Results for 'Artificial speech'

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  1.  39
    Artificial Speech and Its Authors.Philip J. Nickel - 2013 - Minds and Machines 23 (4):489-502.
    Some of the systems used in natural language generation (NLG), a branch of applied computational linguistics, have the capacity to create or assemble somewhat original messages adapted to new contexts. In this paper, taking Bernard Williams’ account of assertion by machines as a starting point, I argue that NLG systems meet the criteria for being speech actants to a substantial degree. They are capable of authoring original messages, and can even simulate illocutionary force and speaker meaning. Background intelligence embedded (...)
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  2. How Many Mechanisms Are Needed to Analyze Speech? A Connectionist Simulation of Structural Rule Learning in Artificial Language Acquisition.Aarre Laakso & Paco Calvo - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (7):1243-1281.
    Some empirical evidence in the artificial language acquisition literature has been taken to suggest that statistical learning mechanisms are insufficient for extracting structural information from an artificial language. According to the more than one mechanism (MOM) hypothesis, at least two mechanisms are required in order to acquire language from speech: (a) a statistical mechanism for speech segmentation; and (b) an additional rule-following mechanism in order to induce grammatical regularities. In this article, we present a set of (...)
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  3.  13
    Reducing Speech Collisions by Using an Artificial Subtle Expression in a Decelerated Human-Robot Spoken Dialogue.Kotaro Funakoshi, Kazuki Kobayashi, Mikio Nakano, Takanori Komatsu & Seiji Yamada - 2011 - Transactions of the Japanese Society for Artificial Intelligence 26:353-365.
  4. AA. W., Speech Understanding Systems, Final Report of a Study Group, North-Holland/American Elsevier, 1973. Artificial and Human Thinking, Ed. By A. Elithorn and D. Jones, Elsevier Publ. Comp., 1973. K. Atanasijevic, The Metaphysical and Geometrical Doctrine of Bruno, Trad. D. [REVIEW]A. Dumitriu & Editura Academieii Republicii Socialiste Romania - 1974 - International Logic Review: Rassegna Internazionale di Logica 7 (9-12):154.
  5.  74
    Artificial Intelligence: New Jobs From Old.Jay Liebowitz - 1989 - AI and Society 3 (1):61-70.
    The age of artificial intelligence (AI) is upon us, and its effect upon society in the coming years will be noteworthy. Artificial intelligence is a field that encompasses such applications as robotics, expert systems, natural language understanding, speech recognition, and computer vision. The effect of these AI systems upon existing and future job occupations will be important. This paper takes a look at artificial intelligence in terms of the creation of new job categories. Also, the introduction (...)
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  6.  17
    Dimension‐Based Statistical Learning Affects Both Speech Perception and Production.Matthew Lehet & Lori L. Holt - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (S4):885-912.
    Multiple acoustic dimensions signal speech categories. However, dimensions vary in their informativeness; some are more diagnostic of category membership than others. Speech categorization reflects these dimensional regularities such that diagnostic dimensions carry more “perceptual weight” and more effectively signal category membership to native listeners. Yet perceptual weights are malleable. When short-term experience deviates from long-term language norms, such as in a foreign accent, the perceptual weight of acoustic dimensions in signaling speech category membership rapidly adjusts. The present (...)
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  7. Speech Acts.Mitchell Green - 2010 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Speech acts are a staple of everyday communicative life, but only became a topic of sustained investigation, at least in the English-speaking world, in the middle of the Twentieth Century.[1] Since that time “speech act theory” has been influential not only within philosophy, but also in linguistics, psychology, legal theory, artificial intelligence, literary theory and many other scholarly disciplines.[2] Recognition of the importance of speech acts has illuminated the ability of language to do other things than (...)
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  8. There's No Such Thing as Free Speech: And It's a Good Thing, Too.Stanley Fish - 1994 - Oxford University Press USA.
    In an era when much of what passes for debate is merely moral posturing--traditional family values versus the cultural elite, free speech versus censorship--or reflexive name-calling--the terms "liberal" and "politically correct," are used with as much dismissive scorn by the right as "reactionary" and "fascist" are by the left--Stanley Fish would seem an unlikely lightning rod for controversy. A renowned scholar of Milton, head of the English Department of Duke University, Fish has emerged as a brilliantly original critic of (...)
     
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  9.  10
    Spontaneous Emergence of Language-Like and Music-Like Vocalizations From an Artificial Protolanguage.Weiyi Ma, Anna Fiveash & William Forde Thompson - 2019 - Semiotica 2019 (229):1-23.
    How did human vocalizations come to acquire meaning in the evolution of our species? Charles Darwin proposed that language and music originated from a common emotional signal system based on the imitation and modification of sounds in nature. This protolanguage is thought to have diverged into two separate systems, with speech prioritizing referential functionality and music prioritizing emotional functionality. However, there has never been an attempt to empirically evaluate the hypothesis that a single communication system can split into two (...)
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  10.  18
    Conventionalisation and Discrimination as Competing Pressures on Continuous Speech-Like Signals.Hannah Little, Kerem Eryılmaz & Bart de Boer - 2017 - Interaction Studies 18 (3):352-375.
    Arbitrary communication systems can emerge from iconic beginnings through processes of conventionalisation via interaction. Here, we explore whether this process of conventionalisation occurs with continuous, auditory signals. We conducted an artificial signalling experiment. Participants either created signals for themselves, or for a partner in a communication game. We found no evidence that the speech-like signals in our experiment became less iconic or simpler through interaction. We hypothesise that the reason for our results is that when it is difficult (...)
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  11. Meaning and Speech Acts: Volume 1, Principles of Language Use.Daniel Vanderveken - 1990 - Cambridge University Press.
    The primary units of meaning in the use and comprehension of language are speech acts of the type called illocutionary acts. In Foundations of Illocutionary Logic John Searle and Daniel Vanderveken presented the first formalized logic of a general theory of speech acts. In Meaning and Speech Acts Daniel Vanderveken further develops the logic of speech acts and the logic of propositions to construct a general semantic theory of natural languages. Volume I, Principles of Language Use, (...)
     
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  12. Meaning and Speech Acts: Volume 2, Formal Semantics of Success and Satisfaction.Daniel Vanderveken - 2009 - Cambridge University Press.
    The primary units of meaning in the use and comprehension of language are speech acts of the type called illocutionary acts. In Foundations of Illocutionary Logic John Searle and Daniel Vanderveken presented the first formalized logic of a general theory of speech acts. In Meaning and Speech Acts Daniel Vanderveken further develops the logic of speech acts and the logic of propositions to construct a general semantic theory of natural languages. Volume I, Principles of Language Use, (...)
     
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  13. Meaning and Speech Acts 2 Volume Paperback Set.Daniel Vanderveken - 2009 - Cambridge University Press.
    The primary units of meaning in the use and comprehension of language are speech acts of the type called illocutionary acts. In Foundations of Illocutionary Logic John Searle and Daniel Vanderveken presented the first formalised logic of a general theory of speech acts. In Meaning and Speech Acts Daniel Vanderveken further develops the logic of speech acts and the logic of propositions to construct a general semantic theory of natural languages. Volume I, Principles of Language Use, (...)
     
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  14.  7
    Voice, Gesture and Working Memory in the Emergence of Speech.Francisco Aboitiz - 2018 - Interaction Studies: Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 19 (1-2):70-85.
    Language and speech depend on a relatively well defined neural circuitry, located predominantly in the left hemisphere. In this article, I discuss the origin of the speech circuit in early humans, as an expansion of an auditory-vocal articulatory network that took place after the last common ancestor with the chimpanzee. I will attempt to converge this perspective with aspects of the Mirror System Hypothesis, particularly those related to the emergence of a meaningful grammar in human communication. Basically, the (...)
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  15.  54
    How to Make and Defend a Proposal in a Deliberation Dialogue.Douglas Walton - 2006 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 14 (3):177-239.
    In this paper it is shown how tools developed in argumentation theory and artificial intelligence can be applied to the development of a new dialectical analysis of the speech act of making a proposal in a deliberation dialogue. These tools are developed, modified and used to formulate dialogue pre-conditions, defining conditions and post-conditions for the speech act of making a proposal in a deliberation dialogue. The defining conditions set out what is required for a move in a (...)
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  16.  12
    Mindful Tutors: Linguistic Choice and Action Demonstration in Speech to Infants and a Simulated Robot.Kerstin Fischer, Kilian Foth, Katharina J. Rohlfing & Britta Wrede - 2011 - Interaction Studiesinteraction Studies Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 12 (1):134-161.
    It has been proposed that the design of robots might benefit from interactions that are similar to caregiver–child interactions, which is tailored to children’s respective capacities to a high degree. However, so far little is known about how people adapt their tutoring behaviour to robots and whether robots can evoke input that is similar to child-directed interaction. The paper presents detailed analyses of speakers’ linguistic behaviour and non-linguistic behaviour, such as action demonstration, in two comparable situations: In one experiment, parents (...)
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  17.  5
    Infant-Directed Visual Prosody: Mothers’ Head Movements and Speech Acoustics.Nicholas A. Smith & Heather L. Strader - 2014 - Interaction Studiesinteraction Studies Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 15 (1):38-54.
    Acoustical changes in the prosody of mothers’ speech to infants are distinct and near universal. However, less is known about the visible properties of mothers’ infant-directed speech, and their relation to speech acoustics. Mothers’ head movements were tracked as they interacted with their infants using ID speech, and compared to movements accompanying their adult-directed speech. Movement measures along three dimensions of head translation, and three axes of head rotation were calculated. Overall, more head movement was (...)
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  18. Gesture–Speech Combinations and Early Verbal Abilities.Micaela Capobianco, Elena Antinoro Pizzuto & Antonella Devescovi - 2017 - Interaction Studies: Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 18 (1):55-76.
    This study provides new longitudinal evidence on two major types of gesture–speech combination that play different roles in children’s early language. We analysed the spontaneous production of 10 Italian children observed monthly from 10–12 to 23–25 months of age. We evaluated the extent to which the developmental trends observed in children’s early gesture–word and word–word productions can predict subsequent verbal abilities. The results indicate that “complementary” and “supplementary” gesture–speech combinations predict subsequent language development in a different manner: While (...)
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  19.  40
    Participant Roles, Frames, and Speech Acts.James D. Mccawley - 1999 - Linguistics and Philosophy 22 (6):595-619.
  20.  20
    What is the Appropriate Speech Rate for a Communication Robot?Michihiro Shimada & Takayuki Kanda - 2012 - Interaction Studiesinteraction Studies Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 13 (3):408-435.
    This study investigates the influence of a robot’s speech rate. In human communication, slow speech is considered boring, speech at normal speed is perceived as credible, and fast speech is perceived as competent. To seek the appropriate speech rate for robots, we test whether these tendencies are replicated in human-robot interaction by conducting an experiment with four rates of speech: fast, normal, moderately slow, and slow. Our experimental results reveal a rather surprising trend. Participants (...)
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  21.  44
    Japanese Reported Speech: Against a Direct--Indirect Distinction.Emar Maier - 2009 - In Hattori et al (ed.), New Frontiers in Artificial Intelligence. Springer. pp. 133--145.
    English direct discourse is easily recognized by e.g. the lack of a complementizer, the quotation marks (or the intonational contour they induce), and verbatim (`shifted') pronouns. Japanese employs the same complementizer for all reports, does not have a consistent intonational quotation marking, and tends to drop pronouns where possible. Some have argued that this just shows many Japanese reports are ambiguous: despite the lack of explicit marking, the underlying distinction is just as hard. On the basis of a number of (...)
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  22.  2
    Changes in Infant-Directed Speech and Song Are Related to Preterm Infant Facial Expression in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.Manuela Filippa, Maya Gratier, Emmanuel Devouche & Didier Grandjean - 2018 - Interaction Studies: Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 19 (3):427-444.
    In their first weeks of life preterm infants are deprived of developmentally appropriate stimuli, including their mother’s voice. The current study explores the immediate association of two preterm infant behaviours with the quality of a mother’s infant-directed speech and singing. Participants are 20 mothers who are asked to speak and sing to their medically stable infants placed in incubators. Eighty-four vocal samples are extracted when they occur in the presence of an infant’s behavioural display and compared with random selections (...)
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  23.  26
    Diego Marconi, Lexical Competence, Language, Speech and Communication Series.Francesco Orilia - 2000 - Minds and Machines 10 (3):452-455.
  24. A Sociobiological Account of Indirect Speech.Viviana Masia - 2017 - Interaction Studies: Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 18 (1):142-160.
    Indirect speech is a remarkable trait of human communication. The present paper tackles the sociobiological underpinnings of communicative indirectness discussing both socio-interactional and cognitive rationales behind its manifestation in discourse. From a social perspective, the use of indirect forms in interactions can be regarded as an adaptive response to the epistemic implications of transacted new information in small primary groups, representing – in Givón’s terms – our “bio-cultural” descent. The design features of indirect strategies today may therefore be explained (...)
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  25.  5
    Are We There Yet?Nello Cristianini - 2010 - Neural Networks 23 (4):466-470.
    Statistical approaches to Artificial Intelligence are behind most success stories of the field in the past decade. The idea of generating non-trivial behaviour by analysing vast amounts of data has enabled recommendation systems, search engines, spam filters, optical character recognition, machine translation and speech recognition, among other things. As we celebrate the spectacular achievements of this line of research, we need to assess its full potential and its limitations. What are the next steps to take towards machine intelligence?
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  26.  18
    A Preliminary Study of Speech Prosody-Based Relationship with HDS-R Scores.Shohei Kato, Yuta Suzuki, Akiko Kobayashi, Toshiaki Kojima, Hidenori Itoh & Akira Homma - 2011 - Transactions of the Japanese Society for Artificial Intelligence 26:347-352.
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  27.  3
    Grounding Symbols in the Physics of Speech Communication.Simon F. Worgan & Robert I. Damper - 2007 - Interaction Studies: Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 8 (1):7-30.
  28.  6
    Intra- and Inter-Personal Coordination of Speech, Gesture and Breathing Movements.Koji Hayashi, Nobuhiro Furuyama & Hiroki Takase - 2005 - Transactions of the Japanese Society for Artificial Intelligence 20:247-258.
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  29.  3
    First in, Last Out?: The Evolution of Aphasic Lexical Speech Automatisms to Agrammatism and the Evolution of Human Communication.Chris Code - 2005 - Interaction Studies: Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 6 (2):311-334.
  30.  2
    The Frame/Content Theory of Evolution of Speech: A Comparison with a Gestural-Origins Alternative.Peter F. MacNeilage & Barbara L. Davis - 2005 - Interaction Studies: Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 6 (2):173-199.
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  31.  2
    Building a Talking Baby Robot: A Contribution to the Study of Speech Acquisition and Evolution.Jihène Serkhane, Jean-Luc Schwartz & Pierre Bessière - 2005 - Interaction Studies: Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 6 (2):253-286.
  32.  61
    Neural Networks Discover a Near-Identity Relation to Distinguish Simple Syntactic Forms.Thomas R. Shultz & Alan C. Bale - 2006 - Minds and Machines 16 (2):107-139.
    Computer simulations show that an unstructured neural-network model [Shultz, T. R., & Bale, A. C. (2001). Infancy, 2, 501–536] covers the essential features␣of infant learning of simple grammars in an artificial language [Marcus, G. F., Vijayan, S., Bandi Rao, S., & Vishton, P. M. (1999). Science, 283, 77–80], and generalizes to examples both outside and inside of the range of training sentences. Knowledge-representation analyses confirm that these networks discover that duplicate words in the sentences are nearly identical and that (...)
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  33.  22
    Detecting Robot-Directed Speech by Situated Understanding in Physical Interaction.Xiang Zuo, Naoto Iwahashi, Kotaro Funakoshi, Mikio Nakano, Ryo Taguchi, Shigeki Matsuda, Komei Sugiura & Natsuki Oka - 2010 - Transactions of the Japanese Society for Artificial Intelligence 25:670-682.
  34.  27
    John Langshaw Austin.Federica Berdini & Claudia Bianchi - 2013
    J. L. Austin was one of the more influential British philosophers of his time, due to his rigorous thought, extraordinary personality, and innovative philosophical method. According to John Searle, he was both passionately loved and hated by his contemporaries. Like Socrates, he seemed to destroy all philosophical orthodoxy without presenting an alternative, equally comforting, orthodoxy. -/- Austin is best known for two major contributions to contemporary philosophy: first, his ‘linguistic phenomenology’, a peculiar method of philosophical analysis of the concepts and (...)
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  35.  28
    Consideration of Infants' Vocal Imitation Through Modeling Speech as Timbre-Based Melody.Nobuaki Minematsu & Tazuko Nishimura - 2008 - In Satoh (ed.), New Frontiers in Artificial Intelligence. Springer. pp. 26--39.
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  36.  3
    Speech Synthesis for Conversational News Contents Delivery会話によるニュース記事伝達のための音声合成.Hiroaki Takatsu, Ishin Fukuoka, Shinya Fujie, Kazuhiko Iwata & Tetsunori Kobayashi - 2019 - Transactions of the Japanese Society for Artificial Intelligence 34 (2):B-I65_1-15.
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  37.  11
    Identifying the Addressee Using Head Orientation and Speech Information in Multiparty Human-Agent Conversations.Naoya Baba, Hung-Hsuan Huang & Yukiko Nakano - 2013 - Transactions of the Japanese Society for Artificial Intelligence 28 (2):149-159.
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  38.  13
    Interactions Between a Quiz Robot and Multiple Participants: Focusing on Speech, Gaze and Bodily Conduct in Japanese and English Speakers.Akiko Yamazaki, Keiichi Yamazaki, Keiko Ikeda, Matthew Burdelski, Mihoko Fukushima, Tomoyuki Suzuki, Miyuki Kurihara, Yoshinori Kuno & Yoshinori Kobayashi - 2013 - Interaction Studies: Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 14 (3):366-389.
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  39.  6
    A Development of a System Enables Character Input and PC Operation Via Voice for a Physically Disabled Person with a Speech Impediment.Toshimasa Tanioka, Hiroyuki Egashira, Mayumi Takata, Yasuhisa Okazaki, Kenzi Watanabe & Hiroki Kondo - 2008 - Transactions of the Japanese Society for Artificial Intelligence 23:447-456.
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  40.  5
    A Measure of Speech and Pitch Reliability From Voicing.Hervé Glotin, Frédéric Berthommier & F. Klassner - 1999 - Proc. Int. Joint Conf. On Artificial Intelligence (Ijcai):61-70.
  41.  5
    Time–Frequency Analysis of Vietnamese Speech Inspired on Chirp Auditory Selectivity.Ha Nguyen & Luis Weruaga - 2008 - In Tu-Bao Ho & Zhi-Hua Zhou (eds.), Pricai 2008: Trends in Artificial Intelligence. Springer. pp. 284--295.
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  42. Speech-to-Gesture Generation Using Bi-Directional LSTM NetworkBi-Directional LSTM Networkを用いた発話に伴うジェスチャの自動生成手法.Naoshi Kaneko, Kenta Takeuchi, Dai Hasegawa, Shinichi Shirakawa, Hiroshi Sakuta & Kazuhiko Sumi - 2019 - Transactions of the Japanese Society for Artificial Intelligence 34 (6):C-J41_1-12.
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  43. Insensitive Semantics: A Defense of Semantic Minimalism and Speech Act Pluralism.Herman Cappelen & Ernest Lepore - 2005 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    _Insensitive Semantics_ is an overview of and contribution to the debates about how to accommodate context sensitivity within a theory of human communication, investigating the effects of context on communicative interaction and, as a corollary, what a context of utterance is and what it is to be in one. Provides detailed and wide-ranging overviews of the central positions and arguments surrounding contextualism Addresses broad and varied aspects of the distinction between the semantic and non-semantic content of language Defends a distinctive (...)
  44. Future Progress in Artificial Intelligence: A Survey of Expert Opinion.Vincent C. Müller & Nick Bostrom - 2016 - In Vincent Müller (ed.), Fundamental Issues of Artificial Intelligence. Springer. pp. 553-571.
    There is, in some quarters, concern about high–level machine intelligence and superintelligent AI coming up in a few decades, bringing with it significant risks for humanity. In other quarters, these issues are ignored or considered science fiction. We wanted to clarify what the distribution of opinions actually is, what probability the best experts currently assign to high–level machine intelligence coming up within a particular time–frame, which risks they see with that development, and how fast they see these developing. We thus (...)
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  45. Speech Acts: The Contemporary Theoretical Landscape.Daniel W. Harris, Daniel Fogal & Matt Moss - 2018 - In Daniel Fogal, Matt Moss & Daniel Harris (eds.), New Work on Speech Acts. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    What makes it the case that an utterance constitutes an illocutionary act of a given kind? This is the central question of speech-act theory. Answers to it—i.e., theories of speech acts—have proliferated. Our main goal in this chapter is to clarify the logical space into which these different theories fit. -/- We begin, in Section 1, by dividing theories of speech acts into five families, each distinguished from the others by its account of the key ingredients in (...)
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  46. AAAI: An Argument Against Artificial Intelligence.Sander Beckers - 2017 - In Vincent Müller (ed.), Philosophy and theory of artificial intelligence 2017. Berlin: Springer. pp. 235-247.
    The ethical concerns regarding the successful development of an Artificial Intelligence have received a lot of attention lately. The idea is that even if we have good reason to believe that it is very unlikely, the mere possibility of an AI causing extreme human suffering is important enough to warrant serious consideration. Others look at this problem from the opposite perspective, namely that of the AI itself. Here the idea is that even if we have good reason to believe (...)
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  47. A Kantian Conception of Free Speech.Helga Varden - 2010 - In Deidre Golash (ed.), Free Speech in a Diverse World. Springer.
    In this paper I provide an interpretation of Kant’s conception of free speech. Free speech is understood as the kind of speech that is constitutive of interaction respectful of everybody’s right to freedom, and it requires what we with John Rawls may call ‘public reason’. Public reason so understood refers to how the public authority must reason in order to properly specify the political relation between citizens. My main aim is to give us some reasons for taking (...)
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  48. Inner Speech: New Voices -- Introduction.Peter Langland-Hassan & Agustin Vicente - 2018 - In Peter Langland-Hassan & Agustin Vicente (eds.), Inner Speech: New Voices. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    This is the introductory chapter to the anthology: Inner Speech: New Voices, to be published in fall 2018 by OUP. It gives an overview of current debates in philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience concerning inner speech, and situates the chapters of the volume with respect to those debates.
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  49. Subordinating Speech.Ishani Maitra - 2012 - In Mary Kate McGowan Ishani Maitra (ed.), Speech and Harm: Controversies Over Free Speech. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 94-120.
    This chapter considers whether ordinary instances of racist hate speech can be authoritative, thereby constituting the subordination of people of color. It is often said that ordinary speakers cannot subordinate because they lack authority. Here it is argued that there are more ways in which speakers can come to have authority than have been generally recognized. In part, this is because authority has been taken to be too closely tied to social position. This chapter presents a series of examples (...)
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  50.  21
    Search Engines, Free Speech Coverage, and the Limits of Analogical Reasoning.Heather Whitney & Robert Mark Simpson - 2019 - In Susan Brison & Katharine Gelber (eds.), Free Speech in the Digital Age. pp. 33-41.
    This paper investigates whether search engines and other new modes of online communication should be covered by free speech principles. It criticizes the analogical reason-ing that contemporary American courts and scholars have used to liken search engines to newspapers, and to extend free speech coverage to them based on that likeness. There are dissimilarities between search engines and newspapers that undermine the key analogy, and also rival analogies that can be drawn which don’t recommend free speech protection (...)
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