Results for 'Architecture'

1000+ found
Order:
See also
  1. Modern Versus Postmodern Architecture.David Kolb - 1990 - In Postmodern Sphistications: Philosophy, Architecture, and Tradition. Chicago: University of Chicago press. pp. 87 – 105.
    A discussion of "postmodern" architecture in the sense in which the term was used in the late 1980s, namely, the introduction of historical substantive content and reference into architecture, disrupting the supposedly ahistorical purity of modernist architecture. Argues that postmodern use of history is really another version of the modern distance from history.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  56
    The Ethical Criticism of Architecture: In Defense of Moderate Moralism.Christoph Baumberger - 2015 - Architecture Philosophy 1 (2):179-197.
    Abstract: The practice of architectural criticism is supercharged with ethical evaluations. But do they have any bearing on the architectural value of a building? And how are the ethical value of an architectural work and its aesthetic value related? I defend the following answers, which define a version of moderate moralism with respect to architecture: An architectural work will in some cases be (1) architecturally flawed (or meritorious) due to the fact that it has ethical flaws (or merits), (2) (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3. Vacant NL, Where Architecture Meets Ideas: Curatorial Statement 12th Venice Architecture Biennale.Ronald Rietveld & Erik Rietveld - 2010 - In Jurgen Bey, Joost Grootens, Erik Rietveld, Ronald Rietveld, Saskia Van Stein & Barbara Visser (eds.), Vacant NL, Where Architecture Meets Ideas. NAI.
    For the Venice Architecture Biennale 2010, curator Rietveld Landscape has been invited by the Netherlands Architecture Institute (NAI) to make a statement about the potential of landscape architecture to contribute to resolving the complex challenges that our society faces today. These challenges call for innovation; for a culture centred on design skills and cooperation between scientists and creative pioneers. The installation ‘Vacant NL, where architecture meets ideas’ calls upon the Dutch government to make use of the (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Spatiality, Temporality and Architecture as the Place of Memory.David Morris - 2016 - In Patricia M. Locke & Rachel McCann (eds.), Merleau-Ponty: Space, Place, Architecture. Athens, OH 45701, USA: pp. 109-126.
    The chapter’s central question is how place and memory connect so intimately and how the architecture of buildings and rooms can play such a powerful role in memory. I develop an initial answer in two steps. First, I explicate Merleau-Ponty’s argument in the passivity lectures (IP ) that, contra classical concepts of memory as purely passive recording or purely active construction, memory entails a peculiar passivity that is not, however, wholly passive. Merleau-Ponty’s argument entails some deep conceptual points about (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. The Cognitive Architecture of Imaginative Resistance.Kengo Miyazono & Shen-yi Liao - 2016 - In Amy Kind (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Imagination. pp. 233-246.
    Where is imagination in imaginative resistance? We seek to answer this question by connecting two ongoing lines of inquiry in different subfields of philosophy. In philosophy of mind, philosophers have been trying to understand imaginative attitudes’ place in cognitive architecture. In aesthetics, philosophers have been trying to understand the phenomenon of imaginative resistance. By connecting these two lines of inquiry, we hope to find mutual illumination of an attitude (or cluster of attitudes) and a phenomenon that have vexed philosophers. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  6. To the Center of the Sky: Heidegger, Polar Symbolism, and Christian Sacred Architecture.William Behun - 2009 - Environment, Space, Place 1 (1):7-25.
    Heidegger’s sense of the holy is an important aspect of his thought, especially in the form that it takes in his later work. By juxtaposingHeidegger’s thinking on the sacred with traditional metaphysician René Guénon’s examination of the symbolism of the sacred pole, we can bring both elements into clearer focus. This paper undertakes to draw together these two radically disparate thinkers not to undermine either’s project, but rather to demonstrate one way in which the sacred can be more thoroughly understood, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Architecture and the Global Ecological Crisis: From Heidegger to Christopher Alexander.Arran Gare - 2003/2004 - The Structurist 43:30-37.
    This paper argues that while Heidegger showed the importance of architecture in altering people's modes of being to avoid global ecological destruction, the work of Christopher Alexander offered a far more practical orientation to deal with this problem.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Hegel's Architecture.David Kolb - 2007 - In Stephen Houlgate (ed.), Hegel and the Arts. Northwestern University Press.
    "The first of the particular arts . . . is architecture." (A 13.116/1.83)1 For Hegel, architecture stands at several beginnings. It is the art closest to raw nature. It is the beginning art in a progressive spiritualization that will culminate in poetry and music. The drive for art is spirit's drive to become fully itself by encountering itself; art makes spirit's essential reality present as an outer sensible work of its own powers.2 (A 13.453/1.351) If Hegel's narrative of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Phenomenological Architecture of a Mind and Operational Architectonics of the Brain: The Unified Metastable Continuum.Andrew A. Fingelkurts, Alexander A. Fingelkurts & Carlos F. H. Neves - 2009 - In Robert Kozma & John Caulfield (eds.), Journal of New Mathematics and Natural Computing. Special Issue on Neurodynamic Correlates of Higher Cognition and Consciousness: Theoretical and Experimental Approaches - in Honor of Walter J Freeman's 80th Birthday. World Scientific. pp. 221-244.
    In our contribution we will observe phenomenal architecture of a mind and operational architectonics of the brain and will show their intimate connectedness within a single integrated metastable continuum. The notion of operation of different complexity is the fundamental and central one in bridging the gap between brain and mind: it is precisely by means of this notion that it is possible to identify what at the same time belongs to the phenomenal conscious level and to the neurophysiological level (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  10. An Autonomist View on the Ethical Criticism of Architecture.Ricardo Miguel - 2016 - Philosophy@Lisbon (5):131-141.
    It is a fact that there is ethical criticism about art. Art critics, the general public and even artists point out moral flaws in artworks while evaluating them. Philosophers, however, have maintained a hot debate on the meaning of such criticism. This debate can be understood as a disagreement about the kind of relation between the artistic value of artworks and their alleged moral value. While some claim that moral value can contribute to artistic value (moralism), others claim that there (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Philosophy of Architecture.Saul Fisher - 2015 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Central issues in philosophy of architecture include foundational matters regarding the nature of: (1) architecture as an artform, design medium, or other product or practice; (2) architectural objects—what sorts of things they are; how they differ from other sorts of objects; and how we define the range of such objects; (3) special architectural properties, like the standard trio of structural integrity (firmitas), beauty, and utility—or space, light, and form; and ways they might be special to architecture; (4) (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  12. The Architect's Brain: Neuroscience, Creativity, and Architecture.Harry Francis Mallgrave - 2010 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    Introduction -- Historical essays -- The humanist brain : Alberti, Vitruvius, and Leonardo -- The enlightened brain : Perrault, Laugier, and Le Roy -- The sensational brain : Burke, Price, and Knight -- The transcendental brain : Kant and Schopenhauer -- The animate brain : Schinkel, Bötticher, and Semper -- The empathetic brain : Vischer, Wölfflin, and Göller -- The gestalt brain : the dynamics of the sensory field -- The neurological brain : Hayek, Hebb, and Neutra -- The phenomenal (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  13. Scientific Inference and Ordinary Cognition: Fodor on Holism and Cognitive Architecture.Tim Fuller & Richard Samuels - 2014 - Mind and Language 29 (2):201-237.
    Do accounts of scientific theory formation and revision have implications for theories of everyday cognition? We maintain that failing to distinguish between importantly different types of theories of scientific inference has led to fundamental misunderstandings of the relationship between science and everyday cognition. In this article, we focus on one influential manifestation of this phenomenon which is found in Fodor's well-known critique of theories of cognitive architecture. We argue that in developing his critique, Fodor confounds a variety of distinct (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  14.  96
    Unconscious Representations 2: Towards an Integrated Cognitive Architecture.Luis M. Augusto - 2014 - Axiomathes 24 (1):19-43.
    The representational nature of human cognition and thought in general has been a source of controversies. This is particularly so in the context of studies of unconscious cognition, in which representations tend to be ontologically and structurally segregated with regard to their conscious status. However, it appears evolutionarily and developmentally unwarranted to posit such segregations, as,otherwise, artifact structures and ontologies must be concocted to explain them from the viewpoint of the human cognitive architecture. Here, from a by-and-large Classical cognitivist (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  15. Modularity and Mental Architecture.Philip Robbins - 2013 - WIREs Cognitive Science 4 (6):641-648.
    Debates about the modularity of cognitive architecture have been ongoing for at least the past three decades, since the publication of Fodor’s landmark book The Modularity of Mind (1983). According to Fodor, modularity is essentially tied to informational encapsulation, and as such is only found in the relatively low-level cognitive systems responsible for perception and language. According to Fodor’s critics in the evolutionary psychology camp, modularity simply reflects the fine-grained functional specialization dictated by natural selection, and it characterizes virtually (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  16. Pure Visuality: Notes on Intellection & Form in Art & Architecture.Gavin Keeney - manuscript
    Diaristic, mixed notes on: John Ruskin's The Poetry of Architecture (1837) and Modern Painters (1885); Caravaggio, Victorian Aesthetes, G.K. Chesterton, and Tacita Dean; Jay Fellows' Ruskin’s Maze: Mastery and Madness in His Art (1981); Slavoj Žižek at Jack Tilton Gallery, New York, New York, USA, April 23, 2009, “Architectural Parallax: Spandrels and Other Phenomena of Class Struggle”; “Titian, Tintoretto, Veronese: Rivals in Renaissance Venice”, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, March 15-August 16, 2009; Janet Harbord, Chris Marker: La (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Does the Sustainability Movement Sustain a Sustainable Design Ethic for Architecture?Tom Spector - 2006 - Environmental Ethics 28 (3):265-283.
    The sustainability movement, currently gathering considerable attention from architects, derives much of its moral foundation from the theoretical initiatives of environmental ethics. How is the value of sustainability to mesh with architecture’s time-tested values? The idea that an ethic of sustainability might serve architects’ efforts to reground their practices in something that opposes consumer values of the marketplace has intuitive appeal and makes a certain amount of sense. However, it is far from obvious that the sustainability movement provides a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18.  16
    William Whewell’s Philosophy of Architecture and the Historicization of Biology.Aleta Quinn - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 1 (59):11-19.
    William Whewell’s work on historical science has received some attention from historians and philosophers of science. Whewell’s own work on the history of German Gothic church architecture has been touched on within the context of the history of architecture. To a large extent these discussions have been conducted separately. I argue that Whewell intended his work on Gothic architecture as an attempt to (help) found a science of historical architecture, as an exemplar of historical science. I (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  19.  49
    Niche Construction Theory and Human Architecture.John Odling-Smee & J. Scott Turner - 2011 - Biological Theory 6 (3):283-289.
    In modern evolutionary theory, selection acts on particular genes and assemblages of genes that operate through phenotypes expressed in environments. This view, however, overlooks the fact that organisms often alter their environments in pursuit of fitness needs and thus modify some environmental selection pressures. Niche construction theory introduces a reciprocal causal process that modifies natural selection relative to three general kinds of environmental components: abiota, biota, and artifacts. The ways in which niche-constructing organisms can construct or modify the components differ. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  20.  47
    The Design of the Internet’s Architecture by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) and Human Rights.Corinne Cath & Luciano Floridi - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (2):449-468.
    The debate on whether and how the Internet can protect and foster human rights has become a defining issue of our time. This debate often focuses on Internet governance from a regulatory perspective, underestimating the influence and power of the governance of the Internet’s architecture. The technical decisions made by Internet Standard Developing Organisations that build and maintain the technical infrastructure of the Internet influences how information flows. They rearrange the shape of the technically mediated public sphere, including which (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  21. Cognition Without Classical Architecture.James W. Garson - 1994 - Synthese 100 (2):291-306.
    Fodor and Pylyshyn (1988) argue that any successful model of cognition must use classical architecture; it must depend upon rule-based processing sensitive to constituent structure. This claim is central to their defense of classical AI against the recent enthusiasm for connectionism. Connectionist nets, they contend, may serve as theories of the implementation of cognition, but never as proper theories of psychology. Connectionist models are doomed to describing the brain at the wrong level, leaving the classical view to account for (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  22. On Architecture as a Spatial Art.Andrea Sauchelli - 2012 - Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 23 (43):53-64.
    I present and evaluate various criticisms against the view that architecture and architectural value are to be understood solely in terms of internal space. I conclude that the architectural value of a building should not be limited to its internal spatial effects because the value of other elements, such as (non-spatial) function, materials, ornamentation, and so on cannot all be reduced to spatial values.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  48
    A Two-Tiered Cognitive Architecture for Moral Reasoning.John Bolender - 2001 - Biology and Philosophy 16 (3):339-356.
    The view that moral cognition is subserved by a two-tieredarchitecture is defended: Moral reasoning is the result both ofspecialized, informationally encapsulated modules which automaticallyand effortlessly generate intuitions; and of general-purpose,cognitively penetrable mechanisms which enable moral judgment in thelight of the agent's general fund of knowledge. This view is contrastedwith rival architectures of social/moral cognition, such as Cosmidesand Tooby's view that the mind is wholly modular, and it is argued thata two-tiered architecture is more plausible.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  24.  74
    Architecture and Technology: A Discontinuous Relation. [REVIEW]Andrew Benjamin - 2013 - Foundations of Science 18 (1):201-204.
    Technology has a history structured by discontinuities. The first important philosophical expression of such a conception of technology was advanced by Walter Benjamin when he defined art works in relation to specific techniques of production. At the present art and architecture occur within an age defined by the move from ’technical reproducibility’ to digital reproducibility. The move has an impact on how technology is understood and its relation to architecture conceived. Adapting Walter Benjamin’s work in this area provides (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25.  60
    Ambiguity in Architecture.Christoph Baumberger - 2009 - In G. Ernst, O. Scholz & J. Steinbrenner (eds.), Nelson Goodman: From Logic to Art. Ontos. pp. 293--319.
    Buildings are frequently described as ambiguous and, indeed, they often involve the ambivalence associated with ambiguous symbols. In this paper, I develop a theory of architectural ambiguity within the framework of a Goodmanian symbol theory. Based upon Israel Scheffler’s study of verbal and pictorial ambiguity, I present a theory of denotational ambiguity of buildings which distinguishes four types of ambiguity: elementary ambiguity, interpretation-ambiguity, multiple meaning and metaphor, which proves to be a special case of multiple meaning. Denotationally ambiguous buildings are (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  26.  12
    Theatre of Deferral: The Image of the Law and the Architecture of the Inns of Court.David Evans - 1999 - Law and Critique 10 (1):1-25.
    This article addresses the architecture of the Inns of Court, the home of the Common Law. The approach taken, however, rejects an approach that would reduce the Inns to a roster of historical details and laudatory description. Instead, the Inns are seen, if not actually felt, as the embodiment of the “original” ground of law. This experience is revealed through a three-stage discovery process that situates the Inns within the medieval context of symbol and ritual as informed by Turner’s (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  27.  67
    Mindreading: Mental State Ascription and Cognitive Architecture.Joseph L. H. Cruz - 1998 - Mind and Language 13 (3):323-340.
    The debate between the theory-theory and simulation has largely ignored issues of cognitive architecture. In the philosophy of psychology, cognition as symbol manipulation is the orthodoxy. The challenge from connectionism, however, has attracted vigorous and renewed interest. In this paper I adopt connectionism as the antecedent of a conditional: If connectionism is the correct account of cognitive architecture, then the simulation theory should be preferred over the theory-theory. I use both developmental evidence and constraints on explanation in psychology (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  28. Propositional Glue and the Projection Architecture of LFG.Avery D. Andrews - 2010 - Linguistics and Philosophy 33 (3):141-170.
    Although ‘glue semantics’ is the most extensively developed theory of semantic composition for LFG, it is not very well integrated into the LFG projection architecture, due to the absence of a simple and well-explained correspondence between glue-proofs and f-structures. In this paper I will show that we can improve this situation with two steps: (1) Replace the current quantificational formulations of glue (either Girard’s system F, or first order linear logic) with strictly propositional linear logic (the quantifier, unit and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  58
    Monsters of Architecture: Anthropomorphism in Architectural Theory.Edward Winters & Marco Frascari - 1993 - Philosophical Quarterly 43 (171):251.
    '...deserves serious attention among new theories in architecture, and is recommended for all university architectural collections.'|s CHOICE.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  30.  93
    Institutional Design and Public Space: Hegel, Architecture, and Democracy.J. C. Berendzen - 2008 - Journal of Social Philosophy 39 (2):291-307.
    Habermas's conception of deliberative democracy could be fruitfully supplemented with a discussion of the "institutional design" of civil society; for example the architecture of public spaces should be considered. This paper argues that Hegel's discussion of architecture in his 'Aesthetics' can speak to this issue. For Hegel, architecture culminates in the gothic cathedral, because of how it fosters reflection on the part of the worshiper. This discussion suggests the possibility that architecture could foster a similar kind (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  24
    Technology Characteristics, Choice Architecture, and Farmer Knowledge: The Case of Phytase.Michael Stahlman & Laura Mj Mccann - 2012 - Agriculture and Human Values 29 (3):371-379.
    Phytase is an enzyme that frees the phosphorus bound in feed grains and thus reduces the amount of dicalcium phosphate supplementation required for non-ruminants, reducing phosphorous excretion and thus reducing water pollution. This innovation has been widely adopted by feed companies in the US due to decreased phytase production costs and increased dicalcium phosphate costs. The roles played by phytase characteristics and choice architecture in the widespread use of this win–win technology are examined. A recent survey has also revealed (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32.  40
    Public Exposure: Architecture and Interpretation.David Kolb - 2008 - Wolkenkuckucksheim - Cloud-Cuckoo-Land - Vozdushnyizamok.
    How the interpretation of architecture differs from that of other artworks.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33.  52
    Connectionism and Novel Combinations of Skills: Implications for Cognitive Architecture[REVIEW]Robert F. Hadley - 1999 - Minds and Machines 9 (2):197-221.
    In the late 1980s, there were many who heralded the emergence of connectionism as a new paradigm – one which would eventually displace the classically symbolic methods then dominant in AI and Cognitive Science. At present, there remain influential connectionists who continue to defend connectionism as a more realistic paradigm for modeling cognition, at all levels of abstraction, than the classical methods of AI. Not infrequently, one encounters arguments along these lines: given what we know about neurophysiology, it is just (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  34.  57
    Ten Short Theses on Architecture as Art.Gavin Keeney - manuscript
    Drops Dripped - WKCD - What Does It Do? - Techne - Faux Year Zero - Commercium as Ethics - Fictitious Space - The Module - The Image - Art, Love, Revolution. A version of this essay appeared in Gavin Keeney, "Else-where": Essays in Art, Architecture, and Cultural Production 2002-2011 (CSP, 2011), pp. 285-306.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  53
    Philosophy and Architecture.Michael H. Mitias (ed.) - 1994 - Rodopi.
    Contents: PART I: AESTHETICS OF ARCHITECTURE: QUESTIONS. Francis SPARSHOTT: The Aesthetics of Architecture and the Politics of Space. Arnold BERLEANT: Architecture and the Aesthetics of Continuity. Stephen DAVIES: Is Architecture Art? PART II: NATURE OF ARCHITECTURE. B.R. TILGHMAN: Architecture, Expression, and the Understanding of a Culture. David NOVITZ: Architectural Brilliance and the Constraints of Time. Michael H. MITIAS: Expression in Architecture. Ralf WEBER: The Myth of Meaningful Forms. Michael H. MITIAS: Is Meaning in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  36.  5
    When is Architecture Not Design?Saul Fisher - 2019 - Laocoonte: Revista de Estética y Teoría de Las Artes 1 (6):183-198.
    If there is nothing more to architecture than design –and to its attendant thinking processes–than design thinking, then core dimensions of the architectural enterprise from the perspective of (a) production and (b) use have no special character, over and above their counterparts in general design. Yet that does not appear to be true by the lights of architects or design specialists or the public at large. So what is it, at the core or periphery of the discipline or its (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. The Singular Objects of Architecture.Jean Baudrillard - 2005 - Univ of Minnesota Press.
    What is a singular object? An idea, a building, a color, a sentiment, a human being. Each in turn comes under scrutiny in this exhilarating dialogue between two of the most interesting thinkers working in philosophy and architecture today. From such singular objects, Jean Baudrillard and Jean Nouvel move on to fundamental problems of politics, identity, and aesthetics as their exchange becomes an imaginative exploration of the possibilities of modern architecture and the future of modern life. Among the (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38.  56
    Communiquer l'Architecture Par le Média Exposition (with an Abstract in English).Marie Élizabeth Laberge - 2012 - Mediatropes 3 (2):82-108.
    Aborder l’exposition comme média implique de considérer le point de vue du producteur (commissaire), celui du récepteur (visiteur) et celui de l’exposition (à travers les moyens employés et l’aspect de l’architecture communiqué). Deux manières d’envisager la communication de l’architecture au musée sont abordées. Pour la première, et selon nous la plus ancienne, le terme architecture est pris au sens de bâtiment. Les commissaires tentent alors de transmettre à la fois l’expérience et la matérialité du bâtiment. Pour la (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  55
    Understanding Sustainable Architecture: Terry Williamson, Antony Radford and Helen Bennetts. Spon Press, 2003. [REVIEW]Greg Bamford - 2005 - Architecture Australia 94 (5):50.
  40. The Cognitive Architecture of Embodied Mind.Helena Knyazeva - 2011 - International Journal of the Humanities 8 (12):1-10.
    The dynamic approach to understanding of the human consciousness, its cognitive activities and cognitive architecture is one of the most promising approaches in the modern epistemology and cognitive science. The conception of embodied mind is under discussion in the light of nonlinear dynamics and of the idea co-evolution of complex systems developed by the Moscow scientific school. The cognitive architecture of the embodied mind is rather complex: data from senses and products of rational thinking, the verbal and the (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41.  17
    LEGO® Formalism in Architecture.Saul Fisher - 2017 - In Roy T. Cook & Sondra Bacharach (eds.), Lego and Philosophy: Constructing Reality Brick by Brick. Oxford, UK: Blackwell Publishers. pp. 27-37.
    LEGO tells about not just LEGO architecture but architecture generally: its objects, its aesthetic properties, and how people judge them. To illustrate how thinking about LEGO can help people with such matters, this chapter considers some scenarios. These scenarios illustrate two very different ways of thinking about architecture. On the one hand, people might think architectural objects (more commonly, "works of architecture"), like buildings, bridges, and aqueducts, have forms that stand on their own, and which thereby (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  36
    Eco-Culture, Development, and Architecture.Chris Abel - 1993 - Knowledge and Policy 6 (3-4):10-28.
    This article examines the prospects for an authentic regional architecture in the light of alternative development paradigms. It is argued that the failure of orthodox development strategies and the domination of western culture, including architecture, over non-Western cultures, is due to fundamental imbalances between northern and southern economic structures. By contrast, ecodevelopment, appropriate technology and regional architecture all represent significant devolutionary movements toward a global “eco-culture.” A cultural typology placing eco-culture in historical perspective is outlined. It is (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  36
    Minor Houses/Minor Architecture.T. Hugh Crawford - 2010 - AI and Society 25 (4):379-385.
    Deleuze and Guattari develop a notion of “minor literature” in their short book on Kafka, and the opposition major/minor has been used with varying degrees of success by critics working in a range of disciplines including architectural theory. Teasing out the potentially subversive implications of the major/minor opposition requires reading it in relation to other binarisms developed by Deleuze and Guattari in those same years, e.g., state/nomadic science, striated/smooth space, optic/haptic, as well as Guattari’s useful concept “machinic heterogenesis.” Then, one (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Ontology of Construction: On Nihilism of Technology in Theories of Modern Architecture.Gevork Hartoonian - 1994 - Cambridge University Press.
    Ontology of Construction explores theories of construction in modern architecture, with a particular focus on the relationship between nihilism of technology and architecture. Providing an historical context to the concept of making, the essays collected in this volume articulate the implications of technology in works by such architects as Le Corbusier, Frank Lloyd Wright, Adolf Loos, and Mies van der Rohe. Also provided is an interpretation of Gottfried Semper's discourse on the Tectonic and the relationship between architecture (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45.  18
    Le Corbusier : architecture et politique.Labbé Mickaël - 2017 - Astérion. Philosophie, Histoire des Idées, Pensée Politique 16.
    Les rapports entretenus par Le Corbusier, architecte le plus emblématique de la modernité, avec le pouvoir politique sont foncièrement ambivalents. Promoteur inlassable du bonheur pour tous à travers l’architecture, Le Corbusier a pourtant frayé avec à peu près tous les pouvoirs, apparemment sans témoigner de préférences politiques, d’une manière qui semble contradictoire avec ses propres objectifs. À travers une série de paradoxes, nous cherchons à montrer que l’attitude politique de Le Corbusier ne doit pas simplement être référée à un (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  33
    Architecture by Design: Exhibiting Architecture Architecturally.Jennifer Carter - 2012 - Mediatropes 3 (2):28-51.
    Drawing on a series of exhibitions curated and installed at the Canadian Centre for Architecture in Montréal throughout the 1990s and the early millennium, this essay analyzes how architecture and its representation in museological exhibitions have innovated forms of communication and display practices, transcending the traditions established by the fine arts paradigm since the late eighteenth century. The author argues that in addition to providing a heightened recognition of the narrative and performative potential of the exhibitionary setting, the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  10
    Architecture Philosophy Vol. 3 No. 2.Tom Spector - 2018 - Architecture Philosophy 3 (2).
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  14
    Architecture Philosophy Vol. 3 No. 1.Tom Spector - 2018 - Architecture Philosophy 3 (1).
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  58
    Mind Architecture and Brain Architecture.Camilo J. Cela-Conde & Gisèle Marty - 1997 - Biology and Philosophy 12 (3):327-340.
    The use of the computer metaphor has led to the proposal of mind architecture (Pylyshyn 1984; Newell 1990) as a model of the organization of the mind. The dualist computational model, however, has, since the earliest days of psychological functionalism, required that the concepts mind architecture and brain architecture be remote from each other. The development of both connectionism and neurocomputational science, has sought to dispense with this dualism and provide general models of consciousness – a uniform (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  29
    What Can Social Psychologists Learn From Architecture? The Asylum as Example.Juliet L. H. Foster - 2014 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 44 (2):131-147.
    In this paper I argue for a stronger consideration of the possible relationship between social psychology and architecture and architectural history. After a brief review of some of the ways in which other social psychologists have sought to develop links between social psychology and history, I consider the utility of architecture in more depth, especially to the social psychologist interested in the development of knowledge and understanding. I argue that, especially when knowledge is institutionalised, the design and use (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1000