among potential patrons. -/- .
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  22. Euthanasia, Assisted Suicide and the Professional Obligations of Physicians.Lucie White - 2010 - Emergent Australasian Philosophers 3:1-15.
    Euthanasia and assisted suicide have proved to be very contentious topics in medical ethics. Some ethicists are particularly concerned that allowing physicians to carry out these procedures will undermine their professional obligations and threaten the very goals of medicine. However, I maintain that the fundamental goals of medicine not only do not preclude the practice of euthanasia and assisted suicide by physicians, but can in fact be seen to support these practices in some instances. I look at two influential (...)
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  23. Professional Ethics and Civic Morals.Emile Durkheim - 1957 - Routledge.
    In Professional Ethics and Civic Morals , Emile Durkheim outlined the core of his theory of morality and social rights which was to dominate his work throughout the course of his life. In Durkheim's view, sociology is a science of morals which are objective social facts, and these moral regulations form the basis of individual rights and obligations. This book is crucial to an understanding of Durkheim's sociology because it contains his much-neglected theory of the state as a moral (...)
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  24.  51
    Professional Autonomy and the Normative Structure of Medical Practice.Jan Hoogland & Henk Jochemsen - 2000 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 21 (5):457-475.
    Professional autonomy is often described as a claim of professionalsthat has to serve primarily their own interests. However, it can also beseen as an element of a professional ideal that can function as astandard for professional, i.e. medical practice. This normativeunderstanding of the medical profession and professional autonomy facesthree threats today. 1) Internal erosion of professional autonomy due toa lack of internal quality control by the medical profession; 2)the increasing upward pressure on health care expenses (...)
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  25.  93
    Whistleblowing and Professional Responsibility.Sissela Bok - 1980 - New York University Education Quarterly 11 (4):2-10.
    Individuals who would blow the whistle by making public disclosure of impropriety in their own organizations face choices of public v private good. These dilemmas, along with institutional and professional standards that might ease the way of whistleblowers, are explored.
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  26.  37
    Professional Identity Formation in Medical Education: The Convergence of Multiple Domains. [REVIEW]Mark Holden, Era Buck, Mark Clark, Karen Szauter & Julie Trumble - 2012 - HEC Forum 24 (4):245-255.
    There has been increasing emphasis on professionalism in medical education over the past several decades, initially focusing on bioethical principles, communication skills, and behaviors of medical students and practitioners. Authors have begun to discuss professional identity formation (PIF), distinguishing it as the foundational process one experiences during the transformation from lay person to physician. This integrative developmental process involves the establishment of core values, moral principles, and self-awareness. The literature has approached PIF from various paradigms—professionalism, psychological ego development, social (...)
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  27.  96
    Learning Professional Ways of Being: Ambiguities of Becoming.Gloria Dall’Alba - 2009 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 41 (1):34-45.
    The purpose of professional education programs is to prepare aspiring professionals for the challenges of practice within a particular profession. These programs typically seek to ensure the acquisition of necessary knowledge and skills, as well as providing opportunities for their application. While not denying the importance of knowledge and skills, this paper reconfigures professional education as a process of becoming. Learning to become a professional involves not only what we know and can do, but also who we (...)
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  28.  41
    Contextualising Professional Ethics: The Impact of the Prison Context on the Practices and Norms of Health Care Practitioners.Karolyn L. A. White, Christopher F. C. Jordens & Ian Kerridge - 2014 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (3):333-345.
    Health care is provided in many contexts—not just hospitals, clinics, and community health settings. Different institutional settings may significantly influence the design and delivery of health care and the ethical obligations and practices of health care practitioners working within them. This is particularly true in institutions that are established to constrain freedom, ensure security and authority, and restrict movement and choice. We describe the results of a qualitative study of the experiences of doctors and nurses working within two women’s prisons (...)
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  29.  22
    Strategies for Teaching Professional Ethics to IT Engineering Degree Students and Evaluating the Result.Rafael Miñano, Ángel Uruburu, Ana Moreno-Romero & Diego Pérez-López - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (1):263-286.
    This paper presents an experience in developing professional ethics by an approach that integrates knowledge, teaching methodologies and assessment coherently. It has been implemented for students in both the Software Engineering and Computer Engineering degree programs of the Technical University of Madrid, in which professional ethics is studied as a part of a required course. Our contribution of this paper is a model for formative assessment that clarifies the learning goals, enhances the results, simplifies the scoring and can (...)
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  30.  52
    Professional Values and Nursing.Derek Sellman - 2011 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (2):203-208.
    The values of nursing arise from a concern with human flourishing. If the desire to become a nurse is a reflection of an aspiration to care for others in need then we should anticipate that those who choose to nurse have a tendency towards the values we would normally associate with a caring profession (care, compassion, perhaps altruism, and so on). However, these values require a secure base if they are not to succumb to the corrupting pressures of the increasingly (...)
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  31.  41
    A Cross-Country Comparison of the Codes of Professional Conduct of Certified/Chartered Accountants.S. T. Jakubowski, P. Chao, S. K. Huh & S. Maheshwari - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 35 (2):111 - 129.
    This research examines the extent to which similarities and differences exist in the codes of professional conduct of certified (chartered) accountants across the following countries: the United States, Taiwan, South Korea, Malaysia, Ontario (Canada), Australia, India, and Hong Kong. These eight countries exemplify some of the diversity in economic, political, legal, and cultural environments in which public accountants practice. The professional codes of ethics establish the ethical boundary parameters within which professional accountants must operate and they are (...)
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  32.  91
    Learning and Teaching in Uncertain Times: A Nietzschean Approach in Professional Higher Education.Henriëtta Joosten - 2013 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 47 (4):548-563.
    Today professionals have to deal with more uncertainties in their field than before. We live in complex and rapidly changing environments. The British philosopher Ronald Barnett adds the term ‘supercomplexity’ to highlight the fact that ‘we can no longer be sure how even to describe the world that faces us’ (Barnett, 2004). Uncertainty is, nevertheless, not a highly appreciated notion. An obvious response to uncertainty is to reduce it—or even better, to wipe it away. The assumption of this approach is (...)
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  33. Professional Ethics, Media and Good Governance.Desh Raj Sirswal - 2013 - Intellection (01):Jan-June 2013.
    Philosophy is a vast subject and it is growing day by day in many branches although it has many traditional branches like epistemology, metaphysics, ethics and logic etc. Professional ethics is a discipline of philosophy and a part of subject called as ETHICS. In professional ethics we study the morals and code of conduct to be used while one practices in his/her profession. Media is also a profession and there is also a code of conduct to this profession (...)
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  34.  20
    Professional Hubris and its Consequences: Why Organizations of Health‐Care Professions Should Not Adopt Ethically Controversial Positions.Eric Vogelstein - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (4):234-243.
    In this article, I argue that professional healthcare organizations such as the AMA and ANA ought not to take controversial stances on professional ethics. I address the best putative arguments in favor of taking such stances, and argue that none are convincing. I then argue that the sort of stance-taking at issue has pernicious consequences: it stands to curb critical thought in social, political, and legal debates, increase moral distress among clinicians, and alienate clinicians from their professional (...)
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  35.  40
    How Should We Foster the Professional Integrity of Engineers in Japan? A Pride-Based Approach.Tetsuji Iseda - 2008 - Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (2):165-176.
    I discuss the predicament that engineering-ethics education in Japan now faces and propose a solution to this. The predicament is professional motivation, i.e., the problem of how to motivate engineering students to maintain their professional integrity. The special professional responsibilities of engineers are often explained either as an implicit social contract between the profession and society (the “social-contract” view), or as requirements for membership in the profession (the “membership-requirement” view). However, there are empirical data that suggest that (...)
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  36.  31
    Ethical Exemplification and the AICPA Code of Professional Conduct: An Empirical Investigation of Auditor and Public Perceptions.Phil A. Brown, Morris H. Stocks & W. Mark Wilder - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 71 (1):39-71.
    This research applies the impression management theory of exemplification in an accounting study by identifying and measuring differences in both auditor and public perceptions of exemplary behaviors. The auditors were divided into two groups, one of which reported self-perceptions (A-S) while the other group reported their perceptions of a typical auditor (A-O). There were two separate public groups, which gave their perceptions of a typical auditor and were divided based on their levels of accounting sophistication. The more sophisticated public group (...)
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  37.  18
    Professional Talk: How Middle Managers Frame Care Workers as Professionals.Lieke Oldenhof, Annemiek Stoopendaal & Kim Putters - 2016 - Health Care Analysis 24 (1):47-70.
    This paper examines how middle managers in the long term care sector use the discourse of professionalism to create ‘appropriate’ work conduct of care workers. Using Watson’s concept of professional talk, we study how managers in their daily work talk about professionalism of vocationally skilled care workers. Based on observations and recordings of mundane conversations by middle managers, we found four different professional talks that co-exist: appropriate looks and conduct, reflectivity about personal values and ‘good’ care, methodical work (...)
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  38. Informatics and Professional Responsibility.Donald Gotterbarn - 2001 - Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (2):221-230.
    Many problems in software development can be traced to a narrow understanding of professional responsibility. The author examines ways in which software developers have tried to avoid accepting responsibility for their work. After cataloguing various types of responsibility avoidance, the author introduces an expanded concept of positive responsibility. It is argued that the adoption of this sense of positive responsibility will reduce many problems in software development.
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  39. Pedagogies of Reflection: Dialogical Professional-Development Schools in Israel.Arie Kizel - 2014 - Advances in Research on Teaching 22:113 – 136.
    This chapter discusses a form of pedagogy of reflection suggested to be defined as the dialogical-reflective professional-development school (DRPDS)  a framework that develops and empowers students by engaging them in a process of continual improvement, responding to diverse situations, providing stimuli for learning, and giving anchors for mediation. The pedagogy of reflection relates to dialogue not only from a theoretical historical context but also by way of example  that is, it offers empowering dialogues within the traditional teacher-training (...)
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  40.  44
    The Authority of Professional Roles.Andreas Eriksen - 2015 - Journal of Social Philosophy 46 (3):373-391.
    Are professional roles bound by the norms of ordinary morality? This article begins with a discussion of two existing models that give contrary answers to this question; the practice model detaches professional ethics from ordinary morality, while the translation model denies any real divergence. It is argued that neither model can give a satisfying account of how professional roles ground distinct claims that are morally authoritative. The promise model is articulated and defended, wherein the obligations of (...) roles are grounded in an act of self-binding by the profession; the public is the promisee, and thereby entitled to make role-dependent claims. This model retains a connection to ordinary morality, but does not reduce role authority to individual conscience. Legitimate promises bind the role holder even in the face of moral disagreement. (shrink)
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  41.  22
    Just a Job?: Communication, Ethics, and Professional Life.George Cheney (ed.) - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    (Re)framing ethics at work -- Starting conversations about professional ethics -- Working for a good life -- Being a professional : problems and promises -- Reconsidering organizations as cultures of integrity -- Seeking something more in the market -- Finding new ways to talk about everyday ethics.
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  42. The Politics of Professional Ethics.Bob Brecher - 2010 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (2):351-355.
    In order to illustrate how terms of reference themselves, such as those announced by ‘professional ethics’, delimit and distort moral consideration I start with an extended discussion of how Just War Theory operates to do this; and go on to discuss ‘the power of naming’ with reference to the British attack on Iraq. Having thus situated my approach to the politics of professional ethics in a broader political context I offer a critique of ‘professional’ ethics in terms (...)
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  43.  74
    Emotional Engagement in Professional Ethics.W. Scott Dunbar - 2005 - Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (4):535-551.
    Recent results from two different studies show evidence of strong emotional engagement in moral dilemmas that require personal involvement or ethical problems that involve significant inter-personal issues. This empirical evidence for a connection between emotional engagement and moral or ethical choices is interesting because it is related to a fundamental survival mechanism rooted in human evolution. The results lead one to question when and how emotional engagement might occur in a professional ethical situation. However, the studies employed static dilemmas (...)
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  44.  25
    The Role of Professional Knowledge in Case-Based Reasoning in Practical Ethics.Rosa Lynn Pinkus, Claire Gloeckner & Angela Fortunato - 2015 - Science and Engineering Ethics 21 (3):767-787.
    The use of case-based reasoning in teaching professional ethics has come of age. The fields of medicine, engineering, and business all have incorporated ethics case studies into leading textbooks and journal articles, as well as undergraduate and graduate professional ethics courses. The most recent guidelines from the National Institutes of Health recognize case studies and face-to-face discussion as best practices to be included in training programs for the Responsible Conduct of Research. While there is a general consensus that (...)
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  45.  12
    Effects of Earnings Forecasts and Heightened Professional Skepticism on the Outcomes of Client–Auditor Negotiation.Helen L. Brown-Liburd, Jeffrey Cohen & Greg Trompeter - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 116 (2):311-325.
    Ethics has been identified as an important factor that potentially affects auditors’ professional skepticism. For example, prior research finds that auditors who are more concerned with professional ethics exhibit greater professional skepticism. Further, the literature suggests that professional skepticism may lead the auditor to more vigilantly resist the client’s position in financial reporting disputes. These reporting disputes are generally resolved through negotiations between the auditor and client to arrive at the final reported amounts. To date, the (...)
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  46.  23
    Corruption or Professional Dignity: An Ethical Examination of the Phenomenon of “Red Envelopes” in Medical Practice in China.Wei Zhu, Lijie Wang & Chengshang Yang - 2018 - Developing World Bioethics 18 (1):37-44.
    In the medical practice in China, giving and taking “red envelopes” is a common phenomenon although few openly admit it. This paper, based on our empirical study including data collected from interviews and questionnaires with medical professionals and patients, attempts to explore why “red envelopes” have become a serious problem in the physician-patient relationship and how the situation can be improved. Previous studies show that scholars tend to correlate the spread of “red envelopes” in health care sector to the commercialization (...)
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  47.  56
    Professional Responsibility: Just Following the Rules?Michael Davis - 1999 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 18 (1):65-87.
  48.  39
    Management Educators' Expectations for Professional Ethics Development.Joseph A. Petrick & Robert F. Scherer - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 61 (4):301 - 314.
    Professional associations, like the Academy of Management, exist to foster and promote scholarship, exchange among faculty, and an environment conducive to member professional ethics development. However, this last purpose of such organizations has received the least amount of attention. Moreover, previous research has demonstrated that there are differences in perceived needs for professional ethics development between tenured and untenured faculty. In the current research 260 Academy of Management members were surveyed. The research identified differences between tenured and (...)
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  49.  14
    Gadamerian Dialogue in the Patient-Professional Interaction.Vilhjálmur Árnason - 2000 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 3 (1):17-23.
    In his seminal work, Truth and Method, theGerman philosopher Hans-Georg Gadamer distinguishesbetween three types of what he calls the experience ofthe `Thou'. In this paper, Gadamer's analysis of thisexperience is explained in terms of his philosophicalhermeneutics and brought to bear upon thepatient-professional relationship. It is argued thatwhile Gadamer's analysis implies fruitful insights fora dialogical account of the patient-professionalinteraction, it harbours elements which are conduciveto paternalistic practice of medicine. The strongattribution of value to tradition and the respect forauthority emphasized in (...)
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  50. Ethical Issues in Professional Life.Joan C. Callahan (ed.) - 1988 - Oxford University Press.
    When (if ever) may a professional deceive a client for the client's own good? Under what conditions (if any) is whistle-blowing morally required? These are just some of the questions that scholars as diverse as Michael D. Bayles, Thomas Nagel, Sissela Bok, Jessica Mitford, and Peter A. French confront in this stimulating anthology. Organized around philosophical issues such as the moral foundations of professional ethics, models of the professional-client relationship, deception, informed consent, privacy and confidentiality, professional (...)
     
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