8 found
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  1.  2
    Fine-Grained Sensitivity to Statistical Information in Adult Word Learning.Athena Vouloumanos - 2008 - Cognition 107 (2):729-742.
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  2.  9
    Understanding the Abstract Role of Speech in Communication at 12months.Alia Martin, Kristine H. Onishi & Athena Vouloumanos - 2012 - Cognition 123 (1):50-60.
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  3.  13
    Listen Up! Speech is for Thinking During Infancy.Athena Vouloumanos & Sandra R. Waxman - 2014 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 18 (12):642-646.
  4.  11
    From Semantics to Syntax and Back Again: Argument Structure in the Third Year of Life.Keith J. Fernandes, Gary F. Marcus, Jennifer A. Di Nubila & Athena Vouloumanos - 2006 - Cognition 100 (2):B10-B20.
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  5.  37
    Exclusion Constraints Facilitate Statistical Word Learning.Katherine Yoshida, Mijke Rhemtulla & Athena Vouloumanos - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (5):933-947.
    The roles of linguistic, cognitive, and social-pragmatic processes in word learning are well established. If statistical mechanisms also contribute to word learning, they must interact with these processes; however, there exists little evidence for such mechanistic synergy. Adults use co-occurrence statistics to encode speech–object pairings with detailed sensitivity in stochastic learning environments (Vouloumanos, 2008). Here, we replicate this statistical work with nonspeech sounds and compare the results with the previous speech studies to examine whether exclusion constraints contribute equally to the (...)
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  6.  16
    When and How Does Autism Begin?Jennifer M. D. Yoon & Athena Vouloumanos - 2014 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 18 (6):272-273.
  7.  2
    Foundational Tuning: How Infants' Attention to Speech Predicts Language Development.Athena Vouloumanos & Suzanne Curtin - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (8):1675-1686.
    Orienting biases for speech may provide a foundation for language development. Although human infants show a bias for listening to speech from birth, the relation of a speech bias to later language development has not been established. Here, we examine whether infants' attention to speech directly predicts expressive vocabulary. Infants listened to speech or non-speech in a preferential listening procedure. Results show that infants' attention to speech at 12 months significantly predicted expressive vocabulary at 18 months, while indices of general (...)
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  8.  1
    Who Can Communicate with Whom? Language Experience Affects Infants’ Evaluation of Others as Monolingual or Multilingual.Casey E. Pitts, Kristine H. Onishi & Athena Vouloumanos - 2015 - Cognition 134:185-192.
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