Results for 'Auguste Plato'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  81
    Plato's Symposium: A Translation by Seth Benardete with Commentaries by Allan Bloom and Seth Benardete. Plato - 2001 - University of Chicago Press.
    This new edition brings together the English translation of the renowned Plato scholar and translator, Seth Benardete, with two illuminating commentaries on it: Benardete's "On Plato's Symposium" and Allan Bloom's provocative essay, "The ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2. The Theaetetus of Plato.Lewis Plato & Campbell - 1861 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    M. J. Levett's elegant translation of Plato's _Theaetetus_, first published in 1928, is here revised by Myles Burnyeat to reflect contemporary standards of accuracy while retaining the style, imagery, and idiomatic speech for which the Levett translation is unparalleled. Bernard William’s concise introduction, aimed at undergraduate students, illuminates the powerful argument of this complex dialogue, and illustrates its connections to contemporary metaphysical and epistemological concerns.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  3.  87
    Plato's Cosmology: The Timaeus of Plato. Plato - 1937 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    ". . . one of the masterpieces of classical scholarship. . . . Contemporary work on the Timaeus will inevitably take Plato's Cosmology as its starting point." -- Charles H Kahn, University of Pennsylvania.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. The Meno of Plato.E. Seymer Plato & Thompson - 1961 - W. Heffer.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  5. The Phaedrus of Plato.W. H. Plato & Thompson - 1868 - Whittaker George Bell.
  6. Plato's Statesman.J. B. Plato & Skemp - 1952 - Routledge & Kegan Paul.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  7. Plato's Meno.Malcolm Plato, W. K. C. Brown & Guthrie - 1971 - Bobbs-Merrill.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8. The Gorgias of Plato.W. H. Plato & Thompson - 1871 - George Bell.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9. Know Thyself Plato's First Alcibiades and Commentary.Floyer Plato, Thomas Sydenham, Guy Taylor, Tim Wyndham-Jones & Addey - 2002
  10. The Power of Plato.Stephen R. Plato & Hill - 2002
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  30
    Plato: Clitophon. Plato - 1999 - Cambridge University Press.
    A text with translation, introduction and commentary of a dialogue ascribed to Plato, first published in 1999.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12.  54
    Plato's Theaetetus: Part I of The Being of the Beautiful. Plato - 1986 - University of Chicago Press.
    He was the author or translator of many books, most recently The Argument of the Action, Plato's "Laws," and Plato's "Symposium," all published by the University of Chicago Press.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  13.  40
    Plato's Cosmology. Plato - 1937 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    ". . . one of the masterpieces of classical scholarship. . . . Contemporary work on the Timaeus will inevitably take Plato's Cosmology as its starting point." -- Charles H Kahn, University of Pennsylvania.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  25
    Plato's Statesman: Part III of The Being of the Beautiful. Plato - 1986 - University Of Chicago Press.
    He was the author or translator of many books, most recently The Argument of the Action, Plato's "Laws," and Plato's "Symposium," all published by the University of Chicago Press.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  25
    Plato's Sophist: Part II of The Being of the Beautiful. Plato - 1986 - University of Chicago Press.
    He was the author or translator of many books, most recently The Argument of the Action, Plato's "Laws," and Plato's "Symposium," all published by the University of Chicago Press.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Plato's Theory of Knowledge: The Theaetetus and the Sophist. Plato - 2003 - Courier Dover Publications.
    Translated by the noted classical scholar Francis M. Cornford, this edition of two masterpieces of Plato's later period features extensive ongoing commentaries by Cornford that provide helpful background information and valuable insights.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  26
    Plato's Theory of Knowledge: The Theatetus and the Sophist. Plato - 2003 - Courier Dover Publications.
    Translated by the noted classical scholar Francis M. Cornford, this edition of two masterpieces of Plato's later period features extensive ongoing commentaries by Cornford that provide helpful background information and valuable insights.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  15
    Selections From Plato. Plato - 1911 - University of Oklahoma Press.
    This classic text, which contains the complete Greek text of the Apology and of Crito with other selections, offers an introduction to Plato’s language as well as an introduction to Socrates as presented by Plato.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  37
    The Tragedy and Comedy of Life: Plato's Philebus. Plato - 2009 - University of Chicago Press.
    In The Tragedy and Comedy of Life, Seth Benardete focuses on the idea of the good in what is widely regarded as one of Plato's most challenging and complex dialogues, the Philebus.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  27
    The Works of Plato. Plato - 1871 - New York: the Modern Library.
    THE REPUBLIC OF PLATO. BOOK I. ARGUMENT. The first Book opens with a pleasant and highly dramatic dialogue, in the course of which the happy old Cephalus (a kind of Maecenas on a small scale) sings the praises of an independent old age, ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  7
    Collection des Universités de France: Platon, Œuvres Complètes: Tome III, 2e Partie, Gorgias Et Ménon. By Alfred Croiset and Louis Bodin. 16 F. — Tome VIII, 1re Partie, Parménide. By Auguste Diès. 10 F. Paris: Association Guillaume Budé, 1923. - The Laws of Plato, the Text Edited with Introduction, Notes, Etc., by E. B. England, Litt.D. 2 Vols. Manchester University Press, 1921. [REVIEW]R. D. E. - 1924 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 44 (1):133-134.
  22.  20
    The Budé Plato Platon: Tome XI (Ire et 2e parties): Les Lois (livres 1–6). Texte établi et traduit par Édouard des Places; introduction de Auguste Diès et Louis Gernet. 2 vols. Pp. ccxxi+(double) 70; (double) 154. Paris: Les Belles Lettres, 1951. Paper. [REVIEW]J. V. Luce - 1953 - The Classical Review 3 (02):96-98.
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Idées Introduction a la Philosophie : Platon, Descartes, Hegel, Comte. Alain - 1939 - Paul Hartmann.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Essays, Philosophical and Theological.James Martineau - 1866 - Holt.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Le Nombre de Platon Essai d'Exégèse Et D'Histoire.Auguste Diès & Plato - 1936 - Imprimerie Nationale.
  26. Plato's Theory of Knowledge.Ralph Wedgwood - 2018 - In David Brink, Susan Sauvé Meyer & Christopher Shields (eds.), Virtue, Happiness, Knowledge: Themes from the Work of Gail Fine and Terence Irwin. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 33-56.
    An account of Plato’s theory of knowledge is offered. Plato is in a sense a contextualist: at least, he recognizes that his own use of the word for “knowledge” varies – in some contexts, it stands for the fullest possible level of understanding of a truth, while in other contexts, it is broader and includes less complete levels of understanding as well. But for Plato, all knowledge, properly speaking, is a priori knowledge of necessary truths – based (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  16
    Fleeing the Divine: Plato's Rejection of the Ahedonic Ideal in the Philebus.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2010 - In John Dillon & Brisson Luc (eds.), Plato's Philebus: Selected Papers From the Eighth Symposium Platonicum. pp. 209-214.
    Note: "Next to Godliness" (Apeiron) is an expanded version of this paper. -/- According to Plato's successors, assimilation to god (homoiosis theoi) was the end (telos) of the Platonic system. There is ample evidence to support this claim in dialogues ranging from the Symposium through the Timaeus. However, the Philebus poses a puzzle for this conception of the Platonic telos. On the one hand, Plato states that the gods are beings beyond pleasure while, on the other hand, he (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Rethinking Plato’s Forms.Necip Fikri Alican & Holger Thesleff - 2013 - Arctos: Acta Philologica Fennica 47:11–47.
    This is a proposal for rethinking the main lines of Plato’s philosophy, including some of the conceptual tools he uses for building and maintaining it. Drawing on a new interpretive paradigm for Plato’s overall vision, the central focus is on the so-called Forms. Regarding the guiding paradigm, we propose replacing the dualism of a world of Forms separated from a world of particulars, with the monistic model of a hierarchically structured universe comprising interdependent levels of reality. Regarding the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  29. Plato as Teacher of Socrates?Rafael Ferber - 2016 - In International Plato Studies. St. Augustin: Academia Verlag. pp. 443-448.
    What distinguishes the Socrates of the early from the Socrates of the middle dialogues? According to a well-known opinion, the “dividing line” lies in the difference between the Socratic and the Platonic theory of action. Whereas for the Platonic Socrates of the early dialogues, all desires are good-dependent, for the Platonic Socrates of the middle dialogues, there are good-independent desires. The paper argues first that this “dividing line” is blurred in the "Symposium", and second that we have in the "Symposium" (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  7
    Plato’s Cosmological Medicine in the Discourse of Eryximachus in the Symposium. The Responsibility of a Harmonic Techne.Laura Candiotto - 2015 - Plato: The Internet Journal of the International Plato Society 15:81-93.
    By comparing the role of harmony in Eryximachus’ discourse with other Platonic passages, especially from the Timaeus, this article aims to provide textual evidence concerning Plato’s conception of cosmological medicine as “harmonic techne”. The comparison with other dialogues will enable us to demonstrate how Eryximachus’ thesis is consistent with Plato’s cosmology — a cosmology which cannot be reduced to a physical conception of reality but represents the expression of a dialectical, and erotic cosmos, characterized by the agreement of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  31.  56
    The Value of Rule in Plato’s Dialogues: A Reply to Melissa Lane.David Ebrey - 2016 - Plato: The Internet Journal of the International Plato Society 16:75-80.
    A reply to Melissa Lane's "Antianarchia: interpreting political thought in Plato" In these comments I focus on how to think of antianarchia as an element of Plato's political thought, and in doing so raise some methodological questions about how to read Plato’s dialogues, focusing on what is involved in attributing views to Plato in general.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  11
    Socrates, Wake Up! An Analysis and Exegesis of the “Preface” in Plato’s Crito.Yosef Z. Liebersohn - 2015 - Plato: The Internet Journal of the International Plato Society 15:29-40.
    In this paper I offer a close analysis of the first scene in Plato’s Crito. Understanding a Platonic dialogue as a philosophical drama turns apparent scene-setting into an integral and essential part of the philosophical discussion. The two apparently innocent questions Socrates asks at the beginning of the Crito anticipate Crito’s two problems, namely how he regards his friendship with Socrates as opposed to his complicated relations with the polis and its sovereignty. These two questions are an integral part (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33. Plato's Statesman and Xenophon's Cyrus.Carol Atack - 2018 - In Gabriel Danzig, Donald Morrison & David M. Johnson (eds.), Plato and Xenophon: comparative studies. Leiden, Netherlands: pp. 510-543.
    This paper examines the relationship between the political thought of Plato and Xenophon, by positioning both as post-Socratic political theorists. It seeks to show that Xenophon and Plato examine similar themes and participate in a shared discourse in their later political thought, and in particular, that Plato is responding to Xenophon, with the Statesman exploring similar themes to Xenophon’s Cyropaedia, which itself responds to sections of Plato’s Republic. Both writers explore the themes of the shepherd king (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  54
    The Secret Doctrine and the Gigantomachia: Interpreting Plato’s Theaetetus-Sophist.Brad Berman - 2015 - Plato Journal 14:53-62.
    The Theaetetus’ ‘secret doctrine’ and the Sophist ’s ‘battle between gods and giants’ have long fascinated Plato scholars. I show that the passages systematically parallel one another. Each presents two substantive positions that are advanced on behalf of two separate parties, related to one another by their comparative sophistication or refinement. Further, those parties and their respective positions are characterized in substantially similar terms. On the basis of these sustained parallels, I argue that the two passages should be read (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  10
    Dialectic in Plato’s Late Dialogues.Kenneth Sayre - 2016 - Plato: The Internet Journal of the International Plato Society 16:81-89.
    Plato’s method of hypothesis is initiated in the Meno, is featured in the Phaedo and the Republic, and is further developed in the Theaetetus. His method of collection and division is mentioned in the Republic, is featured in the Phaedrus,and is elaborated with modifications in the Sophist and the Statesman. Both methods aim at definitions in terms of necessary and sufficient conditions. In the course of these developments, the former method is shown to be weak in its treatment of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  9
    Comments on K. Sayre, “Dialectic in Plato’s Late Dialogues”.Mark A. Johnstone - 2016 - Plato: The Internet Journal of the International Plato Society 16:91-94.
    A brief overview of Kenneth Sayre’s paper, “Dialectic in Plato’s Late Dialogues,” followed by critical discussion. I invite Sayre to clarify his views on the nature of the method of hypothesis in Plato, and on its relationships to Socratic dialectic and to the method of collection and division. I then ask whether we should think of Plato as aware, at the time of writing his dialogues, of weaknesses in the various methods of conducting philosophical inquiry he has (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  5
    Inspiration and Technē : Divination in Plato’s Ion.Aaron Landry - 2014 - Plato: The Internet Journal of the International Plato Society 14:85-97.
    In Plato’s Ion, inspiration functions in contradistinction to technē. Yet, paradoxically, in both cases, there is an appeal to divination. I interrogate this in order to show how these two disparate accounts can be accommodated. Specifically, I argue that Socrates’ appeal to Theoclymenus at Ion 539a-b demonstrates that Plato recognizes the existence of intuitive seers who defy his own distinction between possession and technical divination. Such seers provide an epistemic model for Ion; that he does not notice this (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. Animal Sacrifice in Plato's Later Methodology.Holly Moore - 2015 - In Jeremy Bell, Michael Naas & Thomas Patrick Oates (eds.), Plato's Animals: Gadflies, Horses, Swans, and Other Philosophical Beasts. Indianapolis, IN, USA: pp. 179-192.
    In both the Phaedrus and Statesman dialogues, the dialectician's method of division is likened to the butchery of sacrificial animals. Interpreting the significance of this metaphor by analyzing ancient Greek sacrificial practice, this essay argues that, despite the ubiquity of the method of division in these later dialogues, Plato is there stressing the logical priority of the method of collection, division's dialectical twin. Although Plato prioritizes the method of collection, the author further argues that, through a kind of (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  14
    The Parmenides of Plato.Plato - 1934 - Clarendon Press.
    of consciousness, we almost e0 @των assert that it is not to be found in the mature consciousness, except in a totally difierent shape. But, in Plato, the original aspect of the element reappears in the compound: το ἄπειρον is το ἄπειρον, and ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. The Law in Plato’s Laws: A Reading of the ‘Classical Thesis’.Luke William Hunt - 2018 - Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek Political Thought 35 (1):102-126.
    Plato’s Laws include what H.L.A. Hart called the ‘classical thesis’ about the nature and role of law: the law exists to see that one leads a morally good life. This paper develops Hart’s brief remarks by providing a panorama of the classical thesis in Laws. This is done by considering two themes: (1) the extent to which Laws is paternalistic, and (2) the extent to which Laws is naturalistic. These themes are significant for a number of reasons, including because (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Cinematic Spelunking Inside Plato's Cave.Maureen Eckert - 2012 - Glipmse Journal 9:42-49.
    Detailed exploration of the Allegory of the Cave, utilizing notions from film studies, may provide us with insight regarding the identity of the puppet masters in Plato's allegory.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. After the Ascent: Plato on Becoming Like God.John M. Armstrong - 2004 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 26:171-183.
    Plato is associated with the idea that the body holds us back from knowing ultimate reality and so we should try to distance ourselves from its influence. This sentiment appears is several of his dialogues including Theaetetus where the flight from the physical world is compared to becoming like God. In some major dialogues of Plato's later career such as Philebus and Laws, however, the idea of becoming like God takes a different turn. God is an intelligent force (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  43. The Psychagogic Work of Examples in Plato's Statesman. Moore - 2016 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 49 (3):300-322.
    This paper concerns the role of examples (paradeigmata) as propaedeutic to philosophical inquiry, in light of the methodological digression of Plato’s Statesman. Consistent with scholarship on Aristotle’s view of example, scholars of Plato’s work have privileged the logic of example over their rhetorical appeal to the soul of the learner. Following a small but significant trend in recent rhetorical scholarship that emphasizes the affective nature of examples, this essay assesses the psychagogic potential of paradeigmata, following the discussion of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Plato’s Ethics.Terence Irwin - 1995 - Oxford University Press.
    This exceptional book examines and explains Plato's answer to the normative question, "How ought we to live?" It discusses Plato's conception of the virtues; his views about the connection between the virtues and happiness; and the account of reason, desire, and motivation that underlies his arguments about the virtues. Plato's answer to the epistemological question, "How can we know how we ought to live?" is also discussed. His views on knowledge, belief, and inquiry, and his theory of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   55 citations  
  45.  57
    Plato and Pythagoreanism.Phillip Sidney Horky - 2013 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Was Plato a Pythagorean? Plato's students and earliest critics thought so, but scholars since the nineteenth century have been more skeptical. With this probing study, Phillip Sidney Horky argues that a specific type of Pythagorean philosophy, called "mathematical" Pythagoreanism, exercised a decisive influence on fundamental aspects of Plato's philosophy. The progenitor of mathematical Pythagoreanism was the infamous Pythagorean heretic and political revolutionary Hippasus of Metapontum, a student of Pythagoras who is credited with experiments in harmonics that led (...)
  46. Socratic Irony, Plato's Apology, and Kierkegaard's On the Concept of Irony.Paul Muench - 2009 - In Niels Jørgen Cappelørn, Hermann Deuser & K. Brian Söderquist (eds.), Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook. de Gruyter. pp. 71-125.
    In this paper I argue that Plato's Apology is the principal text on which Kierkegaard relies in arguing for the idea that Socrates is fundamentally an ironist. After providing an overview of the structure of this argument, I then consider Kierkegaard's more general discussion of irony, unpacking the distinction he draws between irony as a figure of speech and irony as a standpoint. I conclude by examining Kierkegaard's claim that the Apology itself is “splendidly suited for obtaining a clear (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  47.  33
    Review of Samuel Scolnicov, Plato’s Method of Hypothesis in the Middle Dialogues, Edited by Harold Tarrant.Evan Rodriguez - 2019 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 57 (3):549-550.
    This volume, a lightly-edited version of Professor Samuel Scolnicov’s 1974 Ph.D. thesis, is a fitting tribute to his impressive career. It will perhaps be most useful for those interested in better understanding Scolnicov’s work and his views on Plato as a whole, not least for the comprehensive list of his publications that requires a full twelve pages of print. Scholars with an interest in Plato’s method of hypothesis will also find some useful remarks on key passages in the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. An Introduction to Plato's Republic.Julia Annas - 1981 - Oxford University Press.
    This interpretive introduction provides unique insight into Plato's Republic. Stressing Plato's desire to stimulate philosophical thinking in his readers, Julia Annas here demonstrates the coherence of his main moral argument on the nature of justice, and expounds related concepts of education, human motivation, knowledge and understanding. In a clear systematic fashion, this book shows that modern moral philosophy still has much to learn from Plato's attempt to move the focus from questions of what acts the just person (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   55 citations  
  49. Persian Cosmos and Greek Philosophy: Plato's Associates and the Zoroastrian Magoi.Phillip Sidney Horky - 2009 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 37:47-103.
    Immediately upon the death of Plato in 347 BCE, philosophers in the Academy began to circulate stories involving his encounters with wisdom practitioners from Persia. This article examines the history of Greek perceptions of Persian wisdom and argues that the presence of foreign wisdom practitioners in the history of Greek philosophy has been undervalued since Diogenes Laertius.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. Receptacle/Chōra: Figuring the Errant Feminine in Plato's Timaeus.Emanuela Bianchi - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (4):124-146.
    This essay undertakes a reexamination of the notion of the receptacle/chōra in Plato's Timaeus, asking what its value may be to feminists seeking to understand the topology of the feminine in Western philosophy. As the source of cosmic motion as well as a restless figurality, labile and polyvocal, the receptacle/chōra offers a fecund zone of destabilization that allows for an immanent critique of ancient metaphysics. Engaging with Derridean, Irigarayan, and Kristevan analyses, Bianchi explores whether receptacle/chōra can exceed its reduction (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000