Results for 'Automatism'

86 found
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  1.  2
    Being on the Outside: Cinematic Automatism in Stanley Cavell’s The World Viewed.Lisa Trahair - 2014 - Film-Philosophy 18 (1):128-146.
    Stanley Cavell's The World Viewed was the first book on cinema to attempt to provide an ontological theorisation of film that could account not only for its popular instances and the reason why they enthralled audiences for over half a century but also for the demise of its mythic function and the possibility of its redemption in serious modernist film. Inadequately understood at the time of its publication, and for too long ignored by Film Studies, Cavell's arguments about modernist cinema (...)
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  2. From the Mouth of Shadows: On the Surrealist Use of Automatism.Opstrup Kasper - 2017 - Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 25 (53).
    From surrealism’s beginnings around a Parisian séance table, it oscillated between the occult and the political. One of its key methods, automatism, provided access to both the esoteric and the exoteric: it took form in the mid-19th century as a spiritualist technique for communicating with the other side while, simultanously, this other side could address political issues as equal rights, de-colonisation and a utopian future with an authority coming from beyond the individual. By tracing the development of automatism, (...)
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  3.  18
    Automatism and Dissociation: Disturbances of Consciousness and Volition From a Psychological Perspective.Hamish J. McLeod, Mitchell K. Byrne & Rachel Aitken - 2004 - International Journal of Law and Psychiatry 27 (5):471-487.
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  4.  5
    The Autonomy of Cultural Practice: Basis, Limit and Significance of the Possibility of Developing “Cultural Automatism”. [REVIEW]Zushe Yuan - 2011 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (1):134-144.
    Culture has always led a problematic existence. As a result, the diagnosis and treatment of various cultural diseases continue to depend on the embarrassing double identity of culture as both patient and doctor, hence making it difficult for culture to explore its own obscure recesses. The question of whether culture is autonomous and can be itself in its own way should therefore be considered theoretically. Since culture is closely associated with civilization, real culture must be generated from the florescence of (...)
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  5. Automatism, Causality and Realism: Foundational Problems in the Philosophy of Photography.Diarmuid Costello & Dawn M. Phillips - 2009 - Philosophy Compass 4 (1):1-21.
    This article contains a survey of recent debates in the philosophy of photography, focusing on aesthetic and epistemic issues in particular. Starting from widespread notions about automatism, causality and realism in the theory of photography, the authors ask whether the prima facie tension between the epistemic and aesthetic embodied in oppositions such as automaticism and agency, causality and intentionality, realism and fictional competence is more than apparent. In this context, the article discusses recent work by Roger Scruton, Dominic Lopes, (...)
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  6.  2
    Doing Without Deliberation: Automatism, Automaticity, and Moral Accountability,.Neil Levy & Tim Bayne - 2004 - International Review of Psychiatry 16 (4):209-15.
    Actions performed in a state of automatism are not subject to moral evaluation, while automatic actions often are. Is the asymmetry between automatistic and automatic agency justified? In order to answer this question we need a model or moral accountability that does justice to our intuitions about a range of modes of agency, both pathological and non-pathological. Our aim in this paper is to lay the foundations for such an account.
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  7.  1
    [Book Review] Automatism, Insanity, and the Psychology of Criminal Responsibility, a Philosophical Inquiry. [REVIEW]Robert F. Schopp - 1993 - Ethics 103 (3):594-596.
    This is a book about the role that psychological impairment should play in a theory of criminal liability. Criminal guilt in the Anglo-American legal tradition requires both that the defendant committed some proscribed act and did so with intent, knowledge, or recklessness. The second requirement corresponds to the intuitive idea that people should not be punished for something they did not do 'on purpose' or if they 'did not realize what they were doing'. Unlike many works in this area, this (...)
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  8.  15
    Animal Automatism and Machine Intelligence.Deborah Brown - 2015 - Res Philosophica 92 (1):93-115.
    Descartes’s uncompromising rejection of the possibility of animal intelligence was among his most controversial theses. That rejection is based on his commitment to the doctrine of animal automatism and two tests that he takes to be sufficient indicators of thought. Of these two tests, only the language test is truly definitive, and Descartes is firmly of the view that no animal could demonstrate the capacity to use signs to convey meaning in “all the circumstances of life.” The topic is (...)
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  9.  6
    Automatism and Agency Intertwined: A Spectrum of Photographic Intentionality.Carol Armstrong - 2012 - Critical Inquiry 38 (4):705-726.
    A concatenation of forces surrounded the rise of the photographic to the center of contemporary art practice. During the sixties the author-function was seriously critiqued. Roland Barthes announced the death of the author in 1967, and Michel Foucault answered his own question, what is an author? deconstructively in 1969, replacing what William Wimsatt and Monroe Beardsley had already termed the intentional fallacy with a model of the cultural constructedness of all notions of creative agency. At the same time, notions of (...)
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  10.  4
    Automat, Automatic, Automatism: Rosalind Krauss and Stanley Cavell on Photography and the Photographically Dependent Arts.Diarmuid Costello - 2012 - Critical Inquiry 38 (4):819-854.
    How might philosophers and art historians make the best use of one another's research? That, in nuce, is what this special issue considers with respect to questions concerning the nature of photography as an artistic medium; and that is what my essay addresses with respect to a specific case: the dialogue, or lack thereof, between the work of the philosopher Stanley Cavell and the art historian-critic Rosalind Krauss. It focuses on Krauss's late appeal to Cavell's notion of automatism to (...)
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  11. Automatism, Insanity, and the Psychology of Criminal Responsibility: A Philosophical Inquiry.Robert F. Schopp - 1991 - Cambridge University Press.
    This is a book about the role that psychological impairment should play in a theory of criminal liability. Criminal guilt in the Anglo-American legal tradition requires both that the defendant committed some proscribed act and did so with intent, knowledge, or recklessness. The second requirement corresponds to the intuitive idea that people should not be punished for something they did not do 'on purpose' or if they 'did not realize what they were doing'. Unlike many works in this area, this (...)
     
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  12. Human Thought: New Orientation Due To Automatism.R. J. van Egten & W. F. Chamberlin - 1959 - Diogenes 7 (27):82-101.
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  13.  65
    Animal Automatism and Consciousness.C. Lloyd Morgan - 1896 - The Monist 7 (1):1-18.
  14. The Mystery of Reproduction and the Limits of Automatism.R. Ruyer - 1964 - Diogenes 12 (48):53-69.
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  15.  91
    The Cartesian Test for Automatism.Gerald J. Erion - 2001 - Minds and Machines 11 (1):29-39.
    In Part V of his Discourse on the Method, Descartes introduces a test for distinguishing people from machines that is similar to the one proposed much later by Alan Turing. The Cartesian test combines two distinct elements that Keith Gunderson has labeled the language test and the action test. Though traditional interpretation holds that the action test attempts to determine whether an agent is acting upon principles, I argue that the action test is best understood as a test of common (...)
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  16.  32
    Automatism, Determinism, and Freedom.C. Lloyd Morgan - 1897 - The Monist 8 (1):148-149.
  17.  31
    Automatism and Spontaneity.Edmund Montgomery - 1893 - The Monist 4 (1):44-64.
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  18.  30
    Animal Automatism and Consciousness.Arthur Harington - 1896 - The Monist 7 (4):611-616.
  19.  27
    Automatism.Stewart P. Foltz - 1912 - The Monist 22 (1):91-123.
  20.  20
    Descartes and Henry More on the Beast-Machine—A Translation of Their Correspondence Pertaining to Animal Automatism.Leonora D. Cohen - 1936 - Annals of Science 1 (1):48-61.
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  21.  5
    Attention, Automatism, and Consciousness.Richard M. Shiffrin - 1997 - In Jonathan D. Cohen & Jonathan W. Schooler (eds.), Scientific Approaches to Consciousness. Lawrence Erlbaum. pp. 49--64.
  22.  8
    Automatism in Morality.John Grier Hibben - 1895 - International Journal of Ethics 5 (4):462-471.
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  23. Robert F. Schopp, Automatism, Insanity, and the Psychology of Criminal Responsibility Reviewed By.Elisabeth Boetzkes - 1992 - Philosophy in Review 12 (4):294-296.
     
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  24.  19
    Social Automatism and the Imitation Theory.B. Bosanquet - 1899 - Mind 8 (30):167-175.
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  25.  2
    Normal Motor Automatism.Leon M. Solomons & Gertrude Stein - 1896 - Psychological Review 3 (5):492-512.
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  26.  14
    The Preservation of Consciousness, Automatism, and Movement Control.Iraj Derakhshan - 2003 - Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences 15 (4):456.
  27.  6
    “Primeval Automatism”.Todd Cronan - 2007 - Overheard in Seville 25 (25):20-27.
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  28.  1
    Cultivated Motor Automatism; a Study of Character in its Relation to Attention.Gertrude Stein - 1898 - Psychological Review 5 (3):295-306.
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  29.  3
    Book Review:Automatism, Insanity, and the Psychology of Criminal Responsibility: A Philosophical Inquiry. Robert F. Schopp. [REVIEW]Larry Alexander - 1993 - Ethics 103 (3):594-.
  30. Social Automatism and the Imitation Theory.B. Bosanquet - 1899 - Philosophical Review 8:433.
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  31. Social Automatism and the Imitation Theory.Edward Franklin Buchner - 1899 - Psychological Review 6 (4):440-441.
  32. III“But IAmKilling Them!” Reply to Charles Palermo and Jan Baetens on Agency and Automatism.Diarmuid Costello - 2014 - Critical Inquiry 41 (1):178-210.
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  33. Automatism and Spontaneity. E. Montgomery - 1894 - Philosophical Review 3:235.
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  34. Automatism in Morality.John Grier Hibben - 1894 - Ethics 5 (4):462.
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  35. Automatism in Morality.John Grier Hibben - 1895 - International Journal of Ethics 5 (4):462-471.
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  36. Automatism in Morality.J. G. Hibben - 1895 - Philosophical Review 4:675.
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  37. Mental Automatism in Epileptics. Jackson - 1876 - Mind 1:272.
     
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  38. The New Psychology and Automatism.A. Seth - 1893 - Philosophical Review 2:484.
     
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  39.  88
    Précis of the Illusion of Conscious Will.Daniel M. Wegner - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (5):649-659.
    The experience of conscious will is the feeling that we are doing things. This feeling occurs for many things we do, conveying to us again and again the sense that we consciously cause our actions. But the feeling may not be a true reading of what is happening in our minds, brains, and bodies as our actions are produced. The feeling of conscious will can be fooled. This happens in clinical disorders such as alien hand syndrome, dissociative identity disorder, and (...)
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  40.  50
    Plasticity, Motor Intentionality and Concrete Movement in Merleau-Ponty.Timothy Mooney - 2011 - Continental Philosophy Review 44 (4):359-381.
    Merleau-Ponty’s explication of concrete or practical movement by way of the Schneider case could be read as ending up close to automatism, neglecting its flexibility and plasticity in the face of obstacles. It can be contended that he already goes off course in his explication of Schneider’s condition. Rasmus Jensen has argued that he assimilates a normal person’s motor intentionality to the patient’s, thereby generating a vacuity problem. I argue that Schneider’s difficulties with certain movements point to a means (...)
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  41.  37
    Freedom as a Natural Phenomenon.Martin Zwick - 2015 - Foundations of Science 20 (3):1-10.
    “Freedom” is a phenomenon in the natural world. This phenomenon—and indirectly the question of free will—is explored using a variety of systems-theoretic ideas. It is argued that freedom can emerge only in systems that are partially determined and partially random, and that freedom is a matter of degree. The paper considers types of freedom and their conditions of possibility in simple living systems and in complex living systems that have modeling subsystems. In simple living systems, types of freedom include independence (...)
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  42.  16
    Arts, Agents, Artifacts: Photography's Automatisms.Patrick Maynard - 2012 - Critical Inquiry 38 (4):727-745.
    Recent advances in paleoarchaeology show why nothing in the Tate Modern, where a conference on "Agency & Automatism" took place, challenges the roots of 'the idea of the fine arts' (Kristeller) as high levels of craft, aesthetics, mimesis and mental expression, as exemplifying cultures: it is by them that we define our species. This paper identifies and deals with resistances, early and late, to photographic fine art as based on concerns about automatism reducing human agency--that is, mental expression--then (...)
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  43.  9
    Pre-Objective Depth in Merleau-Ponty and Jackson Pollock.Michael Schreyach - 2013 - Research in Phenomenology 43 (1):49-70.
    Pollock’s drip technique generated certain unconventional representational possibilities, including the possibility of expressing the pre-reflective involvement of an embodied, intentional subject in a perceptual world. Consequently, Pollock’s art can be understood to explore or investigate the pre-objective conditions of reflective and intellectual consciousness. His painting—here I consider Number 1, 1949—motivates viewers to consider the relationship between intention and meaning as it appears in both primordial and reflective dimensions of experience. The account proceeds in three stages. First, I review key features (...)
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  44. The Empathic Brain: How, When and Why?Frederique De Vignemont & Tania Singer - 2006 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (10):435-441.
    Recent imaging results suggest that individuals automatically share the emotions of others when exposed to their emotions. We question the assumption of the automaticity and propose a contextual approach, suggesting several modulatory factors that might influence empathic brain responses. Contextual appraisal could occur early in emotional cue evaluation, which then might or might not lead to an empathic brain response, or not until after an empathic brain response is automatically elicited. We propose two major roles for empathy; its epistemological role (...)
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  45. Attitudes as Accessibility Bias: Dissociating Automatic and Controlled Processes.B. Keith Payne, Larry L. Jacoby & Alan J. Lambert - 2005 - In Ran R. Hassin, James S. Uleman & John A. Bargh (eds.), The New Unconscious. Oxford University Press. pp. 393-420.
  46.  25
    The Existence Of Mind.John Beloff - 1962 - McGibbon & Kee.
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  47.  59
    Cortical and Basal Ganglia Contributions to Habit Learning and Automaticity.F. Gregory Ashby, Benjamin O. Turner & Jon C. Horvitz - 2010 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (5):208.
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  48.  27
    What Are Intoxicated Offenders Responsible For? The “Intoxication Defense” Re-Examined.Susan Dimock - 2011 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 5 (1):1-20.
    I provide a brief history of the common law governing the criminal liability of intoxicated offenders, and the codification and application of the intoxication rules in Canada. I argue that the common law and its statutory application in Canada violate a number of principles of criminal justice. I then argue that the rules cannot be saved by attempts to subsume them under principles of prior fault. I end with a modest proposal for law reform.
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  49. Social Psychology and the Unconscious: The Automaticity of Higher Mental Processes.John A. Bargh (ed.) - 2007 - Psychology Press.
  50. Who is the Controller of Controlled Processes?Daniel M. Wegner - 2005 - In Ran R. Hassin, James S. Uleman & John A. Bargh (eds.), The New Unconscious. Oxford Series in Social Cognition and Social Neuroscience. Oxford University Press. pp. 19-36.
    Are we the robots? This question surfaces often in current psychological re- search, as various kinds of robot parts-automatic actions, mental mechanisms, even neural circuits-keep appearing in our explanations of human behavior. Automatic processes seem responsible for a wide range of the things we do, a fact that may leave us feeling, if not fully robotic, at least a bit nonhuman. The complement of the automatic process in contemporary psychology, of course, is the controlled process (Atkinson & Shiffrin, 1968; Bargh, (...)
     
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