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Arianne Shahvisi
Brighton And Sussex Medical School
  1.  28
    Colonial monuments as slurring speech acts.Arianne Shahvisi - 2021 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 55 (3):453-468.
    Journal of Philosophy of Education, EarlyView.
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  2.  45
    A new Tuskegee? Unethical human experimentation and Western neocolonialism in the mass circumcision of African men.Max Fish, Arianne Shahvisi, Tatenda Gwaambuka, Godfrey B. Tangwa, Daniel Ncayiyana & Brian D. Earp - 2020 - Developing World Bioethics 21 (4):211-226.
  3.  11
    Medical ethics and the climate change emergency.Cressida Auckland, Jennifer Blumenthal-Barby, Kenneth Boyd, Brian D. Earp, Lucy Frith, Zoë Fritz, John McMillan, Arianne Shahvisi & Mehrunisha Suleman - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (12):939-940.
    The editors of the _Journal of Medical Ethics_ support the call of the UK Health Alliance on Climate for urgent action to ensure that the current Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change ‘finally delivers climate justice for Africa and vulnerable countries’. 1 As they note ‘Africa has suffered disproportionately although it has done little to cause the crisis’. The burden of climate change has thus far fallen disproportionately on Global South countries. The monsoon (...)
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  4.  9
    Instruments of health and harm: how the procurement of healthcare goods contributes to global health inequality.Mei L. Trueba, Mahmood F. Bhutta & Arianne Shahvisi - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (6):423-429.
    Many healthcare goods, such as surgical instruments, textiles and gloves, are manufactured in unregulated factories and sweatshops where, amongst other labour rights violations, workers are subject to considerable occupational health risks. In this paper we undertake an ethical analysis of the supply of sweatshop-produced surgical goods to healthcare providers, with a specific focus on the National Health Service of the United Kingdom. We contend that while labour abuses and occupational health deficiencies are morally unacceptable in the production of any commodity, (...)
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  5.  30
    Conscientious objection: a morally insupportable misuse of authority.Arianne Shahvisi - 2018 - Clinical Ethics 13 (2):82-87.
    In this paper, I argue that the conscience clause around abortion provision in England, Scotland and Wales is inadequate for two reasons. First, the patient and doctor are differently situated with respect to social power. Doctors occupy a position of significant moral and epistemic authority with respect to their patients, who are vulnerable and relatively disempowered. Doctors are rightly required to disclose their conscientious objection, but given the positioning of the patient and doctor, the act of doing so exploits the (...)
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  6.  27
    Engendering Harm: A Critique of Sex Selection For “Family Balancing”.Arianne Shahvisi - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (1):123-137.
    The most benign rationale for sex selection is deemed to be “family balancing.” On this view, provided the sex distribution of an existing offspring group is “unbalanced,” one may legitimately use reproductive technologies to select the sex of the next child. I present four novel concerns with granting “family balancing” as a justification for sex selection: families or family subsets should not be subject to medicalization; sex selection for “family balancing” entrenches heteronormativity, inflicting harm in at least three specific ways; (...)
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  7.  18
    Health worker migration and migrant healthcare: Seeking cosmopolitanism in the NHS.Arianne Shahvisi - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (6):334-342.
    The U.K.'s National Health Service (NHS) is critically reliant on staff from overseas, which means that a sizeable number of U.K. healthcare professionals have received their training at the cost of other states, whose populations are urgently in need of healthcare professionals. At the same time, while healthcare is widely seen as a primary good, many migrants are unable to access the NHS without charge, and anti‐immigration political trends are likely to further reduce that access. Both of these topics have (...)
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  8.  42
    No Understanding, No Consent: The Case Against Alternative Medicine.Arianne Shahvisi - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (2):69-76.
    The demand for informed consent in clinical medicine is usually justified on the basis that it promotes patient autonomy. In this article I argue that the most effective way to promote autonomy is to improve patient understanding in order to reduce the epistemic disparity between patient and medical professional. Informed consent therefore derives its moral value from its capacity to reduce inequalities of power as they derive from epistemic inequalities. So in order for a patient to have given informed consent, (...)
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  9.  28
    Medicine is Patriarchal, But Alternative Medicine is Not the Answer.Arianne Shahvisi - 2019 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 16 (1):99-112.
    Women are over-represented within alternative medicine, both as consumers and as service providers. In this paper, I show that the appeal of alternative medicine to women relates to the neglect of women’s health needs within scientific medicine. This is concerning because alternative medicine is severely limited in its therapeutic effects; therefore, those who choose alternative therapies are liable to experience inadequate healthcare. I argue that while many patients seek greater autonomy in alternative medicine, the absence of an evidence base and (...)
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  10.  26
    Tropicality and abjection: What do we really mean by “Neglected Tropical Diseases”?Arianne Shahvisi - 2019 - Developing World Bioethics 19 (4):224-234.
    Neglected tropical diseases are defined operationally as diseases that prevail in “tropical” regions and are under‐researched, under‐funded, and under‐treated compared with their disease burden. By analysing the adjectives “tropical” and “neglected,” I expose and interrogate the discourses within which the term “neglected tropical disease” derives its meaning. First, I argue that the term “tropical” conjures the notion of “tropicality,” a form of Othering which erroneously explains the disease‐prevalence of “tropical” regions by reference to environmental determinism, rather than colonialism and neocolonialism. (...)
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  11.  23
    Racism in healthcare and bioethics.Agomoni Ganguli-Mitra, Arianne Shahvisi, Angela Ballantyne & Keisha Ray - 2022 - Bioethics 36 (3):233-234.
    Bioethics, Volume 36, Issue 3, Page 233-234, March 2022.
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  12.  23
    Towards responsible ejaculations: the moral imperative for male contraceptive responsibility.Arianne Shahvisi - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (5):328-336.
    In this paper, I argue that men should take primary responsibility for protecting against pregnancy. Male long-acting reversible contraceptives are currently in development, and, once approved, should be used as the standard method for avoiding pregnancy. Since women assume the risk of pregnancy when they engage in penis-in-vagina sex, men should do their utmost to ensure that their ejaculations are responsible, otherwise women shoulder a double burden of pregnancy risk plus contraceptive responsibility. Changing the expectations regarding responsibility for contraception would (...)
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  13.  23
    Why UK doctors should be troubled by female genital mutilation legislation.Arianne Shahvisi - 2017 - Clinical Ethics 12 (2):102-108.
    A UK doctor was recently acquitted of charges of reinstating a variety of female genital mutilation after delivering a child. In this paper, I contend that this incident reflects a broader confusion concerning the ethico-legal status of non-therapeutic genital surgeries for children and adults, which are not derivable from tenets of medical ethics, but rather violate them. I argue that medical professionals have an obligation to announce and address this confusion in order to motivate legislative reform, since the inconsistency of (...)
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  14.  11
    Austerity or Xenophobia? The Causes and Costs of the “Hostile Environment” in the NHS.Arianne Shahvisi - 2019 - Health Care Analysis 27 (3):202-219.
    During the “age of austerity” the UK government has progressively limited free health services for “overseas visitors” on the grounds of fairness and frugality. This is despite the fact that the cost of the additional bureaucracy required by the new system and the public health consequences are expected to exceed the sums saved. In this article I explore the interaction between the discourses of austerity and xenophobia as they relate to migrants’ access to healthcare. By examining the available data and (...)
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  15.  18
    Cutting slack and cutting corners: an ethical and pragmatic response to Arora and Jacobs’ ‘Female genital alteration: a compromise solution’.Arianne Shahvisi - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (3):156-157.
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  16.  20
    Why it is unethical to charge migrant women for pregnancy care in the National Health Service.Arianne Shahvisi & Fionnuala Finnerty - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (8):489-496.
    Pregnancy care is chargeable for migrants who do not have indefinite leave to remain in the UK. Women who are not ‘ordinarily resident’, including prospective asylum applicants, some refused asylum-seekers, unidentified victims of trafficking and undocumented people are required to pay substantial charges in order to access antenatal, intrapartum and postnatal services as well as abortion care within the National Health Service. In this paper, we consider the ethical issues generated by the exclusion of pregnancy care from the raft of (...)
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  17.  3
    The wrong word for the job? The ethics of collecting data on 'race in academic publishing.John McMillan, Brian D. Earp, Wing May Kong, Mehrunisha Suleman & Arianne Shahvisi - 2024 - Journal of Medical Ethics 50 (3):149-151.
    Socially responsible publishers, such as the BMJ Publishing Group, have demonstrated a commitment to health equity and working towards rectifying the structural racism that exists both in healthcare and in medical publishing. 1 The commitment of academic publishers to collecting information relevant to promoting equity and diversity is important and commendable where it leads to that result. 2 However, collecting sensitive demographic data is not a morally neutral activity. Rather, it carries with it both known and potential risks. Among these (...)
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  18.  4
    Decommodifying the most important determinant of health.Arianne Shahvisi - 2023 - Journal of Medical Ethics 49 (10):661-662.
    Among the most harrowing visuals of Britain’s ongoing ‘cost of living crisis’ are the security tags that began to appear on cheese, butter, chicken, sweets and infant formula milk in 2022. A week’s worth of formula milk—the sole or main food of the vast majority of infants for the first 6 months of life—now costs between £9.39 and £15.95.1 Low-income households are entitled to a ‘Healthy Start’ welfare payment, intended to avert malnutrition among the poorest children, but the weekly allowance (...)
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  19.  3
    Arguing for a better world: how philosophy can help us fight for social justice.Arianne Shahvisi - 2023 - New York: Penguin Books.
    A book that shows us how to work through thorny moral questions by examining their parts in broad daylight, equipping us to not only identify our own positions but to defend them as well. It demonstrates the relevance of philosophy to our everyday lives, and offers some clear-eyed tools to those who want to learn how to better fight for justice and liberation for all.
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  20.  13
    Centring race, deprivation, and disease severity in healthcare priority setting.Arianne Shahvisi - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (2):77-78.
    The fair distribution of health resources is critical to health justice. But distributing healthcare equitably requires careful attention to the existing distribution of other resources, and the economic system which produces these inequalities. Health is strongly determined by socioeconomic factors, such as the effects of racism on the health of communities of colour, as well as the broader market-oriented healthcare and pharmaceutical systems that put the pursuit of profit above the alleviation of suffering. Two papers in this issue confront health (...)
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  21.  21
    Gender and Global Justice. By Alison Jaggar. Polity Press, 2014, pp. 288, £16.99. ISBN 978-0-7456-6377-7.Arianne Shahvisi - 2015 - Philosophy 90 (4):697-702.
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  22.  11
    Particles Do Not Conspire.Arianne Shahvisi - 2019 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 50 (4):521-543.
    The aim of this paper is to debunk the assertion that miraculous “conspiracies” between fundamental particles are required to bring about the projectibility of special science generalisations. Albert and Loewer have proposed a theory of lawhood which supplements the Best System of fundamental laws with a statistical postulate over the initial conditions of the universe, thereby rendering special science generalisations highly probable, and dispelling the conspiracy. However, concerns have been raised about its ability to confer typicality upon special science generalisations (...)
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  23.  33
    Redistribution and moral consistency: arguments for granting automatic citizenship to refugees.Arianne Shahvisi - 2020 - Journal of Global Ethics 16 (2):182-202.
    1. Birth within a particular state is a major determinant of a person’s life course: their life expectancy, health possibilities, income, level of education, employment opportunities, and the safet...
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  24.  22
    Resisting Wrongful Explanations.Arianne Shahvisi - 2021 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 19 (2).
    In this paper I explore a method for refusing uptake when explanations are morally and epistemically troubling. Gaile Pohlhaus Jr has shown that imploring marginalised people to “understand” marginalising practices amounts to a request that they legitimise their own marginalisation. In this paper, I expand upon this analysis with the aim of describing a method for withholding understanding. First, I analyse understanding through its association with explanation. Drawing on pragmatic theories, I describe explanations as speech acts whose success depends on (...)
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  25.  28
    Resisting Reality: Social Construction and Social CritiqueSally Haslanger New York: Oxford University Press, 2012, 512pp, $35 ISBN 978-0-19-989262-4. [REVIEW]Arianne Shahvisi - 2015 - Philosophy 90 (1):156-161.
  26.  19
    Tainted: How Philosophy of Science Can Expose Bad Science. [REVIEW]Arianne Shahvisi - 2016 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 30 (2):193-196.
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