Results for 'Are Atheists'

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  1. Why (Almost All) Cosmologists Are Atheists.Sean Carroll - 2005 - Faith and Philosophy 22 (5):622-635.
    Science and religion both make claims about the fundamental workings of the universe. Although these claims are not a priori incompatible (we could imaginebeing brought to religious belief through scientific investigation), I will argue that in practice they diverge. If we believe that the methods of science can be used to discriminate between fundamental pictures of reality, we are led to a strictly materialist conception of the universe. While the details of modern cosmology are not a necessary part of this (...)
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  2. Are Atheists Really More Psychologically Disturbed Than Religionists.A. Ellis - 1993 - Free Inquiry 13 (3):18-19.
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  3.  10
    We Confess That We Are Atheists.Stephen Bullivant - 2020 - New Blackfriars 101 (1092):120-134.
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  4. 50 Voices of Disbelief: Why We Are Atheists.Michael Tooley - 2009 - Wiley-Blackwell.
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  5.  11
    Fifty Voices of Disbelief: Why We Are Atheists. Edited by Russell Blackford and Udo Schüklenk. Pp. Ix, 346, Oxford, Wiley‐Blackwell, 2009. £16.99. [REVIEW]Jonathan Wright - 2018 - Heythrop Journal 59 (3):631-631.
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  6. 50 Voices of Disbelief: Why We Are Atheists.Russell Blackford & Udo Schüklenk (eds.) - 2011 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    _50 Voices of Disbelief: Why We Are Atheists presents_ a collection of original essays drawn from an international group of prominent voices in the fields of academia, science, literature, media and politics who offer carefully considered statements of why they are atheists. Features a truly international cast of contributors, ranging from public intellectuals such as Peter Singer, Susan Blackmore, and A.C. Grayling, novelists, such as Joe Haldeman, and heavyweight philosophers of religion, including Graham Oppy and Michael Tooley Contributions (...)
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  7.  42
    Gavin Hyman: A Short History of Atheism: London, UK: I.B. Tauris, 2010, Xx and 212 Pp $85.00 , $25.00 Russell Blackford and Udo Schüklenk : 50 Voices of Disbelief: Why We Are Atheists Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2009, Ix and 346 Pp, $94.95 , $29.95. [REVIEW]Herbert Berg - 2013 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 73 (1):77-80.
  8. 50 Voices of Disbelief: Why We Are Atheists.Russell Blackford, SchÜ & Udo Klenk (eds.) - 2009 - Wiley-Blackwell.
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  9. 50 Voices of Disbelief: Why We Are Atheists.Russell Blackford & Udo Schüklenk (eds.) - 2009 - Wiley-Blackwell.
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  10.  46
    Russell Blackford and Udo Schüklenk (Eds.), 50 Voices of Disbelief. Why We Are Atheists.John-Stewart Gordon - 2010 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (4):477-482.
  11.  19
    Russell Blackford and Udo Schüklenk , 50 Voices of Disbelief. Why We Are Atheists: Wiley-Blackwell: Malden MA/Oxford/West Sussex, 2009, Pp. 346. ISBN-10: 1405190469. £16.99 , £55.John-Stewart Gordon - 2010 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (4):477-482.
  12.  8
    Russell Blackford and Udo Schüklenk , 50 Voices of Disbelief. Why We Are Atheists: Wiley-Blackwell: Malden MA/Oxford/West Sussex 2009, Pp. 346. ISBN-10: 1405190469. £16.99 , £55.John-Stewart Gordon - 2012 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (2):271-276.
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  13. Should CSR Give Atheists Epistemic Assurance? On Beer-Goggles, BFFs, and Skepticism Regarding Religious Beliefs.Justin L. Barrett & Ian M. Church - 2013 - The Monist 96 (3):311-324.
    Recent work in cognitive science of religion (CSR) is beginning to converge on a very interesting thesis—that, given the ordinary features of human minds operating in typical human environments, we are naturally disposed to believe in the existence of gods, among other religious ideas (e.g., seeAtran [2002], Barrett [2004; 2012], Bering [2011], Boyer [2001], Guthrie [1993], McCauley [2011], Pyysiäinen [2004; 2009]). In this paper, we explore whether such a discovery ultimately helps or hurts the atheist position—whether, for example, it lends (...)
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  14.  21
    Bailer-Jones, Daniela M. Scientific Models in Philosophy of Science, University of Pittsburgh Press, 2009, 248 Pp. Blackell, Mark, John Duncan, and Simon Kow, Eds. Rousseau and Desire, University of Toronto Press, 2009, 206 Pp. Blackford, Russell, and Udo Schuklenk. 50 Voices of Disbelief: Why We. [REVIEW]Are Atheists - 2010 - Metaphilosophy 41 (3):0026-1068.
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  15. Are “Evangelical Atheists” Too Outspoken?Paul Kurtz - forthcoming - Free Inquiry.
     
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  16.  12
    There Are Plenty of Atheists in Foxholes—in Sweden.Jakob Moström & Pehr Granqvist - 2014 - Archive for the Psychology of Religion 36 (2):199-213.
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  17.  11
    Atheists Giving Thanks to the Sun.Eric Steinhart - forthcoming - Philosophia:1-14.
    I argue that it is rational and appropriate for atheists to give thanks to deep impersonal agents for the benefits they give to us. These agents include our evolving biosphere, the sun, and our finely-tuned universe. Atheists can give thanks to evolution by sacrificially burning works of art. They can give thanks to the sun by performing rituals in solar calendars. They can give thanks to our finely-tuned universe, and to existence itself, by doing science and philosophy. But (...)
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  18.  14
    Faith for Atheists and Agnostics.Wallace A. Murphree - 1991 - Sophia 30 (2-3):59-70.
    In this paper I challenge both the contemporary secular view that religious faith is not a virtue, and also the contemporary theistic view that religious faith is a virtue that is unavailable to nonbelievers. Although these views appear reasonable from the respective sides when faith is interpreted as belief, if faith is understood to be the entrusting of one’s ultimate concerns to whatever powers are in control (as I suggest), then such faith, with its accompanying ‘freedom from bondage’ (Spinoza), not (...)
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  19. New Atheists.James E. Taylor - 2017 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    The New Atheists The New Atheists are authors of early twenty-first century books promoting atheism. These authors include Sam Harris, Richard Dawkins, Daniel Dennett, and Christopher Hitchens. The “New Atheist” label for these critics of religion and religious belief emerged out of journalistic commentary on the contents and impacts of their books. A standard observation is … Continue reading New Atheists →.
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  20.  46
    Why Spinoza Is Intolerant of Atheists.Michael A. Rosenthal - 2012 - Review of Metaphysics 65 (4):813-839.
    This paper tests the extent of Spinoza’s liberalism through examining the question whether he would tolerate atheists. The first section analyzes the meaning of atheism through the epistolary exchange with Lambert van Velthuysen. It argues that it makes a difference whether Spinoza is an atheist in the strict sense—someone who explicitly denies the existence of God—or a deist—someone who holds a view of unorthodox God. Spinoza denies the charge that his idea of God undermines morality and he also defends (...)
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  21.  24
    Is Continental Philosophy Just Catholicism for Atheists?: On the Political Relevance of Kenosis.J. Aaron Simmons - 2008 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 15 (1):94-111.
    There is much within contemporary continental philosophy that might give the indication that it is really just disguised Christian theology. However, in line with Hent de Vries and in contrast to Dominique Janicaud, I contend that there are reasons for taking continental God-talk seriously on purely philosophical grounds. On this basis, I then go on to advocate a specific form of God-talk-that dealing with kenosis-as being deeply relevant to contemporary politics because of the way in which it provides an argument (...)
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  22. On Whether B-Theoretic Atheists Should Fear Death.Natalja Deng - 2015 - Philosophia 43 (4):1011-1021.
    In this paper I revisit a dispute between Mikel Burley and Robin Le Poidevin about whether or not the B-theory of time can give its adherents any reason to be less afraid of death. In ‘Should a B-theoretic atheist fear death?’, Burley argues that even on Le Poidevin’s understanding of the B-theory, atheists shouldn’t be comforted. His reason is that the prevalent B-theoretic account of our attitudes towards the past and future precludes treating our fear of death as unwarranted. (...)
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  23. Epicureans and Atheists in France, 1650–1729.Alan Charles Kors - 2016 - Cambridge University Press.
    Atheism was the most foundational challenge to early-modern French certainties. Theologians and philosophers labelled such atheism as absurd, confident that neither the fact nor behaviour of nature was explicable without reference to God. The alternative was a categorical naturalism, whose most extreme form was Epicureanism. The dynamics of the Christian learned world, however, which this book explains, allowed the wide dissemination of the Epicurean argument. By the end of the seventeenth century, atheism achieved real voice and life. This book examines (...)
     
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  24.  14
    No Religion, No (Political) Values? Political Attitudes of Atheists in Comparison.Simon Geissbühler - 2002 - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 1 (2):114-122.
    On the basis of survey data for Switzerland, this study systematically compares the political attitudes of atheists with the ones of theists. As expected theoretically, there are indeed statistically significant differences in the attitudinal structures of these two groups. Atheists are more to the political left than theists, they have a higher degree of interest in politics, but less trust in established institutions. These results lead to two conclusions. First, the author pleads for a more systematic integration of (...)
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  25.  14
    Critical Study of Michael Novak, No One Sees God: The Dark Night of Atheists and Believers.Richard T. McClelland - 2008 - Philo 11 (2):203-226.
    This study develops a concept of “justificatory respect” and applies it to a recent theistic response to contemporary presentations ofatheism and agnosticism. The related concepts of reflexive justificatory respect (applying to one’s own positions) and of an associated epistemic virtue as necessary but not sufficient conditions for theists and unbelievers to engage one another in successful dialogical inquiry are also developed. Novak’s book signally fails to exercise both kinds of respect. His failures serve to partially delineate the condition for success (...)
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  26.  25
    Are Mormons Theists?A. A. Howsepian - 1996 - Religious Studies 32 (3):357 - 370.
    In this essay I plan to meet the following four objectives: (i) Show that a commonly made inference by Christian apologists, namely inferring proposition (1) The Mormon Church is polytheistic, from proposition (2) The Mormon Church both appears to believe in the existence of numerous Gods and appears to worship numerous Gods, is an invalid inference; (ii) defend the truth of proposition (2); (iii) reject proposition (i); and (iv) given the cogency of my arguments, attempt as best I can to (...)
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  27. Analytic Philosophy (Alternative Title 'Analytic Atheism?').Charles Pigden - 2013 - In Stephen Bullivant & Michael Ruse (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Atheism. Oxford University Press. pp. 307-319.
    Most analytic philosophers are atheists, but is there a deep connection between analytic philosophy and atheism? The paper argues a) that the founding fathers of analytic philosophy were mostly teenage atheists before they became philosophers; b) that analytic philosophy was invented partly because it was realized that the God-substitute provided by the previously fashionable philosophy - Absolute Idealism – could not cut the spiritual mustard; c) that analytic philosophy developed an unhealthy obsession with meaninglessness which led to a (...)
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  28.  39
    All Properties Are Divine or God Exists.Frode Bjørdal - 2018 - Logic and Logical Philosophy 3 (27):329-350.
    A metaphysical system engendered by a third order quantified modal logic S5 plus impredicative comprehension principles is used to isolate a third order predicate D, and by being able to impredicatively take a second order predicate G to hold of an individual just if the individual necessarily has all second order properties which are D we in Section 2 derive the thesis (40) that all properties are D or some individual is G. In Section 3 theorems 1 to 3 suggest (...)
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  29.  63
    Religious Naturalism and its Rivals.Mikael Stenmark - 2013 - Religious Studies 49 (4):529-550.
    The aim of this article is to explore where and why religious naturalism differs from its rivals, and also to consider some of the challenges religious naturalism faces. I argue that religious naturalism is best conceived as a reaction against both theists who are religious and naturalists who are atheists: the best option is taken to be a naturalist who is religious. Nevertheless, it is quite difficult to say more exactly what claims the view contains. In fact, it is (...)
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  30. Philosophers Without Gods: Meditations on Atheism and the Secular Life.Louise Antony (ed.) - 2007 - Oup Usa.
    Atheists are frequently demonized as arrogant intellectuals, antagonistic to religion, devoid of moral sentiments, advocates of an "anything goes" lifestyle. Now, in this revealing volume, nineteen leading philosophers open a window on the inner life of atheism, shattering these common stereotypes as they reveal how they came to turn away from religious belief. These highly engaging personal essays capture the marvelous diversity to be found among atheists, providing a portrait that will surprise most readers. Many of the authors, (...)
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  31. Time Was Created by a Timeless Point: An Atheist Explanation of Spacetime.Quentin Smith - 2002 - In Gregory E. Ganssle & David M. Woodruff (eds.), God and Time: Essays on the Divine Nature. Oxford Up. pp. 95-128.
    There are two familiar, contemporary responses to this question. The theist says that the question has an answer and that this answer is that God caused spacetime to begin to exist. The standard response of the atheist is to say that there is no answer to this question; spacetime’s beginning to exist is a brute fact or has no explanation. This standard atheist response seems to give theism a prima facie theoretical superiority to atheism; theists offer a detailed explanatory hypothesis (...)
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  32.  54
    Secular Spirituality and the Logic of Giving Thanks.John Bishop - 2010 - Sophia 49 (4):523-534.
    Some atheists are attracted to the idea of a secular spirituality that carries no commitment to the existence of God or anything similar. Is this a coherent possibility? This paper seeks to define what we mean by a ‘spirituality’ by examining Robert C. Solomon’s defence of spirituality for the religious skeptic, and pursues the question of its coherence by reflecting on what is implied by taking thankfulness to be a proper response to our existence.
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  33. 5 Questions on Science & Religion.Massimo Pigliucci - 2014 - In Gregg D. Caruso (ed.), Science and Religion: 5 Questions. Automatic Press. pp. 163-170.
    Are science and religion compatible when it comes to understanding cosmology (the origin of the universe), biology (the origin of life and of the human species), ethics, and the human mind (minds, brains, souls, and free will)? Do science and religion occupy non-overlapping magisteria? Is Intelligent Design a scientific theory? How do the various faith traditions view the relationship between science and religion? What, if any, are the limits of scientific explanation? What are the most important open questions, problems, or (...)
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  34. Atheism and the Benefits of Theistic Belief.Christian Miller - 2012 - In Jonathan Kvanvig (ed.), Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Religion. Oxford University Press. pp. 97-125.
    Most atheists are error theorists about theists; they claim that theists have genuine beliefs about the existence and nature of a divine being, but as a matter of fact no such divine being exists. Thus on their view the relevant theistic beliefs are mistaken. As error theorists, then, atheists need to arrive at some answer to the question of what practical course of action the atheist should adopt towards the theistic beliefs held by committed theists. The most natural (...)
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  35. Science and Religion: 5 Questions.Gregg D. Caruso - 2014 - Automatic Press/VIP.
    Are science and religion compatible when it comes to understanding cosmology (the origin of the universe), biology (the origin of life and of the human species), ethics, and the human mind (minds, brains, souls, and free will)? Do science and religion occupy non-overlapping magisteria? Is Intelligent Design a scientific theory? How do the various faith traditions view the relationship between science and religion? What, if any, are the limits of scientific explanation? What are the most important open questions, problems, or (...)
     
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  36.  25
    Being Grateful for Being: Being, Reverence and Finitude.Damon A. Young - 2005 - Sophia 44 (2):31-53.
    Atheists are rarely associated with holiness, yet they can have deeply spiritual experiences. Once such experience of the author exemplified ‘the holy’ as defined by Otto. However, the subjectivism of Otto’s Kantianism undermines Otto’s otherwise fruitful approach. While the work of Hegel overcomes this, it is too rationalistic to account for mortal life. Seeking to avoid these shortcomings, this paper places ‘holiness’ within a self-differentiating ontological unity, the Heideggerian ‘fourfold’. This unity can only be experienced by confronting groundless finite (...)
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  37.  43
    Effect of Academic Degree and Discipline on Religious Beliefs and Evolution Acceptance: Survey at a Chilean University.César Marín & Guillermo DʾElía - 2016 - Zygon 51 (2):277-292.
    Affiliation with a scientific area or degree program could affect one´s religious beliefs and acceptance of evolution; however, this issue has been poorly studied. Moreover, little information is available regarding Chilean university scientists’ views on religion and evolution. This study aims to provide the first documentation of the opinion of scientists at a Chilean University with regard to religion and evolution. This was done by conducting a personal survey of first and last year undergraduate students, graduate students, and faculty. We (...)
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  38.  99
    Worshipworthiness and the Mormon Concept of God.Blake T. Ostler - 1997 - Religious Studies 33 (3):315-326.
    This paper is a reply to A. A. Howsepian in "Religious Studies" 32 (1996), 357-70. Howsepian there argues that Mormons are atheists because they acknowledge no greatest conceivable being and fail to have a fitting object of worship. Howsepian accuses Mormons of crude polytheism and of conceiving of their divinities as capable of progression. In reply, it is pointed out that Howsepian frequently misrepresents Mormon theology. Once a distinction is made between divine persons (which may be multiple) and divinity (...)
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  39. The Existence of God: A Philosophical Introduction.Yujin Nagasawa - 2011 - Routledge.
    Does God exist? What are the various arguments that seek to prove the existence of God? Can atheists refute these arguments? The Existence of God: A Philosophical Introduction assesses classical and contemporary arguments concerning the existence of God: the ontological argument, introducing the nature of existence, possible worlds, parody objections, and the evolutionary origin of the concept of God the cosmological argument, discussing metaphysical paradoxes of infinity, scientific models of the universe, and philosophers’ discussions about ultimate reality and the (...)
     
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  40.  7
    Does Theism Need a Theodicy?Richard Swinburne - 1988 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 18 (2):287-311.
    To many atheists the existence of evil seems to provide a conclusive argument against the existence of God. God is by definition omnipotent and perfectly good; a perfectly good being will remove evil in so far as he can, an omnipotent being can remove any evil he chooses, so if there is a God there will be no evil, but there is evil, hence there is no God. Theists normally challenge this argument by challenging the premiss that a perfectly (...)
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  41. Does Religious Belief Impact Philosophical Analysis?Kevin P. Tobia - 2016 - Religion, Brain and Behavior 6 (1):56-66.
    One popular conception of natural theology holds that certain purely rational arguments are insulated from empirical inquiry and independently establish conclusions that provide evidence, justification, or proof of God’s existence. Yet, some raise suspicions that philosophers and theologians’ personal religious beliefs inappropriately affect these kinds of arguments. I present an experimental test of whether philosophers and theologians’ argument analysis is influenced by religious commitments. The empirical findings suggest religious belief affects philosophical analysis and offer a challenge to theists and (...), alike: reevaluate the scope of natural theology’s conclusions or acknowledge and begin to address the influence of religious belief. (shrink)
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  42.  41
    No Gaps, No God?Teed Rockwell - 2009 - Philosophy and Theology 21 (1/2):129-153.
    Darwinian atheists ridicule the “God of the Gaps” argument, claiming that it is theology and/or metaphysics masquerading as science.This is true as far as it goes, but Darwinian atheism relies on an argument which is equally metaphysical, which I call the “No Gaps,No God” argument. This atheist argument is metaphysical because it relies on a kind of conceptual necessity, rather than scientificobservations or experiments. “No Gaps No God” is a much better metaphysical argument than “God of the Gaps,” because (...)
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  43.  10
    No Gaps, No God?: On the Differences Between Scientific and Metaphysical Claims.Teed Rockwell - 2009 - Philosophy and Theology 21 (1/2):129-153.
    Darwinian atheists ridicule the “God of the Gaps” argument, claiming that it is theology and/or metaphysics masquerading as science.This is true as far as it goes, but Darwinian atheism relies on an argument which is equally metaphysical, which I call the “No Gaps,No God” argument. This atheist argument is metaphysical because it relies on a kind of conceptual necessity, rather than scientificobservations or experiments. “No Gaps No God” is a much better metaphysical argument than “God of the Gaps,” because (...)
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  44. Dawkins’s Gambit, Hume’s Aroma, and God’s Simplicity.Erik Wielenberg - 2009 - Philosophia Christi 11 (1):113-127.
    I examine the central atheistic argument of Richard Dawkins’s book The God Delusion (“Dawkins’s Gambit”) and illustrate its failure. I further show that Dawkins’s Gambit is a fragment of a more comprehensive critique of theism found in David Hume’s Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion. Among the failings of Dawkins’s Gambit is that it is directed against a version of the God Hypothesis that few traditional monotheists hold. Hume’s critique is more challenging in that it targets versions of the God Hypothesis that (...)
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  45. Should We Want God to Exist?Guy Kahane - 2011 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 82 (3):674-696.
    Whether God exists is a metaphysical question. But there is also a neglected evaluative question about God’s existence: Should we want God to exist? Very many, including many atheists and agnostics, appear to think we should. Theists claim that if God didn’t exist things would be far worse, and many atheists agree; they regret God’s inexistence. Some remarks by Thomas Nagel suggest an opposing view: that we should want God not to exist. I call this view anti-theism. I (...)
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  46.  85
    Is God a Mindless Vegetable? Cudworth on Stoic Theology.John Sellars - 2011 - Intellectual History Review 21 (2):121-133.
    In the sixteenth century the Stoics were deemed friends of humanist Christians, but by the eighteenth century they were attacked as atheists. What happened in the intervening period? In the middle of this period falls Ralph Cudworth’s True Intellectual System of the Universe (1678), which contains a sustained analysis of Stoic theology. In Cudworth’s complex taxonomy Stoicism appears twice, both as a form of atheism and an example of imperfect theism. Whether the Stoics are theists or atheists hinges (...)
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  47.  35
    The Psychology of Atheism.Miguel Farias - 2013 - In Stephen Bullivant & Michael Ruse (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Atheism. Oxford University Press. pp. 468.
    This essay suggests that atheists endorse a range of naturalistic beliefs, such as belief in progress and in science. Social-psychological evidence for this belief replacement hypothesis, where naturalistic beliefs take the place of supernatural ones, is reviewed. Atheists seem to implicitly use their naturalistic beliefs to alleviate feelings of uncertainty, anxiety and stress, a psychological function which, until recently, had only been reported for religious beliefs. The second part of the essay focuses on motivational implications of being an (...)
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  48. On The Relation Between Science and the Scientific Worldview.Josh Reeves - 2013 - Heythrop Journal 54 (4):554-562.
    It has been widely believed since the nineteenth century that modern science provides a serious challenge to religion, but less agreement as to the reason. One main complication is that whenever there has been broad consensus for a scientific theory that challenges traditional religious doctrines, one finds religious believers endorsing the theory or even formulating it. As a result, atheists who argue for the incompatibility of science and religion often go beyond the religious implications of individual scientific theories, arguing (...)
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  49. Fictional Theism.Roy Sorensen - 2015 - Analysis 75 (4):539-550.
    Creationists believe that C. K. Chesterton created Father Brown in his detective stories. Since creating implies a creation, Father Brown exists. Atheists object that the same reasoning could prove the existence of God. But creationists such as Jonathan Schaffer insist atheists do believe that God exists. Serious metaphysics rarely concerns existence. The disagreement between the theist and the atheist is about the nature of God, not His existence. Schaffer underestimates the religious imagination. There could be a religion that (...)
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  50.  71
    Two Worlds Apart: Religion and Ethics.J. Savulescu - 1998 - Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (6):382-384.
    In a recent article entitled, Requests "for inappropriate" treatment based on religious beliefs, Orr and Genesen claim that futile treatment should be provided to patients who request it if their request is based on a religious belief. I claim that this implies that we should also accede to requests for harmful or cost-ineffective treatments based on religious beliefs. This special treatment of religious requests is an example of special pleading on the part of theists and morally objectionable discrimination against (...). It also provides an excellent illustration of how different the practices of religion and ethics are. (shrink)
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