Results for 'Arts, Japanese'

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  1. Contrastive Rhetoric: A Case of Nominalization in Japanese and English Discourse Senko K. Maynard.A. Case of Nominalization In Japanese - 1996 - In Katarzyna Jaszczolt & Ken Turner (eds.), Contrastive Semantics and Pragmatics. Pergamon Press. pp. 933-946.
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  2. Working the Miracle of the Twentieth Century: The Seven Elements of Japanese Strength. By Willard O. Eddy. [REVIEW]A. Japanese - 1939 - Ethics 50:233.
     
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  3. Japanese Martial Arts and American Sports the Historical and Cultural Background on Teaching Methods : Proceedings of the 1996 United States-Japan Conference.Minoru Kiyota & Hiroshi Sawamura - 1998 - Nihon University.
     
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  4. Four Approaches to Emotion in Japanese Visual Arts.Mara Miller - 2004 - In Paolo Santangelo (ed.), Emotion in Asia. Universita degli Studi di Napoli "L'Orientale.
  5.  19
    The Japanese Arts and Self-Cultivation (Review).Sor-Ching Low - 2010 - Philosophy East and West 60 (1):pp. 123-125.
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    The Construction and Export of Culture as Artefact: The Case of Japanese Marital Arts.Stephen Chan - 2000 - Body and Society 6 (1):69-74.
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    Kime and the Moving Body: Somatic Codes in Japanese Martial Arts.Einat Bar-On Cohen - 2006 - Body and Society 12 (4):73-93.
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  8.  2
    The Japanese Arts and Self-Cultivation.Sor-Ching Low - 2010 - Philosophy East and West 60 (1):123-125.
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  9. Kime in Japanese Martial Arts and the Moving Body.Einat Bar-On Cohen - 2006 - Body and Society 12 (4):73-93.
     
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  10. Sugihara Takeo. Aristoteles Ni Okeru Tokusyó to Huteisyó . Japanese with English Summary. Memoirs of the Liberal Arts College, Fukui University, Vol. 3 , Pp. 77–86. [REVIEW]I. M. Bocheński - 1955 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 20 (2):172.
  11. The Arts of the Japanese Sword.Schuyler V. R. Cammann & B. W. Robinson - 1962 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 82 (1):131.
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  12. Review of The Japanese Arts and Self-Cultivation, by Robert E. Carter. [REVIEW]Low Sor-Ching - 2010 - Philosophy East and West 60 (1):123-125.
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  13. Introduction: Japanese Arts and Aesthetic Education.Akio Okazaki & K. Nakamura - 2003 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 37 (4):1-2.
     
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  14. Beauty in the Pine: Creative Expressiveness of the Pine in Japanese Aesthetics.Sonja Servomaa - 2007 - Yliopistopaino, Helsinki Univ. Press.
     
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  15.  5
    Religious Art and Meditative Contemplation in Japanese Calligraphy and Byzantine Iconography.Rodica Frentiu - 2014 - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 13 (38):110-136.
    Far Eastern calligraphy has always been regarded by the Occident as an “esoteric” issue, laden with a peculiar “mysticism,” which presents spiritual and philosophical aspects too outlandish to truly comprehend. That is probably the reason why calligraphy was amongst the last artistic “disciplines” to gain access to the international world of the arts. This study focuses on Japanese calligraphy as a visual and verbal image, conducting a hermeneutic investigation into the nature and function of this type of image, into (...)
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  16. Zen and Japanese Culture.Daisetz T. Suzuki & Richard M. Jaffe - 1959 - Princeton University Press.
    Zen and Japanese Culture is one of the twentieth century's leading works on Zen, and a valuable source for those wishing to understand its concepts in the context of Japanese life and art. In simple, often poetic, language, Daisetz Suzuki describes his conception of Zen and its historical evolution. He connects Zen to the philosophy of the samurai, and subtly portrays the relationship between Zen and swordsmanship, haiku, tea ceremonies, and the Japanese love of nature. Suzuki's contemplative (...)
     
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  17.  3
    Studies of Japanese Society and Culture: Sociology and Cognate Disciplines in Hong Kong.Yin-Wah Chu - 2012 - Japanese Journal of Political Science 13 (2):201-221.
    This paper reviews the studies of Japanese society and culture undertaken by Hong Kong-based sociologists and scholars in related disciplines. It presents information on research projects funded by the Research Grants Council, Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI), and Arts and Humanities Citation Index (A&HCI) journal articles, authored and edited books, book chapters, non-SSCI and non-A&HCI journal articles, as well as master and doctoral theses written by scholars and graduate students associated with Hong Kong's major universities. It is found that (...)
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  18. "Cui" de Gou Zao.Shūzō Kuki - 2009 - Lian Jing Chu Ban Shi Ye Gu Fen You Xian Gong Si.
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  19.  7
    Literary and Art Theories in Japan.Makoto Ueda - 1967 - Center for Japanese Studies, University of Michigan.
  20.  11
    Nature Restoration Without Dissimulation: Learning From Japanese Gardens and Earthworks.Thomas Heyd - 2002 - Essays in Philosophy 3 (1):12.
    On the face of it, the expression "nature restoration" may seem an oxymoron, for one may ask whether it makes any sense to suppose that human beings could restore that which is not human. Several writers recently have argued that, strictly speaking, this is nonsense and, furthermore, that the conceptual confusion involved may lead to ethically problematic consequences. In this essay I begin by discussing the problematic perceived in the notion of nature restoration. I proceed to consider Japanese gardens (...)
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  21. Dentō Kōgei to Kansei Hyōka.Mina Ryōke - 2009 - Jaist Press.
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  22.  27
    Shinto Research and the Humanities in Japan.Kamata Toji - 2016 - Zygon 51 (1):43-62.
    Three approaches to scholarship are “scholarship as a way,” which aims at perfection of character; “scholarship as a method,” which clearly limits objects and methods in order to achieve precise perception and new knowledge; and “scholarship as an expression,” which takes various approaches to questions and inquiry. The “humanities” participate deeply and broadly in all three of these approaches. In relation to this view of the humanities, Japanese Shinto is a field of study that yields rich results. As a (...)
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    Mushin, Morals, and Martial Arts: A Discussion of Keenan's Yogācāra Critique.Stewart McFarlane - 1990 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 17 (4):397-420.
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    The Mystique of Martial Arts: A Reply to Professor Keenan's Response.Stewart McFarlane - 1991 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 18 (4):355-368.
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    ""Spontaneity in Western Martial Arts: A Yogācāra Critique of" Mushin"(No-Mind).John P. Keenan - 1989 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 16 (4):285-298.
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    Book Review: Joseph D. Parker, Zen Buddhist Landscape Arts of Early Muromachi Japan (1336-1573). [REVIEW]Stephen Addiss - 2001 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 28 (1-2):184-186.
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  27.  4
    Flowing Traces: Buddhism in the Literary and Visual Arts of Japan.Masatoshi Nagatomi, William R. LaFleur & James H. Sanford - 1993 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 20:73-77.
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  28.  4
    The Mystique of Martial Arts: A Response to Professor McFarlane.John P. Keenan - 1990 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 17 (4):421-432.
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  29. They Are Born to Play: Japanese Visual Entertainment From Nintendo to Mobile Phone.Machiko Kusahara - 2003 - Art Inquiry. Recherches Sur les Arts 5:111-154.
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  30. Toward Digital Biodiversity: Reading Japanese Digital Art in a Cultural Context.Machiko Kusahara - 2002 - Art Inquiry. Recherches Sur les Arts 4:249-270.
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  31. Review Of: James H. Sanford, William R. LaFleur, and Masatoshi Nagatomi, Eds., Flowing Traces: Buddhism in the Literary and Visual Arts of Japan. [REVIEW]Joseph O'leary - 1993 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 20 (1):73-77.
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  32. Ainu Aesthetics.Mara Miller & Koji Yamasaki - forthcoming - In Minh Nguyen (ed.), New Studies in Japanese Aesthetics. Lexington Books.
    Ainu artists were invited to make “replicas” of traditional Ainu arts held in an important museum collection and describe their choices, process and results. The resulting Ainu aesthetics challenges—and changes—our understanding of aesthetics and the philosophy of art, on four levels: descriptive aesthetics, categorical aesthetics (the categories through which the Ainu understand aesthetic value), implications of these aesthetics for a variety of human activities such as museum practice and daily life, and the implications of the first three for our broader (...)
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  33. How a Japanese Philosopher Encountered Bioethics.Masahiro Morioka - 2013 - In Frank Rövekamp & Friederike Bosse (eds.), Ethics in Science and Society: German and Japanese Views. IUDICIUM Verlag. pp. 27-41.
    In this essay I will illustrate how a Japanese philosopher reacted to a newly imported discipline, “bioethics,” in the 1980s and then tried to create an alternative way of looking at “life” in the field of philosophy. This essay might serve as an interesting case study in which a contemporary “western” way of thinking succeeded in capturing, but finally failed to persuade, a then-young Japanese researcher’s mind.
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    Epistemic Viciousness in the Martial Arts.Gillian Russell - 2010 - In Graham Priest & Damon Young (eds.), Martial Arts and Philosophy. Chicago and Lasalle, Illinois: Open Court. pp. 129-144.
    When I was eleven, my form teacher, Mr Howard, showed some of my class how to punch. We were waiting for the rest of the class to finish changing after gym, and he took a stance that I would now call shizentai yoi and snapped his right fist forward into a head-level straight punch, pulling his left back to his side at the same time. Then he punched with his left, pulling back on his right. We all lined up in (...)
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  35.  11
    The Concept of Yuko-Datotsu in Kendo: Interpreted From the Aesthetics of Zanshin.Yoshiko Oda & Yoshitaka Kondo - 2014 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 8 (1):3-15.
    As kendo continues to gain in international popularity, there are hopes for its adoption in the Olympic Games as an international competitive event, even while moves to further this aim have not necessarily occurred in Japan or elsewhere. One reason for the efforts to achieve a form of globalization of kendo different from Judo is the attempt to adhere to and preserve the unique concepts kendo, the sport embodies by remaining true to the forms of traditional Japanese culture. This (...)
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  36.  76
    Deleuze on Music, Painting, and the Arts.Ronald Bogue - 2003 - Routledge.
    Bogue provides a systematic overview and introduction to Deleuze's writings on music and painting, and an assessment of their position within his aesthetics as a whole. Deleuze on Music, Painting and the Arts breaks new ground in the scholarship on Deleuze's aesthetics, while providing a clear and accessible guide to his often overlooked writings in the fields of music and painting.
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  37. Imagination, Philosophy, and the Arts.Matthew Kieran & Dominic Lopes (eds.) - 2003 - Routledge.
    Imagination is a central concept in aesthetics with close ties to issues in the philosophy of mind and the philosophy of language, yet it has not received the kind of sustained, critical attention it deserves. Imagination, Philosophy and the Arts represents the work of fifteen young yet distinguished philosophers of art, who critically examine just how and in what form the notion of imagination illuminates fundamental problems in the philosophy of art. All new papers, a strong collection on the imagination (...)
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  38.  28
    The Arts and Human Nature: Evolutionary Aesthetics and the Evolutionary Status of Art Behaviours.Anton Killin - 2013 - Biology and Philosophy 28 (4):703-718.
    This essay reviews one of the most recent books in a trend of new publications proffering evolutionary theorising about aesthetics and the arts—themes within an increasing literature on aspects of human life and human nature in terms of evolutionary theory. Stephen Davies’ The Artful Species links some of our aesthetic sensibilities with our evolved human nature and critically surveys the interdisciplinary debate regarding the evolutionary status of the arts. Davies’ engaging and accessible writing succeeds in demonstrating the maturity and scope (...)
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  39.  51
    Philosophy of the Performing Arts.David Davies - 2011 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    This book provides an accessible yet sophisticated introduction to the significant philosophical issues concerning the performing arts.
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  40.  31
    Understanding Japanese CSR: The Reflections of Managers in the Field of Global Operations. [REVIEW]Kyoko Fukukawa & Yoshiya Teramoto - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (1):133 - 146.
    This paper examines how Japanese multinational companies manage corporate social responsibility (CSR). It considers how the concept has come to be framed within Japanese business, which is increasingly globalized and internationally focused, yet continues to exhibit strong cultural specificities. The discussion is based on interviews with managers who deal with CSR issues and strategy on a day-to-day basis from 13 multinational companies. In looking at how CSR practice has been adopted and adapted by Japanese corporations, we can (...)
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  41.  14
    A Phenomenological Approach to Inquiring Into an Ethically Bankrupted Organization: A Case Study of a Japanese Company. [REVIEW]Nobuyuki Chikudate - 2000 - Journal of Business Ethics 28 (1):59 - 72.
    This study introduced a phenomenological approach to the study of the companies that committed corporate crimes. The author first developed the epistemology of normative control which is based on the philosophical ground of phenomenology, sociology of knowledge, ethnomethodology, Habermas's normative theories, and Foucault's normalizing discourse in the context of organizations. He, then, showed the procedures for conducting a qualitative and phenomenological empirical case study of an aggressive Japanese company whose name appeared in the media for its scandal in Tokyo. (...)
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  42.  35
    Consumer Ethics in Japan: An Economic Reconstruction of Moral Agency of Japanese Firms – Qualitative Insights From Grocery/Retail Markets.Sigmund Wagner-Tsukamoto - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (1):29-44.
    The article reconstructs, in economic terms, managerial business ethics perceptions in the Japanese consumer market for fast-moving daily consumption products. An economic, three-level model of moral agency was applied that distinguishes unintentional moral agency, passive intentional moral agency and active intentional moral agency. The study took a qualitative approach and utilized as empirical research design an interview procedure. The study found that moral agency of Japanese firms mostly extended up to unintentional and intentional passive moral agency. Certain myopic (...)
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  43.  29
    Does Corporate Philanthropy Exist?: Business Giving to the Arts in the U.K.Lance Moir & Richard Taffler - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 54 (2):149-161.
    This paper addresses the question of the existence of corporate philanthropy. It proposes a framework for analysing corporate philanthropy along the dimensions of business/society interest and primary/secondary stakeholder focus. The framework is then applied in order to understand business involvement with the arts in the U.K. A unique dataset of 60 texts which describe different firms' involvement with the Arts is analysed using formal content analysis to uncover the motivations for business involvement. Cluster analysis is then used in order to (...)
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  44. Zen and Japanese Culture.Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki - 1959 - New York]Pantheon Books.
    One of this century's leading works on Zen, this book is a valuable source for those wishing to understand its concepts in the context of Japanese life and art.
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  45.  26
    Philosophies of Arts: An Essay in Differences.Peter Kivy - 1997 - Cambridge University Press.
    Since the beginning of the eighteenth century the philosophy of art has been engaged on the project of trying to find out what the fine arts have in common and, thus, how they might be defined. Peter Kivy's purpose in this accessible and lucid book is to trace the history of that enterprise and argue that the definitional project has been unsuccessful. He offers a fruitful change of strategy: instead of engaging in an obsessive quest for sameness, let us explore (...)
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  46.  19
    Sunao as Character: Its Implications for Trust and Intercultural Communication Within Subsidiaries of Japanese Multinationals in Australia. [REVIEW]Joanna Crossman & Hiroko Noma - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 113 (3):543-555.
    Drawing upon the findings of a grounded theory study, this article addresses how sunao-sa influences intercultural communication and the process of building and developing trust between Japanese expatriate managers and Australian supervisors working in subsidiaries of Japanese multinationals in Australia. The authors argue that sunao is related to other concepts in business ethics and virtue literature such as character and its constituents, empathy and concern for others. How sunao as a value, influences the process of interpreting intercultural behaviour (...)
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  47.  4
    What Does It Mean for “Japanese Philosophy” To Be “Japanese”? A Kyoto School Discussion of the Particular Character of Japanese Thought.Takeshi Morisato - 2016 - Journal of World Philosophies 1 (1):13–25.
    This article provides a critical introduction to, and the first English translation of, the dialogue held between Nishida Kitarō and Miki Kiyoshi in October 1935. The topic of their discussion was the question of the particular character of Japanese culture and philosophy. In the introductory sections of this article, I will reflect on some of the main points that Nishida proposes in response to Miki’s questions, and clarify what these insights mean for a culture or a historical framework of (...)
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  48.  19
    Universities and the Promotion of Corporate Responsibility: Reinterpreting the Liberal Arts Tradition. [REVIEW]Darryl Reed - 2004 - Journal of Academic Ethics 2 (1):3-41.
    The issue of corporate responsibility has long been discussed in relationship to universities, but generally only in an ad hoc fashion. While the role of universities in teaching business ethics is one theme that has received significant and rather constant attention, other issues tend to be raised only sporadically. Moreover, when issues of corporate responsibility are raised, it is often done on the presumption of some understanding of a liberal arts mandate of the university, a position that has come under (...)
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  49.  38
    Bowing to Your Enemies: Courtesy, Budō , and Japan.Damon A. Young - 2009 - Philosophy East and West 59 (2):pp. 188-215.
    Courtesy seems to be an essential part of budō , the Japanese martial ways. Yet there is no prima facie relationship between fighting and courtesy. Indeed, we might think that violence and aggression are antithetical to etiquette and care. By situating budō within the three great Japanese traditions of Shintō, Confucianism, and Zen Buddhism, this article reveals the intimate relationship between courtesy and the martial arts. It suggests that courtesy cultivates, and is cultivated by, purity of work and (...)
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  50.  9
    The Distribution of Quantificational Suffixes in Japanese.Kazuko Yatsushiro - 2009 - Natural Language Semantics 17 (2):141-173.
    The existential and universal quantifiers in Japanese both consist of two morphemes: an indeterminate pronoun and a quantificational suffix. This paper examines the distributional characteristics of these suffixes (ka for the existential quantifier and mo for the universal quantifier). It is shown that ka can appear in a wider range of structural positions than mo can. This difference receives explanation on semantic grounds. I propose that mo is a generalized quantifier. More specifically, I assume that the phrase headed by (...)
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