Results for 'Austin Harrison'

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  1. Frederic Harrison.Austin Harrison - 1926 - London: W. Heinemann.
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  2.  11
    How Ludwig Became a Homunculus: Harrison How Ludwig Became a Homunculus.Jonathan Harrison - 2009 - Think 8 (21):7-12.
    Jonathan Harrison teases our minds with two short stories ….
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  3. A Plea for Excuses' in Austin.J. L. Austin - 1961 - In J. O. Urmson & G. J. Warnock (eds.), Philosophical Papers. Clarendon Press.
     
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  4.  10
    Sitzler's Notice of Harrison's Theognis.E. Harrison - 1903 - The Classical Review 17 (09):470-.
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    Representation and Conceptual Change: Andrew Harrison.Andrew Harrison - 1972 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 6:106-131.
    This paper suffers from a disconcerting generality. I need an excuse for wandering from Wittgenstein's Tractatus to Picasso's drawing of a Weeping Woman, via the philosophy of science and the theory of sense data. The thesis of the paper is that I have such an excuse. These are all areas where the concept of representation either exists in its own right, or has been found to be illuminating by philosophers. An important question is whether it could be the same concept (...)
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  6.  2
    Sport as a Moral Practice: An Aristotelian Approach: Michael W. Austin.Michael W. Austin - 2013 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 73:29-43.
    Sport builds character. If this is true, why is there a consistent stream of news detailing the bad behavior of athletes? We are bombarded with accounts of elite athletes using banned performance-enhancing substances, putting individual glory ahead of the excellence of the team, engaging in disrespectful and even violent behavior towards opponents, and seeking victory above all else. We are also given a steady diet of more salacious stories that include various embarrassing, immoral, and illegal behaviors in the private lives (...)
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  7.  2
    Hooray! We're Not Morally Responsible!: Harrison Hooray! We're Not Morally Responsible!Gerald Harrison - 2009 - Think 8 (23):87-95.
    Being morally responsible means being blameworthy and deserving of punishment if we do wrong and praiseworthy and deserving reward if we do right. In what follows I shall argue that in all likelihood we're not morally responsible. None of us. Ever.
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  8.  9
    A Howler of Harrison'S.Jonathan Harrison - 1998 - Philosophical Quarterly 48 (193):526.
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  9.  1
    Transcendental Arguments and Idealism: Ross Harrison.Ross Harrison - 1982 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 13:211-224.
    ‘Metaphysics’, said Bradley, ‘is the finding of bad reasons for what we believe on instinct, but to find these reasons is no less an instinct.’ This idea that reasoning is both instinctive and feeble is reminiscent of Hume; except that reasons in Hume tend to serve as the solvent rather than the support of instinctive beliefs. Instinct leads us to play backgammon with other individuals whom we assume inhabit a world which exists independently of our own perception and which will (...)
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  10.  7
    Holcombe McCulloch Austin, 1909-2003.John H. M. Austin - 2003 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 76 (5):158 -.
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  11.  3
    Malcolm E. Finbow, Michael Harrison and Phillip Jones Reply.Malcolm Finbow, Mike Harrison & Phil Jones - 1995 - Bioessays 17 (8):745-745.
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  12.  2
    Religious Commitment and the Logical Status of Doctrines: WILLIAM H. AUSTIN.William H. Austin - 1973 - Religious Studies 9 (1):39-48.
    The great Falsification Debate about the logical status of religious beliefs seems fairly quiescent at present. Most philosophers of religion have opted for one or the other of two opposite responses to the falsificationists' challenge.
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    Cambridge Philosophers VI: Henry Sidgwick: Ross Harrison.Ross Harrison - 1996 - Philosophy 71 (277):423-438.
    The philosophy department in Edinburgh is in David Hume tower; the philosophy faculty at Cambridge is in Sidgwick Avenue. In one way, no competition. Everybody has heard of Hume, whereas even the anybody who's anybody may not have heard of Sidgwick. Yet in another way, Sidgwick wins this arcane contest. For if David Hume, contradicting the Humean theory of personal identity, were to return to Edinburgh, he would not recognize the tower. Whereas, if someone with more success in rearousing spirits (...)
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    Geach on Harrison on Geach on God.Jonathan Harrison - 1977 - Philosophy 52 (200):223 - 226.
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  15. Letter to the Editor – James H. Austin, A Note.James Winslow Austin - forthcoming - Contemporary Buddhism:1-6.
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  16. The Austinian Theory of Law: Being an Edition of Lectures I, V, and Vi of Austin's "Jurisprudence," and of Austin's "Essay on the Uses of the Study of Jurisprudence" with Critical Notes and Excursus.John Austin - 1906 - F.B. Rothman.
  17. The Positivist Library of August Comte, Tr. And Ed. By F. Harrison.Isidore Auguste M. Comte & Frederic Harrison - 1886
     
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  18. HARRISON, J. "Hume's Theory of Justice". [REVIEW]B. Harrison - 1983 - Mind 92:604.
     
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  19. J. Harrison, "Hume's Theory of Justice". [REVIEW]Geoffrey Harrison - 1982 - Philosophical Quarterly 32 (29):384.
     
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  20. Kant and the Sincere Fanatic: Bernard Harrison.Bernard Harrison - 1978 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 12:226-261.
    ‘I see well enough what poor Kant would be at’ said James Mill on first looking into the Kritik der reinen Vernunft. No one would wish to say that the reception of Kant in England has remained at this level: abundance of sound scholarship, innumerable Kant seminars and the swell of interest in transcendental argument which has developed since the Second World War all exist to prove the contrary. But in spite of all that, Mill's response still touches a chord (...)
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  21. On the Supposed Necessity of Certain Metaphysical Problems [a Paper by F. Harrison. No. 25 of a Ser.].Frederic Harrison - 1872
     
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  22.  19
    Logical Positivism and Ethics.Jonathan Harrison - 1989 - Cogito 3 (3):179-186.
    ADDRESS ETHICS WITHOUT PROPOSITIONS. By WINSTON H. F. BARNES 1 SYMPOSIUM : ARE ALL PHILOSOPHICAL QUESTIONS, QUESTIONS OF LANGUAGE I. By STUART HAMPSHIRE 31 II. By AUSTIN DUNAN JONES 49 III. By S. KORNER 63 SYMPOSIUM : THE EMOTIVE THEORY OF ETHICS. f. By RICHARD ROBINSON 79 II. ByH. J. PATON 107 III. ByR.C. CROSS 127 SYMPOSIUM : WHAT CAN LOGIC DO FOR PHILOSOPHY I. By K. K. POPPER 141 II. By WILLIAM KNEALE 155 III. By PROFESSOR A. J. (...)
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  23.  16
    Postclassica (1) The Pastoral Elegy. An Anthology. Edited with Introduction, Commentary, and Notes by T. P. Harrison. English Translations by H. J. Leon. Pp. Xii+312. Austin: University of Texas, 1939. Cloth, $2.50. (2)Li. W. Daly and W. Suchier: Altercatio Hadriani Augusti Et Epicteti Philosophi. Pp. 168. (Illinois Studies in Language and Literature, Vol. 24, Nos. 1–2.) Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1939. Paper, $2. (3)Vincent of Beauvais: De Eruditione Filiorum Nobilium. Edited by A. Steiner. Pp. Xxxn+236. (The Mediaeval Academy of America Publication No. 32.) Cambridge, Mass.: Mediaeval Academy of America, 1938. Cloth, $3.50 Post-Free. (4) Urbanus Magnus Danielis Becclesienis. Edited by J. G. Smyly. Pp. Viii+102. Dublin: Hodges, Figgis (London: Longmans), 1939. Cloth. (5)C. H. Buttimer: Hugonis de Sancto Victore Didascalicon De Studio Legendi. A Critical Text. Pp. Lii+160. (The Catholic University of America Studies in Medieval and Renaissanc Latin, Vol. X.) Washington, D.C. [REVIEW]Stephen Gaselee - 1939 - The Classical Review 53 (5-6):196-198.
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  24. Autobiographic Memoirs.Frederic Harrison - 1911 - Macmillan & Co..
     
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  25. How to Do Things with Words.J. L. Austin - 1962 - Clarendon Press.
    For this second edition, the editors have returned to Austin's original lecture notes, amending the printed text where it seemed necessary.
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  26. Philosophical Papers.J. L. Austin - 1961 - Oxford University Press.
    The influence of J. L. Austin on contemporary philosophy was substantial during his lifetime, and has grown greatly since his death, at the height of his powers, in 1960. Philosophical Papers, first published in 1961, was the first of three volumes of Austin's work to be edited by J. O. Urmson and G. J. Warnock. Together with Sense and Sensibilia and How to do things with Words, it has extended Austin's influence far beyond the circle who knew (...)
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  27. Sense and Sensibilia.J. L. Austin - 1962 - Oxford University Press.
    This book is the one to put into the hands of those who have been over-impressed by Austin 's critics....[Warnock's] brilliant editing puts everybody who is concerned with philosophical problems in his debt.
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  28. The Province of Jurisprudence Determined.John Austin - 1954 - Hackett.
    The Province of Jurisprudence Determined (1832) is a classic of nineteenth-century English jurisprudence, a subject on which Austin had a profound impact. His book is primarily concerned with a meticulous explanation of most of the core concepts of his legal philosophy, including his conception of law, his separation of law and morality, and his theory of sovereignty. Almost a quarter of it consists of an interpretation and defence of the principle of utility. This edition includes the complete and unabridged (...)
     
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  29. The Province of Jurisprudence Determined and the Uses of the Study of Jurisprudence.John Austin - 1954 - London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson.
    This edition comprises the full text of Austin's The Province of Jurisprudence Determined, a classic work of moral, political, and legal philosophy, and Austin ...
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  30.  31
    Bisexuality and the Problem of its Social Acceptance.C. R. Austin - 1978 - Journal of Medical Ethics 4 (3):132-137.
    Professor Austin explores four main areas in this paper. First of all he outlines the physical development of sex differentiation in the embryo. He develops this by describing the clinical manifestations of abnormality which can appear at that stage. Professor Austin points out that there are relatively few people with abnormalities and that those who do show homosexual tendencies are not noticeably different from the norm in terms of their sexual equipment and hormone levels. It is much more (...)
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  31.  7
    How Ludwig Became a Homunculus.Jonathan Harrison - 1996 - Philosophy 71 (277):439 - 444.
    Jonathan Harrison teases our minds with two short stories ….
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  32. The Encyclopedia of Biblical Ethics.R. K. Harrison (ed.) - 1992 - Testament Books.
    A comprehensive reference work for everyone concerned with the complicated moral issues of this world, this unique volume clearly communicates what Scripture teaches about the ethical dilemmas facing our society. Biological warfare, corporate responsibility, human rights, computer ethics, and much more are discussed by over fifty scholars who explain the moral guidelines in the Bible and historic Christian teachings. R.K. Harrison, author and editor of over thirty books on biblical studies, has brought together a valuable A to B treasury (...)
     
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  33.  4
    The Shimmering World: Living Meditation.Steven Harrison - 2008 - Sentient Publications.
    Steven Harrison's books have inspired many to examine their ideas about life and about spirituality in particular, and to come to a more direct perception of ...
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  34.  25
    Wittgenstein's Influence on Austin's Philosophy of Language.Daniel W. Harris & Elmar Unnsteinsson - forthcoming - British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-25.
    Did Wittgenstein influence Austin's philosophy of language, and, if so, when and how? There are currently two schools of thought, both of which are problematic. First, many assume without evidence argument that Austin's work was heavily influenced by Wittgenstein. Second, many of Austin's colleagues and students claim that Austin's work developed independently of Wittgenstein. We draw on textual evidence to argue that Austin's work on language was influenced, at all stages of its development, by engagement (...)
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  35.  81
    Stroud, Austin, and Radical Skepticism.Eros Moreira de Carvalho & Flavio Williges - 2016 - Sképsis 14:57-75.
    Is ruling out the possibility that one is dreaming a requirement for a knowledge claim? In “Philosophical Scepticism and Everyday Life” (1984), Barry Stroud defends that it is. In “Others Minds” (1970), John Austin says it is not. In his defense, Stroud appeals to a conception of objectivity deeply rooted in us and with which our concept of knowledge is intertwined. Austin appeals to a detailed account of our scientific and everyday practices of knowledge attribution. Stroud responds that (...)
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  36.  71
    Austin on Perception, Knowledge and Meaning.Lawlor Krista - forthcoming - In Savas Tsohatzidis (ed.), Interpreting Austin. Cambridge University Press.
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  37. Rule-Consequentialism.Brad Hooker - 1990 - Mind 99 (393):67-77.
    The theory of morality we can call full rule - consequentialism selects rules solely in terms of the goodness of their consequences and then claims that these rules determine which kinds of acts are morally wrong. George Berkeley was arguably the first rule -consequentialist. He wrote, “In framing the general laws of nature, it is granted we must be entirely guided by the public good of mankind, but not in the ordinary moral actions of our lives. … The rule is (...)
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  38.  21
    O argumento da ilusão/alucinação e o disjuntivismo: Ayer versus Austin.Eros Moreira de Carvalho - 2015 - Skepsis: A Journal for Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Research 12:85-106.
    The argument from illusion/hallucination have been proposed many times as supporting the strong conclusion that we are always perceiving directly sense-data. In Sense & Sensibilia, Austin argues that this argument is based on a “mass of seductive (mainly verbal) fallacies”. In this paper, I argue that Austin's argumentative moves to deconstruct the argument from illusion is better understood if they are seen as due to his implicit commitment to some disjunctivist conception of perception. His considerations should be taken (...)
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  39.  19
    Naturalising Austin.Renia Gasparatou - 2013 - Acta Analytica 28 (3):329-343.
    In this paper I will try to defend a quasi-naturalistic interpretation of J.L. Austin’s work. I will rely on P. Kitcher’s 1992 paper “The Naturalists Return” to compile four general criteria by which a philosopher can be called a naturalist. Then I will turn to Austin’s work and examine whether he meets these criteria. I will try to claim that versions of such naturalistic elements can be found in his work.
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  40. Austin on Sense-Data: Ordinary Language Analysis as 'Therapy'.Eugen Fischer - 2006 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 70 (1):67-99.
    The construction and analysis of arguments supposedly are a philosopher's main business, the demonstration of truth or refutation of falsehood his principal aim. In Sense and Sensibilia, J.L. Austin does something entirely different: He discusses the sense-datum doctrine of perception, with the aim not of refuting it but of 'dissolving' the 'philosophical worry' it induces in its champions. To this end, he 'exposes' their 'concealed motives', without addressing their stated reasons. The paper explains where and why this at first (...)
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  41.  19
    Into Terra Incognita: Charting Beyond Peter Harrison's the Territories of Science and Religion.Michael Fuller - 2016 - Zygon 51 (3):729-741.
    Peter Harrison's The Territories of Science and Religion throws down a serious challenge to advocates of dialogue as the primary means of engagement between science and religion. This article accepts the validity of this challenge and looks at four possible responses to it. The first—a return to the past—is rejected. The remaining three—exploring new epistemic frameworks for the encounter of science and religion, broadening out the engagement beyond the context of the physical sciences and Western culture, and looking at (...)
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  42. Austin and the Argument From Illusion.Roderick Firth - 1964 - Philosophical Review 73 (July):372-382.
    Firth argues that austin's criticisms of the argument from illusion do not destroy the argument. We can reformulate it in two ways so that it succeeds as a method of ostensibly defining terms denoting the sensory constituent of perceptual experience. One way maintains the act-Object distinction of the cartesian tradition and the other uses the language of "looks." (staff).
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  43.  75
    Austin On Whether Every Proposition Has A Contradictory.Michael Durrant & Charles Sayward - 1967 - Analysis 27 (April):167-170.
    Austin rejects the contention that every proposition has a contradictory. This paper finds problems with the case Austin makes for rejecting the contention in question.
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  44.  8
    Are Research Schools Necessary? Contrasting Models of 20th Century Research at Yale Led by Ross Granville Harrison, Grace E. Pickford and G. Evelyn Hutchinson.Nancy G. Slack - 2003 - Journal of the History of Biology 36 (3):501 - 529.
    This paper compares and contrasts three groups that conducted biological research at Yale University during overlapping periods between 1910 and 1970. Yale University proved important as a site for this research. The leaders of these groups were Ross Granville Harrison, Grace E. Pickford, and G. Evelyn Hutchinson, and their members included both graduate students and more experienced scientists. All produced innovative research, including the opening of new subfields in embryology, endocrinology and ecology respectively, over a long period of time. (...)
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  45.  41
    Missed It By That Much: Austin on Norms of Truth.Jeffrey Hershfield - 2012 - Philosophia 40 (2):357-363.
    A principal challenge for a deflationary theory is to explain the value of truth: why we aim for true beliefs, abhor dishonesty, and so on. The problem arises because deflationism sees truth as a mere logical property and the truth predicate as serving primarily as a device of generalization. Paul Horwich, attempts to show how deflationism can account for the value of truth. Drawing on the work of J. L. Austin, I argue that his account, which focuses on belief, (...)
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  46.  24
    John Langshaw Austin.Federica Berdini & Claudia Bianchi - 2013 - IEP- Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    J. L. Austin was one of the more influential British philosophers of his time, due to his rigorous thought, extraordinary personality, and innovative philosophical method. According to John Searle, he was both passionately loved and hated by his contemporaries. Like Socrates, he seemed to destroy all philosophical orthodoxy without presenting an alternative, equally comforting, orthodoxy. -/- Austin is best known for two major contributions to contemporary philosophy: first, his ‘linguistic phenomenology’, a peculiar method of philosophical analysis of the (...)
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  47.  28
    Austin on Perception.W. F. R. Hardie - 1963 - Philosophy 38 (July):253-263.
    ‘After it, the philosophy of perception cannot be discussed in ways it usually was discussed before.’ This is said about Sense and Sensibilia by Mr Bernard Williams in an article, ‘J. L. Austin's philosophy’, published in the Oxford Magazine of 6 December 1962. It is not quite clear what Mr Williams means by the remark. It might be understood as an endorsement of Austin's insistence that philosophers have lapsed into crudity and error through their neglect of distinctions marked (...)
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  48. Austin and Perception.Charles Sayward - 2001 - Acta Analytica 16 (27):169-193.
    Some of Austin's general statements about the doctrines of sense-datum philosophy are reviewed. It is concluded that Austin thought that in these doctrines "directly see" is given a new but inadequately explained and defined use. Were this so, the philosophical use of "directly see" would lack a definite sense and this would correspondingly affect the doctrines. They would lack definite truth-value. Against this, it is argued that the philosopher's use of "directly see" does not support Austin's general (...)
     
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  49. Has Austin Refuted the Sense-Datum Theory?A. J. Ayer - 1967 - Synthese 17 (June):117-140.
  50.  15
    J.L. Austin.G. J. Warnock - 1989 - Routledge.
    This book is available either individually, or as part of the specially-priced Arguments of the Philosphers Collection.
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