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  1.  49
    The Financialisation of Business Ethics.Armin Beverungen, Stephen Dunne & Casper Hoedemaekers - 2013 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 22 (1):102-117.
    Business schools have become implicated in the widespread demonisation of the financial classes. By educating those held most responsible for the crisis – financial traders and speculators – they are said to have produced ruthlessly talented graduates who have ambition in abundance but little sense for social responsibility or ethics. This ethical lack thrives upon the trading floor within a compelling critique of the complicity of the pedagogy of the business school with the financial crisis of the global economy. An (...)
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  2.  13
    The Financialisation of Business Ethics.Armin Beverungen, Stephen Dunne & Casper Hoedemaekers - 2013 - Business Ethics: A European Review 22 (1):102-117.
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  3.  67
    Editorial Introduction: Where is Business Ethics?Armin Beverungen & Peter Case - 2011 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 20 (3):229-232.
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    Editorial Introduction: Where is Business Ethics?Armin Beverungen & Peter Case - 2011 - Business Ethics: A European Review 20 (3):229-232.
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  5.  19
    Cognition in High-Frequency Trading: The Costs of Consciousness and the Limits of Automation.Armin Beverungen & Ann-Christina Lange - 2018 - Theory, Culture and Society 35 (6):75-95.
    Certain strands of contemporary media theory are concerned with the ways in which computational environments exploit the ‘missing half-second’ of human perception and thereby influence, control or exploit humans at an affective level. The ‘technological unconscious’ of our times is often understood to work at this affective level, and high-frequency trading is regularly provided as a primary illustrative example of the contagious dynamics it produces. We challenge and complicate this account of the relation between consciousness, affect and media technologies by (...)
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