Results for 'Artworks'

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Bibliography: Art and Artworks in Aesthetics
Bibliography: Artworks in Aesthetics
Bibliography: Art and Artworks, Misc in Aesthetics
  1. Repeatable Artworks as Created Types.Lee Walters - 2013 - British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (4):461-477.
    I sketch here an intuitive picture of repeatable artworks as created types, which are individuated in part by historical paths (re)production. Although attractive, this view has been rejected by a number of authors on the basis of general claims about abstract objects. On consideration, however, these general claims are overgeneralizations, which whilst true of some abstracta, are not true of all abstract objects, and in particular, are not true of created types. The intuitive picture of repeatable artworks as (...)
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  2.  79
    Are Artworks More Like People Than Artifacts? Individual Concepts and Their Extensions.George E. Newman, Daniel M. Bartels & Rosanna K. Smith - 2014 - Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (4):647-662.
    This paper examines people's reasoning about identity continuity and its relation to previous research on how people value one-of-a-kind artifacts, such as artwork. We propose that judgments about the continuity of artworks are related to judgments about the continuity of individual persons because art objects are seen as physical extensions of their creators. We report a reanalysis of previous data and the results of two new empirical studies that test this hypothesis. The first study demonstrates that the mere categorization (...)
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  3. Destroying Artworks.Marcus Rossberg - 2013 - In Christy Mag Uidhir (ed.), Art & Abstract Objects. Oxford University Press.
    This paper investigates feasible ways of destroying artworks, assuming they are abstract objects, or works of a particular art-form, where the works of at least this art-form are assumed to be abstracta. If artworks are eternal, mind-independent abstracta, and hence discovered, rather than created, then they cannot be destroyed, but merely forgotten. For more moderate conceptions of artworks as abstract objects, however, there might be logical space for artwork destruction. Artworks as abstracta have been likened to (...)
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  4. Artwork Completion: A Response to Gover.Kelly Trogdon & Paisley Nathan Livingston - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (4):460-462.
    Response to Gover (2015) on Trogdon and Livingston (2015) on artwork completion.
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  5. Artworks as Historical Individuals.Guy Rohrbaugh - 2003 - European Journal of Philosophy 11 (2):177–205.
    In 1907, Alfred Stieglitz took what was to become one of his signature photographs, The Steerage. Stieglitz stood at the rear of the ocean liner Kaiser Wilhelm II and photographed the decks, first-class passengers above and steerage passengers below, carefully exposing the film to their reflected light. Later, in the darkroom, Stieglitz developed this film and made a number of prints from the resulting negative. The photograph is a familiar one, an enduring piece of social commentary, but what exactly is (...)
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  6.  80
    Repeatable Artwork Sentences and Generics.Shieva Kleinschmidt & Jacob Ross - 2013 - In Christy Mag Uidhir (ed.), Art and Abstract Objects. Oxford University Press. pp. 125.
    We seem to talk about repeatable artworks, like symphonies, films, and novels, all the time. We say things like, "The Moonlight Sonata has three movements" and "Duck Soup makes me laugh". How are these sentences to be understood? We argue against the simple subject/predicate view, on which the subjects of the sentences refer to individuals and the sentences are true iff the referents of the subjects have the properties picked out by the predicates. We then consider two alternative responses (...)
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  7. How Artworks Modify Our Perception of the World.Alfredo Vernazzani - 2021 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-22.
    Many artists, art critics, and poets suggest that an aesthetic appreciation of artworks may modify our perception of the world, including quotidian things and scenes. I call this Art-to-World, AtW. Focusing on visual artworks, in this paper I articulate an empirically-informed account of AtW that is based on content related views of aesthetic experience, and on Goodman’s and Elgin’s concept of exemplification. An aesthetic encounter with artworks demands paying attention to its aesthetic, expressive, or design properties that (...)
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  8.  85
    Artworks: Definition, Meaning, Value.Robert Stecker - 1997 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 56 (3):311-313.
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  9. Artworks Versus Designs.John Dilworth - 2001 - British Journal of Aesthetics 41 (2):162-177.
    I propose a distinction between design intentions, activities and products, as opposed to artistic intentions, activities and artworks. Examples of design products would include a specific type of car (or any other invention or device) as well as closer relatives of art such as decorative wall designs. In order to distinguish artistic from design intentions, I present an example in which two sculptors independently work on a single object to produce two sculptures, which are distinct just because the artistic (...)
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  10.  31
    The Artwork and the Promesse du Bonheur in Adorno.James Gordon Finlayson - 2015 - European Journal of Philosophy 23 (3):392-419.
    Adorno's saying that ‘art is the promise of happiness’ radiates into every corner of his work from his aesthetic theory to his critical theory of society. However, it is much misunderstood. This can be seen from the standard answer to the question: in virtue of what formal features do art works, according to Adorno, promise happiness? The standard answer to this question suggests that the aesthetic harmony occasioned by the organic wholeness of the form realized in the artwork contrasts with (...)
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  11. Artworks Are Not Valuable for Their Own Sake.Nicholas F. Stang - 2012 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (3):271-280.
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  12.  26
    Repeatable Artworks and the Relevant Similarity Relation.Sherri Irvin - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 52 (2):30.
    Repeatable artworks, such as novels and musical works, have often been construed as universals whose instances are particular printings or performances. In Art and Art-Attempts, Christy Mag Uidhir offers a nominalist account of repeatable artworks, eschewing talk of universals. Mag Uidhir argues that all artworks are concrete, and artworks that we regard as repeatable are simply unified by a relevant similarity relation: we use the name Beloved to refer to two concrete printed novels because they are (...)
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  13. Artworks and Real Things.Arthur C. Danto - 1973 - Theoria 39 (1-3):1-17.
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  14.  29
    The Artwork Made Me Do It: Introduction to the New Sociology of Art.Eduardo De La Fuente - 2010 - Thesis Eleven 103 (1):3-9.
    The sociology of art has experienced a significant revival during the last three decades. However, in the first instance, this renewed interest was dominated by the ‘production of culture’ perspective and was heavily focused on contextual factors such as the social organization of artistic markets and careers, and displays of ‘cultural capital’ through consumption of the arts. In this article, I outline a new mode of approaching art sociologically that begins with Alfred Gell’s (1998) Art and Agency, but comes to (...)
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  15. Artworks as Artifacts.Jerrold Levinson - 2007 - In Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (eds.), Creations of the Mind: Theories of Artifacts and Their Representaion. Oxford University Press. pp. 74--82.
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  16.  57
    Obligations to Artworks as Duties of Love.Anthony Cross - 2017 - Estetika 54 (1):85-101.
    It is uncontroversial that our engagement with artworks is constrained by obligations; most commonly, these consist in obligations to other persons, such as artists, audiences, and owners of artworks. A more controversial claim is that we have genuine obligations to artworks themselves. I defend a qualified version of this claim. However, I argue that such obligations do not derive from the supposed moral rights of artworks – for no such rights exist. Rather, I argue that these (...)
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  17.  63
    Placing Artworks—Placing Ourselves.Joseph Margolis - 2004 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (1):1–16.
  18.  45
    Why Artworks Have No Right to Have Rights.Francis Sparshott - 1983 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 42 (1):5-15.
  19. Artworks.Robert Stecker - 2001 - Mind 110 (438):565-569.
     
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  20. The Artwork Discarded.Anita Silvers - 1976 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 34 (4):441-454.
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  21.  23
    Artwork and Document in the Photography of Louise Lawler.Sherri Irvin - 2012 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (1):79-90.
    What makes a photograph an artwork, as opposed to a mere document? I defend a cluster account such that aesthetic value, aptness to interpretation, the artist’s intention and institutional uptake may contribute to the arthood of a body of photographs, with no single condition being necessary. With regard to Lawler’s works, I suggest that Lawler’s intention that they be art plays a definitive role because of the works’ resemblance to non-art photography. For some of her photographs, however, it appears that (...)
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  22. Artworks: Meaning, Definition, Value.Robert Stecker - 1996 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    What is art? What is it to understand a work of art? What is the value of art? Robert Stecker seeks to answer these central questions of aesthetics by placing them within the context of an ongoing debate criticizing, but also explaining what can be learned from, alternative views. His unified philosophy of art, defined in terms of its evolving functions, is used to explain and to justify current interpretive practices and to motivate an investigation of artistic value. Stecker defines (...)
     
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  23.  7
    Artworks, Objects and Structures.Sherri Irvin - 2012 - In Anna Christina Ribeiro (ed.), The Continuum Companion to Aesthetics. Continuum. pp. 55-73.
    This essay examines the difficulties faced by the claim that artworks are simple physical objects (or, in the case of non-visual art forms, simple structures of another sort) and examines alternative proposals regarding their ontological nature.
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  24. Aesthetic Judgements, Artworks and Functional Beauty.Stephen Davies - 2006 - Philosophical Quarterly 56 (223):224-241.
    I offer an analysis of the role played by consideration of an item's functions when it is judged aesthetically. The account applies also to artworks, of which some serve extrinsic functions (such as the glorification of God and the communication of religious lore) and others have the function of being contemplated for their own sake alone. Along the way, I deny that aesthetic judgements fit the model of judgements either of free beauty or of dependent beauty, given how these (...)
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  25. The Aesthetic Experience of Artworks and Everyday Scenes.Bence Nanay - 2018 - The Monist 101 (1):71-82.
    Some of our aesthetic experiences are of artworks. Some others are of everyday scenes. The question I examine in this paper is about the relation between these two different kinds of aesthetic experience. I argue that the experience of artworks can dispose us to experience everyday scenes in an aesthetic manner both short-term and long-term. Finally, I examine what constraints this phenomenon puts on different accounts of aesthetic experience.
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  26.  20
    Artwork as Technics.Mark Jackson - 2016 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 48 (13).
    ‘Artwork as technics’ opens discussion on activating aesthetics in educational contexts by arguing that we require some fundamental revision in understanding relations between aesthetics and technology in contexts where education is primarily encountered instrumentally and technologically. The paper addresses this through the writing of the French theorist of technology, Bernard Stiegler, as well as extending Stiegler’s own discussion on the work of Martin Heidegger concerning the work of art and technology. Crucial to this discussion is recognition of the thinking of (...)
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  27.  39
    The Artwork as Gesture.Michalle Gal - 2014 - Paragrana: Internationale Zeitschrift für Historische Anthropologie 23 (1):15-22.
    This paper analyzes the concept of “the artwork as gesture” via two opposite approaches to expression: the cognitivist and the formalist. I claim that applied to the artwork as a whole, the concept of “gesture” captures art's influence on the spectator, its moral effect, and mostly its unique expressiveness—since an expressive positioning of itself is what the gestural artwork does. For cognitivism, gesture is a denotative-referential communication. For formalism, gesture is an expressive position, though not an expression of something. “Gesture” (...)
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  28.  55
    Artworks, Context and Ontology.Božidar Kante - 2004 - Acta Analytica 19 (33):209-219.
    Horgan believes that the truth of the statement “Beethoven’s fifth symphony has four movements” does not require that there be some “dedicated object” answering to the term “Beethoven’s fifth simphony”. To the contrary, the relevant language/world correspondence relation is less direct than this. Especially appropriate is the behavior by Beethoven that we would call “composing his fifth symphony”. Our objections go along two directions: (1) is the process ontology (a) really a right kind of ontology for artworks (symphonies, novels) (...)
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  29.  34
    Artworks: Definition, Meaning, Value.Stein Haugom Olsen - 2003 - Philosophical Review 112 (2):247-250.
    In this book Robert Stecker sets out to answer three basic questions in the philosophy of art: What is art? What is it to understand a work of art? And what is the value of art? Stecker addresses each question in turn and delivers what he claims to be “a unified, if incomplete, philosophy of art—a theory of the nature and functions of art and of the practice of interpreting and appreciating it”. His strategy is to discuss thoroughly recent contributions (...)
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  30.  32
    Artworks: Definition, Meaning, Value.Stein Haugom Olsen - 2003 - Philosophical Review 112 (2):247-250.
    In this book Robert Stecker sets out to answer three basic questions in the philosophy of art: What is art? What is it to understand a work of art? And what is the value of art? Stecker addresses each question in turn and delivers what he claims to be “a unified, if incomplete, philosophy of art—a theory of the nature and functions of art and of the practice of interpreting and appreciating it”. His strategy is to discuss thoroughly recent contributions (...)
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  31.  36
    Artworks in Word and Image: 'So True, So Full of Being!'.Hans-Georg Gadamer - 2006 - Theory, Culture and Society 23 (1):57-83.
    The arts, taken as whole, govern the metaphysical heritage of the western philosophical tradition. The arts possess absoluteness in that in the experience of art we recognize something as ‘aright’, as true. Art also possesses absoluteness because it transcends all historical differences between eras. Art - and philosophy - possess a contemporaneity in that they attune themselves to the present time. Art is thus not a refined pleasure but something that shows us a world that is there for itself and (...)
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  32.  28
    Artworks as Dichotomous Objects: Implications for the Scientific Study of Aesthetic Experience.Robert Pepperell - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  33.  8
    Artworks’ Networks.Niels Albertsen & Bülent Diken - 2004 - Theory, Culture and Society 21 (3):35-58.
    Focusing on the connections between the artwork and its internal and external network, the article presents four different approaches to the sociology of art developed by Lyotard, Bourdieu, Luhmann, and Hennion and Latour. While Lyotard, from a phiosophical point of view, emphasizes the transcendence of the artwork in relation to its network, for Bourdieu the work of art is part of a network and the ‘social genesis’ grounds the artwork as an artwork. In contrast to Bourdieu, Luhmann conceives of art (...)
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  34.  44
    Artworks and Representational Properties.Sherri Irvin - 2004 - Dialogue 43 (4):627-644.
    A sustained challenge to the view that artworks are physical objects relates to the alleged inability of physical objects to possess representational properties, which some artworks clearly do possess. I argue that the challenge is subject to confusions about representational properties and aesthetic experience. I show that a challenge to artwork-object identity put forward by Danto is vulnerable to a similar criticism. I conclude by noting that the identity of artworks and physical objects is consistent with the (...)
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  35.  1
    Artwork as Social Model: A Manual of Questions and Propositions.Stephen Willats - 2012 - Rgap (Research Group for Artists).
    This manual, which includes texts, interviews and artwork from five decades of practice, is intended as a tool for any artist or practitioner looking to find a meaningful relationship with contemporary society. It proclaims, and argues for, a culture that promotes the fluid, transient, relative and complex society from which it stems.
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  36.  65
    Artworks, Art Theory, and the Artworld.Richard J. Sclafani - 1973 - Theoria 39 (1-3):18-34.
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  37.  35
    Altering Artworks: Creators’ Moral Rights Vs. The Public Good.Lawrence Lengbeyer - 2005 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 12 (2):53-61.
    The grounds for recognizing that artists possess a personal “moral right of integrity” that would entitle them to prevent others from modifying their works are weak. There is, however, an important public interest in protecting highly-valued entities, including at least some works of art, from permanently destructive transformations.
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  38.  12
    The 'Scientific Artworks' of Doctor Paul Richer.Natasha Ruiz-Gómez - 2013 - Medical Humanities 39 (1):4-10.
    This article examines the little-known sculptures of pathology created by Doctor Paul Richer (1849–1933) in the 1890s for the so-called Musée Charcot at the Hôpital de la Salpêtrière in Paris. Under the direction of Doctor Jean-Martin Charcot (1825–1893), one of the founders of modern neurology, Richer was the head of the hospital's museum of pathological anatomy, as well as the Salpêtrière's resident artist. His ‘series of figural representations of the principal types of nervous pathology’ included busts of patients suffering from (...)
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  39. Artworks Are Attentional Engines: Normative Conventions and Evaluative Perception in the Arts.William Seeley - 2014 - In Aaron Kozbelt (ed.), Proceedings of the International Association of Empirical Aesthetics. pp. 372-376.
    There is a standard skeptical concern within philosophy of art that causal explanations in psychology and neuroscience apply equally to our engagement with art that is done well and art that is done poorly and so do not contribute to our understanding of the normative dimension of artistic appreciation. This skeptical concern is often used to challenge the relevance of psychology and neuroscience to our understanding of art. I sketch a crossmodal model for perception which demonstrates that those affective processes (...)
     
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  40.  32
    Altering Artworks: Creators' Moral Rights Vs. The Public Good.Lawrence Lengbeyer - 2005 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 12 (2):53-61.
    The grounds for recognizing that artists possess a personal “moral right of integrity” that would entitle them to prevent others from modifying their works are weak. There is, however, an important (and legislation-worthy) public interest in protecting highly-valued entities, including at least some works of art, from permanently destructive transformations.
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  41.  43
    Artists' Intentions and Artwork Meanings: Some Complications.Stephen Davies - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (2):138 - 139.
    Artists' intentions are among the primary data retrieved by art appreciators. However, artistic creation is not always deliberate; artists sometimes fail in their intentions; artists' achievements depend on artworld roles, not only intentions; factors external to the artist contribute to artwork meaning; artworks stand apart from their creators; and interpretation need not be exclusively concerned with recovering intended meaning.
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  42.  2
    Frameworks, Artworks, Place: The Space of Perception in the Modern World.Tim Mehigan - 2008 - Rodopi.
    How space – mental, emotional, visual – is implicated in our constructions of reality and our art is the focus of this set of innovative essays. For the first time art theorists and historians, visual artists, literary critics and philosophers have come together to assay the problem of space both within conventional discipline boundaries and across them. What emerges is a stimulating discussion of the problem of embodied space and situated consciousness that will be of interest to the general reader (...)
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  43.  4
    Artistic Conversations: Artworks and Personhood.Stephen Snyder - 2019 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 19 (2):233-252.
    This essay explores claims made frequently by artists, critics, and philosophers that artworks bear personifying traits. Rejecting the notion that artists possess the Pygmalion-like power to bring works of art to life, the article looks seriously at how parallels may exist between the ontological structures of the artwork and human personhood. The discussion focuses on Arthur Danto’s claim that the “artworld” itself manifests properties that are an imprint of the historical representation of the “world.” These “world” representations are implicitly (...)
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  44.  39
    The Limits of Art: On Borderline Cases of Artworks and Their Aesthetic Properties.Jiri Benovsky - 2020 - Springer.
    This open access book is about exploring interesting borderline cases of art. It discusses the cases of gustatory and olfactory artworks, proprioceptive artworks, intellectual artworks, as well as the vague limits between painting and photography. The book focuses on the author’s research about what counts as art and what does not, as well as on the nature of these limits. Overall, the author defends a very inclusive view, 'extending' the limits of art, and he argues for its (...)
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  45.  18
    Artworks That End and Objects That Endure.Lucian Krukowski - 1981 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 40 (2):187-197.
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  46.  5
    Perceiving Artworks.Arthur Danto - 1981 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 39 (3):315-316.
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  47.  9
    Perceiving Artworks.Jane Cauvel - 1983 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 17 (2):125.
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  48. Artwork and Sportwork: Heideggerian Reflections.Julian Young - 1999 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 57 (2):267-277.
  49. The Aesthetic Experience of Artwork.Mika Suojanen - 2014 - In Kaisa Koivisto, Jani Kukkola, Timo Latomaa & Pirkko Sandelin (eds.), Experience Research IV. Rovaniemi: Lapland University Press. pp. 57–72.
    What is beautiful or ugly vary from one person another, from time to time and from culture to culture. However, at the same time, people are certain that there are aesthetic properties in the nature, artworks and other persons and, furthermore, they can be perceived by the naked eye. This article argues that experience does not reveal the aesthetic properties of the objects.
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  50. The Abstractness of Artworks and Its Implications for Aesthetics.John Dilworth - 2008 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (4):341-353.
    Artworks have at least some necessary content properties, as do abstract entities such as propositions. But no concrete item, whether an object, event, process etc., could have any necessary content property. So no artwork could be identical with a concrete item. Hence artworks must be abstract. I also argue that artworks are only contingently connected with concrete items, just as propositions are only contingently linked to their linguistic tokens.
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