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  1.  37
    Lewis and Sylvan on Noneism.Arthur Witherall - 2000 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 58 (1):181-202.
    In his paper "Noneism or Allism" David Lewis argued that Richard Sylvan's rehabilitation of Meinong's theory of objects was not a noneist one but rather an allist, that is, that all objects whatsoever actually exist and thus Meinong and Sylvan are among the greatest "entity-multipliers". But this is exactly what Sylvan tried to show is not the case. I'll argue that Lewis' attack ultimately fails in re-instating an old serious misinterpretation of Meinongian metaphysics. In doing so he deflects attention away (...)
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  2. The Problem of Existence.Arthur Witherall - 2002 - Ashgate.
     
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  3.  63
    The Fundamental Question.Arthur Witherall - 2001 - Journal of Philosophical Research 26:53-87.
    Asking the question “Why is there something instead of nothing?” almost always inspires a reaction of awe or wonder. This emotional response is both appropriate and desirable, whether or not a legitimate answer to the question is obtainable. The question is deep, and the fact about which it asks is impossible to explain by citing some other fact or some antecedent condition. In this paper I consider several possible responses, including a rejection of the question as meaningless, positions that posit (...)
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  4.  46
    Meinongian Metaphysics and Subjectivity.Arthur Witherall - 1998 - Journal of Philosophical Research 23:29-49.
    Meinongian metaphysics uses “exists” as a genuine predicate, which entails that there are some objects that do not exist. The formal details of this position have been elucidated by several authors, but the question of how to explicate the predicate has received less attention. This paper examines Panayot Butchvarov’s thesis that existence is power, which is deduced from an argument that begins with the knowability of existent objects. It is argued that this account presupposes the thinking subject, and that when (...)
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  5. The Zero Ontology - David Pearce on Why Anything Exists.Arthur Witherall - unknown
    David Pearce has described a proposal which outlines an explanation space within which the question "Why is there something instead of nothing? " can be given a legitimate answer. This is how he describes his endeavour, and he makes it clear that his ideas are purely speculative. He does not have a straightforward answer to the question, nor even a theory. All that he has is a sketch of what a theory which "explains existence" might be like, and how it (...)
     
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  6.  9
    Meinongian Metaphysics and Subjectivity.Arthur Witherall - 1998 - Journal of Philosophical Research 23:29-49.
    Meinongian metaphysics uses “exists” as a genuine predicate, which entails that there are some objects that do not exist. The formal details of this position have been elucidated by several authors, but the question of how to explicate the predicate has received less attention. This paper examines Panayot Butchvarov’s thesis that existence is power, which is deduced from an argument that begins with the knowability of existent objects. It is argued that this account presupposes the thinking subject, and that when (...)
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  7.  9
    The Value of Truth and the Care of the Soul.Arthur Witherall - 1996 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 13 (2):189-198.
    Although the argument against the neo‐Darwinian theory of evolution presented by Stephen R. L. Clark in From Athens to Jerusalem is based upon sound principles, it fails to provide an a priori refutation. If it did work, it would refute all objective scientific theories, since all of them make consciousness and subjectivity, as Clark characterises them, incomprehensible. Scientism, the thesis that science is the only source of truth, is Clark's real target, rather than science per se, but he does not (...)
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  8.  2
    The Fundamental Question.Arthur Witherall - 2001 - Journal of Philosophical Research 26:53-87.
    Asking the question “Why is there something instead of nothing?” almost always inspires a reaction of awe or wonder. This emotional response is both appropriate and desirable, whether or not a legitimate answer to the question is obtainable. The question is deep, and the fact about which it asks is impossible to explain by citing some other fact or some antecedent condition. In this paper I consider several possible responses, including a rejection of the question as meaningless, positions that posit (...)
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