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Armand D'angour [8]Armand J. D'angour [3]
  1.  19
    How the Dithyramb Got its Shape.Armand D'angour - 1997 - Classical Quarterly 47 (02):331-.
    Pindar's Dithyramb 2opens with a reference to the historical development of the genre it exemplifies, the celebrated circular chorus of classical Greece. The first two lines were long known from various citations, notably in Athenaeus, whose sources included the fourth-century authors Heraclides of Pontus and Aristotle's pupil Clearchus of Soli. The third line appears, only partly legible, on a papyrus fragment published in 1919, which preserves some thirty lines of the dithyramb including most of the first antistrophe.
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  2.  15
    Ad Unguem.Armand J. D'Angour - 1999 - American Journal of Philology 120 (3):411-427.
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  3.  19
    Catullus 107: A Callimachean Reading.Armand J. D'angour - 2000 - Classical Quarterly 50 (02):615-.
    Excitement struggles with the restraint of form and language and the artifice of verbal repetition… runs riot.’ The repetition is more pronounced and personal here than in another Lesbia epigram, no. 70, where ‘the repetition dicit…dicit makes it certain that Catullus had [Callimachus, Ep. 25 Pf.] in mind’. Poem 70 illustrates how Catullus might allude to and adapt a Hellenistic model in expressing his personal feelings; while the longer elegiac poems in particular show the depth of his engagement with Callimachean (...)
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  4.  38
    Conquering Love: Sappho 31 and Catullus 51.Armand D'angour - 2006 - Classical Quarterly 56 (01):297-.
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  5.  31
    Hunter (R.) Plato's Symposium. Pp. Xiv + 150. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004. Paper, £9.99 (Cased, £45). ISBN: 978-0-19-516080-2 (978-0-19-516079-6 Hbk). [REVIEW]Armand D'angour - 2007 - The Classical Review 57 (01):38-.
  6.  6
    The Greeks and the New: Novelty in Ancient Greek Imagination and Experience.Armand D'Angour - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: 1. New, new, new; 2. Loosening the grip of the past; 3. The transformations of Kaineus; 4. Old and new; 5. Nothing new under the sun; 6. The birth of Athena; 7. Inventions of Eris; 8. The newest song; 9. Constructions of novelty; 10. So what's new?
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  7. Music, Text, and Culture in Ancient Greece.Tom Phillips & Armand D'Angour (eds.) - 2018 - Oxford University Press.
    What difference does music make to performance poetry, and how did the ancients understand this relationship? This volume explores the interaction of music and language in ancient Greek poetry, arguing that music crucially informs the ways in which these texts create meaning and exploring its place in contemporary critical writings.
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