Results for 'Arthur S. Ripstein'

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  1. Force and Freedom: Kant's Legal and Political Philosophy.Arthur Ripstein - 2009 - Harvard University Press.
    In this masterful work, both an illumination of Kant's thought and an important contribution to contemporary legal and political theory, Arthur Ripstein gives a comprehensive yet accessible account of Kant's political philosophy. In addition to providing a clear and coherent statement of the most misunderstood of Kant's ideas, Ripstein also shows that Kant's views remain conceptually powerful and morally appealing today.
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  2.  4
    Arthur Ripstein.Arthur Ripstein - 1999 - Legal Theory 5 (3):235-263.
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  3.  60
    "Leibniz's Body Realism: Two Interpretations" Peter Loptson and R. T. W. Arthur.Richard Arthur - manuscript
    In this paper we argue for the robustness of Leibniz's commitment to the reality (but not substantiality) of body. We claim that a number of his most important metaphysical doctrines — among them, psychophysical parallelism, the harmony between efficient and final causes, the connection of all things, and the argument for the plurality of substances stemming from his solution to the continuum problem— make no sense if he is interpreted as giving an eliminative reduction of bodies to perceptions.
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  4. Phenomenology of Religion and the Art of Story-Telling: The Relevance of William Golding'S ‘The Inheritors’ To Religious Studies*: C. J. ARTHUR.C. J. Arthur - 1987 - Religious Studies 23 (1):59-79.
    One of the most extensive yet least conclusive methodological debates within religious studies revolves around the question of what, precisely, the phenomenology of religion is and what contribution it can make to the study of religion. I do not intend to answer this important question here. To do so satisfactorily would require a range of historical, philosophical and methodological inquiry which would go quite beyond the bounds of a single article. My intention in this paper is, by comparison, unambitious. It (...)
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  5.  74
    Douglas Joel Butler 1957-1991.Arthur S. Ripstein & Lynne Tirrell - 1992 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 65 (5):79 - 80.
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  6.  11
    Gauthier's Liberal Individual.Arthur Ripstein - 1989 - Dialogue 28 (01):63-.
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  7. The Social Contract Theorists: Critical Essays on Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau.John Charvet, Joshua Cohen, David Gauthier, M. M. Goldsmith, Jean Hampton, Gregory S. Kavka, Patrick Riley, Arthur Ripstein & A. John Simmons - 1998 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This rich collection will introduce students of philosophy and politics to the contemporary critical literature on the classical social contract political thinkers Thomas Hobbes , John Locke , and Jean-Jacques Rousseau . A dozen essays and book excerpts have been selected to guide students through the texts and to introduce them to current scholarly controversies surrounding the contractarian political theories of these three thinkers.
     
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  8. The Jurisprudence Annual Lecture 2015—Means and Ends.Arthur Ripstein - 2015 - Jurisprudence 6 (1):1-23.
    Legal doctrine often focuses on means rather than ends. In an action for breach of contract, the court asks only whether promisor performed as promised, and takes no account of what either promisor or promisee expected to gain by the transaction. The criminal law inquires into how the criminal was trying to accomplish some purpose, not what the purpose was. Most crimes are committed to get money, a purpose of which the law otherwise approves. This focus on means is often (...)
     
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  9.  1
    China's Wartime Finance and Inflation, 1937-1945.E. H. S. & Arthur N. Young - 1965 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 85 (4):609.
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    Crime, Freedom and Civic Bonds: Arthur Ripstein's Force and Freedom: Kant's Legal and Political Philosophy. [REVIEW]Ekow N. Yankah - 2012 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 6 (2):255-272.
    There is no question Arthur Ripstein’s Force and Freedom is an engaging and powerful book which will inform legal philosophy, particularly Kantian theories, for years to come. The text explores with care Kant’s legal and political philosophy, distinguishing it from his better known moral theory. Nor is Ripstein’s book simply a recounting of Kant’s legal and political theory. Ripstein develops Kant’s views in his own unique vision illustrating fresh ways of viewing the entire Kantian project. But (...)
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    [Book Review] Equality, Responsibility, and the Law. [REVIEW]Arthur Ripstein - 1999 - Ethics 111 (3):644-648.
    This book examines responsibility and luck as these issues arise in tort law, criminal law, and distributive justice. The central question is: whose bad luck is a particular piece of misfortune? Arthur Ripstein argues that there is a general set of principles to be found that clarifies responsibility in those cases where luck is most obviously an issue: accidents, mistakes, emergencies, and failed attempts at crime. In revealing how the problems that arise in tort and criminal law as (...)
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  12. Equality, Responsibility, and the Law.Arthur Ripstein - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book examines responsibility and luck as these issues arise in tort law, criminal law, and distributive justice. The central question is: whose bad luck is a particular piece of misfortune? Arthur Ripstein argues that there is a general set of principles to be found that clarifies responsibility in those cases where luck is most obviously an issue: accidents, mistakes, emergencies, and failed attempts at crime. In revealing how the problems that arise in tort and criminal law as (...)
     
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  13.  82
    Justice and Responsibility.Arthur Ripstein - 2004 - Canadian Journal of Law and Jurisprudence 17 (2):361-386.
    I argue that institutions charged with giving justice must understand responsibility in terms of norms governing what people are entitled to expect of each other. On this conception, the sort of responsibility that is of interest to private law or distributive justice is not a relation between a person and the consequence, but rather a relation between persons with respect to consequences. As a result, nonrelational facts about a person’s actions and the circumstances in which she performs them will never (...)
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  14. Index.Arthur Ripstein - 2009 - In Force and Freedom: Kant's Legal and Political Philosophy. Harvard University Press. pp. 389-399.
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  15.  38
    In Extremis.Arthur Ripstein - manuscript
    In one of the few widely discussed passages in the Doctrine of Right, Kant makes the surprising claim that a shipwrecked sailor who dislodges another from a plank that will support only one of them is "culpable, but not punishable." Many commentators regard this passage as a sort of smoking gun that shows that, in extremis, Kant resorts to the very sort of empirical and consequentialist reasoning that he claims to do without.2 My aim in this paper is to defend (...)
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  16.  30
    Form and Matter in Kantian Political Philosophy: A Reply.Arthur Ripstein - 2012 - European Journal of Philosophy 20 (3):487-496.
    This paper responds briefly to four reviews of Force and Freedom. Valentini and Sangiovanni criticize what they see as the excessive formalism of the Kantian enterprise, contending that the Kantian project is circular, because it defines rights and freedom together, and that this circularity renders it unable to say anything determinate about appropriate restrictions and permissions. I show that the appearance of circularity arises from a misconstrual of the Kantian idea of a right. Properly understood, Kantian rights are partially indeterminate, (...)
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  17.  72
    The Division of Responsibility and the Law of Tort.Arthur Ripstein - manuscript
    In A Theory of Justice, Rawls makes almost no mention of the issues of justice that animated philosophers in earlier centuries. There is no discussion of justice between persons, issues that Aristotle sought to explain under the idea of “corrective justice.” Nor is there discussion, except in passing, of punishment, another primary focus of the social contract approaches of Locke, Rousseau and Kant.1 My aim in this article is to argue that implicit in Rawls’s writing is a powerful and persuasive (...)
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  18.  41
    Critical Notice Too Much Invested to Quit.Arthur Ripstein - 2004 - Economics and Philosophy 20 (1):185-208.
    Faculty of Law and Department of Philosophy, University of Toronto 1. INTRODUCTION The economic analysis of law has gone through a remarkable change in the past decade and a half. The founding articles of the discipline – such classic pieces as Ronald Coase’s “The problem of social cost” (1960), Richard Posner’s “A theory of negligence” (1972) and Guido Calabresi and Douglas Malamed’s “Property rules, liability rules, and inalienability: One view of the cathedral” (1972) – offered economic analyses of familiar aspects (...)
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  19.  38
    Critical Notice.Arthur Ripstein - 2010 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 40 (4):669-699.
    The 2008 meltdown in global capital markets has led to a renewed interest in questions of economic distribution. Many people suggest that the motives, incentive structures, and institutions in place were inadequate and, for the first time in a generation, public debate is animated by arguments about the need for greater equality. G.A. Cohen's new book resonates with many of the themes of these debates; he advocates a more thoroughgoing equality, even more thoroughgoing than that demanded by John Rawls in (...)
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    Kant on Law and Justice.Arthur Ripstein - 2009 - In Thomas E. Hill (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Kant's Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 1-29.
  21.  6
    8. Public Right II: Roads to Freedom.Arthur Ripstein - 2009 - In Force and Freedom: Kant's Legal and Political Philosophy. Harvard University Press. pp. 232-266.
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    Strictly Speaking—It Went Without Saying.Brian Langille & Arthur Ripstein - 1996 - Legal Theory 2 (1):63.
    Herbert Simon once observed that watching an ant make its way across the uneven surface of a beach, one can easily be impressed—too impressed—with the foresight and complexity of the ant's internal map of the beach. Simon went on to point out that such an attribution of complexity to the ant makes a serious mistake. Most of the complexity is not in the ant but in the beach. The ant is just complex enough to use the features of the beach (...)
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    6. Three Defects in the State of Nature.Arthur Ripstein - 2009 - In Force and Freedom: Kant's Legal and Political Philosophy. Harvard University Press. pp. 145-181.
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    5. Private Right III: Contract and Consent.Arthur Ripstein - 2009 - In Force and Freedom: Kant's Legal and Political Philosophy. Harvard University Press. pp. 107-144.
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    10. Public Right IV: Punishment.Arthur Ripstein - 2009 - In Force and Freedom: Kant's Legal and Political Philosophy. Harvard University Press. pp. 300-324.
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  26. Kant and the Circumstances of Justice.Arthur Ripstein - 2012 - In Elisabeth Ellis (ed.), Kant's Political Theory: Interpretations and Applications. Pennsylvania State University Press.
     
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    3. Private Right I: Acquired Rights.Arthur Ripstein - 2009 - In Force and Freedom: Kant's Legal and Political Philosophy. Harvard University Press. pp. 57-85.
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    4. Private Right II: Property.Arthur Ripstein - 2009 - In Force and Freedom: Kant's Legal and Political Philosophy. Harvard University Press. pp. 86-106.
  29.  2
    9. Public Right III: Redistribution and Equality of Opportunity.Arthur Ripstein - 2009 - In Force and Freedom: Kant's Legal and Political Philosophy. Harvard University Press. pp. 267-299.
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    11. Public Right V: Revolution and the Right of Human Beings as Such.Arthur Ripstein - 2009 - In Force and Freedom: Kant's Legal and Political Philosophy. Harvard University Press. pp. 325-354.
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    2. The Innate Right of Humanity.Arthur Ripstein - 2009 - In Force and Freedom: Kant's Legal and Political Philosophy. Harvard University Press. pp. 30-56.
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  32.  1
    Appendix: “A Postulate Incapable of Further Proof”.Arthur Ripstein - 2009 - In Force and Freedom: Kant's Legal and Political Philosophy. Harvard University Press. pp. 355-388.
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    7. Public Right I: Giving Laws to Ourselves.Arthur Ripstein - 2009 - In Force and Freedom: Kant's Legal and Political Philosophy. Harvard University Press. pp. 182-231.
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    Practical Rationality and Preference: Essays for David Gauthier.Christopher W. Morris & Arthur Ripstein (eds.) - 2001 - Cambridge University Press.
    What are preferences and are they reasons for action? Is it rational to cooperate with others even if that entails acting against one's preferences? The dominant position in philosophy on the topic of practical rationality is that one acts so as to maximize the satisfaction of one's preferences. This view is most closely associated with the work of David Gauthier, and in this collection of essays some of the most innovative philosophers working in this field explore the controversies surrounding Gauthier's (...)
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  35. Preface.Arthur Ripstein - 2009 - In Force and Freedom: Kant's Legal and Political Philosophy. Harvard University Press.
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  36.  30
    Ronald Dworkin.Arthur Ripstein (ed.) - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    Ronald Dworkin occupies a distinctive place in both public life and philosophy. In public life, he is a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books and other widely read journals. In philosophy, he has written important and influential works on many of the most prominent issues in legal and political philosophy. In both cases, his interventions have in part shaped the debates he joined. His opposition to Robert Bork's nomination for the United States Supreme Court gave new centrality (...)
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  37.  42
    Arthur Ripstein, Force and Freedom: Kant's Legal and Political Philosophy.Richard Arneson - manuscript
    In this excellent book Arthur Ripstein develops a broadly Kantian interpretation of tort law and criminal law that is noteworthy for its spirited defense of core features of Anglo-American law and for its uncompromising dismissal of the so-called law and economics approach to these matters. A final chapter extends the analysis to the topic of distributive justice.
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  38.  44
    Presupposition, Aggregation, and Leibniz’s Argument for a Plurality of Substances.Richard T. W. Arthur - 2011 - The Leibniz Review 21:91-115.
    This paper consists in a study of Leibniz’s argument for the infinite plurality of substances, versions of which recur throughout his mature corpus. It goes roughly as follows: since every body is actually divided into further bodies, it is therefore not a unity but an infinite aggregate; the reality of an aggregate, however, reduces to the reality of the unities it presupposes; the reality of body, therefore, entails an actual infinity of constituent unities everywhere in it. I argue that this (...)
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  39.  84
    Leibniz's Theory of Space.Richard T. W. Arthur - 2013 - Foundations of Science 18 (3):499-528.
    In this paper I offer a fresh interpretation of Leibniz’s theory of space, in which I explain the connection of his relational theory to both his mathematical theory of analysis situs and his theory of substance. I argue that the elements of his mature theory are not bare bodies (as on a standard relationalist view) nor bare points (as on an absolutist view), but situations. Regarded as an accident of an individual body, a situation is the complex of its angles (...)
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  40. Leibniz's Syncategorematic Infinitesimals, Smooth Infinitesimal Analysis, and Newton's Proposition.Richard Arthur - manuscript
    In contrast with some recent theories of infinitesimals as non-Archimedean entities, Leibniz’s mature interpretation was fully in accord with the Archimedean Axiom: infinitesimals are fictions, whose treatment as entities incomparably smaller than finite quantities is justifiable wholly in terms of variable finite quantities that can be taken as small as desired, i.e. syncategorematically. In this paper I explain this syncategorematic interpretation, and how Leibniz used it to justify the calculus. I then compare it with the approach of Smooth Infinitesimal Analysis (...)
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  41.  2
    Leibniz’s Causal Theory of Time Revisited.Richard T. W. Arthur - 2016 - The Leibniz Review 26:151-178.
    Following the lead of Hans Reichenbach in the early twentieth century, many authors have attributed a causal theory of time to Leibniz. My exposition of Leibniz’s theory of time in a paper of 1985 has been interpreted as a version of such a causal theory, even though I was critical of the idea that Leibniz would have tried to reduce relations among monadic states to causal relations holding only among phenomena. Since that time previously unpublished texts by Leibniz have become (...)
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  42. From Actuals to Fictions: Four Phases in Leibniz's Early Thought on Infinitesimals.Richard Arthur - manuscript
    In this paper I attempt to trace the development of Gottfried Leibniz’s early thought on the status of the actually infinitely small in relation to the continuum. I argue that before he arrived at his mature interpretation of infinitesimals as fictions, he had advocated their existence as actually existing entities in the continuum. From among his early attempts on the continuum problem I distinguish four distinct phases in his interpretation of infinitesimals: (i) (1669) the continuum consists of assignable points separated (...)
     
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  43.  49
    I. Labour: Marx's Concrete Universal.C. J. Arthur - 1978 - Inquiry 21 (1-4):87 – 103.
    This contribution to the debate over Marx's theory of value gives an account of his concept of ?abstract labour?. Contrary to Stanley Moore {Inquiry, Vol. 14 [1971]), Marx never abandons his early critique of the Hegelian ?Concept'; for he gives a material basis to the conception of social labour as concretely universal. If, in analysing the commodity form of the product of labour, Marx characterizes the labour that forms the substance of value as ?abstractly universal labour?, the priority of the (...)
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  44. On Newton's Fluxional Proof of the Vector Addition of Motive Forces.Richard Arthur - manuscript
    This paper consists in an exposition of a proof Newton gave in 1666 of the parallelogram law for compounding velocities, and an examination of its implications for understanding his treatment of motion resulting from a continuously acting force in the Principia. I argue that the “moments” invoked in the fluxional proof of the vector resolution and composition of velocities are “virtual times”, a device allowing Newton to represent motions by the linear displacements produced in such a time; the ratio of (...)
     
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  45.  2
    Beeckman's Discrete Moments and Descartes' Disdain.Richard T. W. Arthur - 2011 - Intellectual History Review 22 (1):69-90.
    Descartes' allusions, in the Meditations and the Principles, to the individual moments of duration, has for some years stirred controversy over whether this commits him to a kind of time atomism. The origins of Descartes' way of treating moments as least intervals of duration can be traced back to his early collaboration with Isaac Beeckman. Where Beeckman (in 1618) conceived of moments as (mathematically divisible) physical indivisibles, corresponding to the durations of uniform motions between successive impacts on a body by (...)
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    How Do You Know God's Your Father?Kay Arthur - 2001 - Waterbrook Press.
    Each book in the series includes six 40-minute studies designed to draw you into God’s Word through basic inductive Bible study.
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  47. Presupposition, Aggregation, and Leibniz’s Argument for a Plurality of Substances.Richard T. W. Arthur - 2011 - The Leibniz Review 21:91-115.
    This paper consists in a study of Leibniz’s argument for the infinite plurality of substances, versions of which recur throughout his mature corpus. It goes roughly as follows: since every body is actually divided into further bodies, it is therefore not a unity but an infinite aggregate; the reality of an aggregate, however, reduces to the reality of the unities it presupposes; the reality of body, therefore, entails an actual infinity of constituent unities everywhere in it. I argue that this (...)
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  48.  41
    Arthur Ripstein, Force and Freedom: Kant's Legal and Political Philosophy. [REVIEW]Kyla Ebels-Duggan - 2011 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 41 (4):549-573.
  49.  75
    Innate Right and Acquired Right in Arthur Ripstein's Force and Freedom.Katrin Flikschuh - 2010 - Jurisprudence 1 (2):295-304.
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    Arthur Ripstein, Force and Freedom: Kant's Legal and Political Philosophy. [REVIEW]Stephen Darwall - 2013 - Legal Theory 19 (1):89-99.
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