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Ashley Feinsinger
University of California, Los Angeles
  1.  15
    Creating Space for Feminist Ethics in Medical School.Georgina D. Campelia & Ashley Feinsinger - 2020 - HEC Forum 32 (2):111-124.
    Alongside clinical practice, medical schools now confront mounting reasons to examine nontraditional approaches to ethics. Increasing awareness of systems of oppression and their effects on the experiences of trainees, patients, professionals, and generally on medical care, is pushing medical curriculum into an unfamiliar territory. While there is room throughout medical school to take up these concerns, ethics curricula are well-positioned to explore new pedagogical approaches. Feminist ethics has long addressed systems of oppression and broader structures of power. Some of its (...)
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  2.  17
    “They were already inside my head to begin with”: Trust, Translational Misconception, and Intraoperative Brain Research.Ally Peabody Smith, Lauren Taiclet, Hamasa Ebadi, Lilyana Levy, Megan Weber, Eugene M. Caruso, Nader Pouratian & Ashley Feinsinger - 2023 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 14 (2):111-124.
    Background: Patients undergoing invasive neurosurgical procedures offer researchers unique opportunities to study the brain. Deep brain stimulation patients, for example, may participate in research during the surgical implantation of the stimulator device. Although this research raises many ethical concerns, little attention has been paid to basic studies, which offer no therapeutic benefits, and the value of patient-participant perspectives.Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with fourteen individuals across two studies who participated in basic intraoperative research during their deep brain stimulator surgery. Interviews (...)
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  3.  33
    The variation problem.Ashley Feinsinger - 2020 - Philosophical Studies 178 (1):317-338.
    It is often assumed that two linguistic agents can come to understand one another in part because they use the same words. That is, many philosophical theories of communication posit an intersubjective same-word relation. However, giving an account of this relation is complicated by what I call “The Variation Problem”—a problem resulting from the fact that the same word can be pronounced differently. In this paper, I first argue that previous models of the same-word relation, including Kaplanian and Chomskyan models, (...)
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  4.  15
    The Value of Heterogeneity in Practices to Promote Ethical Research.Ashley Feinsinger, Michelle Pham & Nader Pouratian - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 12 (1):80-82.
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  5.  11
    Disentangling Function from Benefit: Participant Perspectives from an Early Feasibility Trial for a Novel Visual Cortical Prosthesis.Lilyana Levy, Hamasa Ebadi, Ally Peabody Smith, Lauren Taiclet, Nader Pouratian & Ashley Feinsinger - forthcoming - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience.
    The field of neurotechnology intervening on blindness is rapidly expanding with several visual neural prostheses currently in development (Lowery 2013; Niketeghad and Pouratian 2019; Ptito et al. 2...
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  6.  22
    Medicalization and linguistic agency.Ashley Feinsinger & David Friedell - 2020 - Ratio 33 (4):232-242.
    Medicalization is the process by which conditions, for example, intellectual disability, hyperactivity in children, and posttraumatic stress disorder, become understood as medical disorders. During this process, the medical community often collectively assigns a label to a condition and consequently to those who would be said to have the disorder. We argue that there are at least two previously overlooked ways in which this linguistic practice may be wrongful, and sometimes, unjust: first, when the initial introduction of a medical label is (...)
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  7.  18
    Engagement, Exploitation, and Human Intracranial Electrophysiology Research.Michelle T. Pham, Nader Pouratian & Ashley Feinsinger - 2022 - Neuroethics 15 (3):1-15.
    Motivated by exploitation concerns, we argue for the importance of participant engagement in basic human intracranial electrophysiology research. This research takes advantage of unique neurosurgical opportunities to better understand complex systems of the human brain, but it also exposes participants to additional risks without immediate therapeutic intent. We argue that understanding participant values and incorporating their perspectives into the research process may help determine whether and to what extent research practices and the resulting distributions of risks and benefits constitute exploitation (...)
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  8.  5
    Ethical commitments, principles, and practices guiding intracranial neuroscientific research in humans.Ashley Feinsinger & Nader Pouratian - 2022 - Neuron 110 (2):188-194.
    Leveraging firsthand experience, BRAIN-funded investigators conducting intracranial human neuroscience research propose two fundamental ethical commitments: (1) maintaining the integrity of clinical care and (2) ensuring voluntariness. Principles, practices, and uncertainties related to these commitments are offered for future investigation.
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  9.  2
    Extending patient-centred communication to non-speaking intellectually disabled persons.Ally Peabody Smith & Ashley Feinsinger - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    Patient-centred communication is widely regarded as a best practice in contemporary medical care, both in terms of maximising health outcomes and respecting persons. However, not all patients communicate in ways that are easily understood by clinicians and other healthcare professionals. This is especially so for patients with non-speaking intellectual disabilities. We argue that assumptions about intellectual disability—including those in diagnostic criteria, providers’ implicit attitudes and master narratives of disability—negatively affect communicative approaches towards intellectually disabled patients.Non-speakingintellectually disabled patients may also be (...)
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