16 found
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  1. Physical Cruelty Toward Animals in Massachusetts, 1975-1996.Arnold Arluke & Carter Luke - 1997 - Society and Animals 5 (3):195-204.
    This article describes the nature of animal abuse and the response of the criminal justice system to all cruelty cases prosecuted by the Massachusetts Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals between 1975 and 1996. Dogs were the most common target; when combined with cats, these domestic animals composed the vast majority of incidents. Almost all of these animals were owned, and females were the majority of complainants. Suspects were almost always young males, and most of the time they allegedly (...)
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  2.  92
    A Sociology of Sociological Animal Studies.Arnold Arluke - 2002 - Society and Animals 10 (4):369-374.
  3.  39
    Just a Dog: Understanding Animal Cruelty and Ourselves.Arnold Arluke - 2006 - Temple University Press.
    Agents: feigning authority -- Adolescents: appropriating adulthood -- Hoarders: shoring up self -- Shelter workers: finding authenticity -- Marketers: Celebrating community -- Cruelty is good to think.
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  4.  51
    Associate Editor's Overview.Arnold Arluke - 1994 - Society and Animals 2 (1):1-2.
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  5.  20
    Press Reports of Animal Hoarding.Michelle Papazian, Jane Nathanson, Edward Messner, Carter Luke, Gary Patronek, Gail Steketee, Randy Frost & Arnold Arluke - 2002 - Society and Animals 10 (2):113-135.
    This article explores how the press reports nonhuman animal hoarding and hoarders. It discusses how 100 articles from 1995 to the present were content analyzed. Analysis revealed five emotional themes that include drama, revulsion, sympathy, indignation, and humor. While these themes draw readers' attention and make disparate facts behind cases understandable by packaging them in familiar formats, they also present an inconsistent picture of animal hoarding that can confuse readers about the nature and significance of this behavior as well as (...)
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  6.  38
    Managing the Stigma of Outlaw Breeds: A Case Study of Pit Bull Owners.Gary Patronek, Arnold Arluke & Hillary Twining - 2000 - Society and Animals 8 (1):25-52.
    Ethnographic interviews were conducted with 28 pit bull "owners" to explore the sociological experience of having a dog with a negative image. Results indicate that the vast majority of respondents felt that these dogs were stigmatized because of their breed. Respondents made this conclusion because friends, family, and strangers were apprehensive in the presence of their dogs and because they made accusations about the breed's viciousness and lack of predictability. In the face of this stigma, respondents resorted to using a (...)
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  7.  24
    Human–Animal Connections: Recent Findings on the Anthrozoology of Cruelty.Harold Herzog & Arnold Arluke - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3):230-231.
    Recent findings in anthrozoology – the study of human–animal interactions – shed light on psychological and social aspects of cruelty. Here we briefly discuss four areas that connect animal cruelty and cruelty directed toward humans: (1) voices of perpetrators and their audiences, (2) gender differences in cruelty, (3) cruelty as play, and (4) the putative relationship between animal abuse and interpersonal violence.
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  8.  17
    Loving Them to Death: Blame-Displacing Strategies of Animal Shelter Workers and Surrenderers.Stephanie S. Frommer & Arnold Arluke - 1999 - Society and Animals 7 (1):1-16.
    This article examines how shelter workers and individuals who surrender their companion animals to shelters manage guilt about killing previously valued animals. Researchers used an ethnographic approach that entailed open-ended interviews and directobservations of workers and surrenderers in a major, metropolitan shelter. Both workers and surrenderers used blame displacement as a mechanism for dealing with their guilt over euthanasia or its possibility. Understanding this coping strategy provides insights into how society continues to relinquish animal companions-despite the animals' chances of death-as (...)
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  9.  23
    Associate Editor's Introduction: Bringing Animals Into Social Scientific Research.Arnold Arluke - 1993 - Society and Animals 1 (1):5-7.
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  10.  11
    Society & Animals Journal of Human-Animal Studies.Hillary Twining, Arnold Arluke & Gary Patronek - 2000 - Society and Animals 8 (1).
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  11.  13
    Guest Editors' Introduction: Understanding Cruelty to Animals.Arnold Arluke & Randall Lockwood - 1997 - Society and Animals 5 (3):183-193.
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  12.  6
    The Significance of Seeking the Animal's Perspective.Arnold Arluke - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):13-14.
  13.  1
    Brill Online Books and Journals.Kenneth Shapiro, Arnold Arluke, Mary Midgley & Elizabeth Atwood Lawrence - 1993 - Society and Animals 1 (1).
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  14. Brill Online Books and Journals.Arnold Arluke, Randy Frost, Gail Steketee, Gary Patronek, Carter Luke, Edward Messner, Jane Nathanson & Michelle Papazian - 1994 - Society and Animals 2 (1).
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  15. The Swedish Swan Lady.Arnold Arluke & Ingvar Svanberg - 2016 - Society and Animals 24 (1):63-77.
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  16. Reducing the Link's False Positive Problem.Jack Levin & Arnold Arluke - 2009 - In Andrew Linzey (ed.), The Link Between Animal Abuse and Human Violence. Sussex Academic Press. pp. 163--171.
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