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Aviad Raz [9]Aviad E. Raz [2]
  1.  39
    Exploring the Positions of German and Israeli Patient Organizations in the Bioethical Context of End-of-Life Policies.Aviad Raz, Isabella Jordan & Silke Schicktanz - 2014 - Health Care Analysis 22 (2):143-159.
    Patient organizations are increasingly involved in national and international bioethical debates and health policy deliberations. In order to examine how and to what extent cultural factors and organizational contexts influence the positions of patient organizations, this study compares the positions of German and Israeli patient organizations (POs) on issues related to end-of-life medical care. We draw on a qualitative pilot study of thirteen POs, using as a unit of analysis pairs comprised of one German PO and one Israeli PO that (...)
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  2.  21
    “What the Patient Wants…”: Lay Attitudes Towards End-of-Life Decisions in Germany and Israel.Julia Inthorn, Silke Schicktanz, Nitzan Rimon-Zarfaty & Aviad Raz - 2015 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 18 (3):329-340.
    National legislation, as well as arguments of experts, in Germany and Israel represent opposite regulatory approaches and positions in bioethical debates concerning end-of-life care. This study analyzes how these positions are mirrored in the attitudes of laypeople and influenced by the religious views and personal experiences of those affected. We qualitatively analyzed eight focus groups in Germany and Israel in which laypeople were asked to discuss similar scenarios involving the withholding or withdrawing of treatment, physician-assisted suicide, and euthanasia. In both (...)
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  3.  5
    One For All, All For One? Collective Representation in Healthcare Policy.Karin Jongsma, Nitzan Rimon-Zarfaty, Aviad Raz & Silke Schicktanz - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (3):337-340.
    Healthcare collectives, such as patient organizations, advocacy groups, disability organizations, professional associations, industry advocates, social movements, and health consumer organizations have been increasingly involved in healthcare policymaking. Such collectives are based on the idea that individual interests can be aggregated into collective interests by participation, deliberation, and representation. The topic of collectivity in healthcare, more specifically collective representation, has only rarely been addressed in bioethics. This symposium, entitled: “Collective Representation in Healthcare Policy” of the Journal of Bioethical Inquiry draws attention (...)
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  4.  29
    Diversity and Uniformity in Genetic Responsibility: Moral Attitudes of Patients, Relatives and Lay People in Germany and Israel. [REVIEW]Aviad E. Raz & Silke Schicktanz - 2009 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (4):433-442.
    The professional and institutional responsibility for handling genetic knowledge is well discussed; less attention has been paid to how lay people and particularly people who are affected by genetic diseases perceive and frame such responsibilities. In this exploratory study we qualitatively examine the attitudes of lay people, patients and relatives of patients in Germany and Israel towards genetic testing. These attitudes are further examined in the national context of Germany and Israel, which represent opposite regulatory approaches and bioethical debates concerning (...)
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  5.  78
    The Cultural Context of End-of-Life Ethics: A Comparison of Germany and Israel.Silke Schicktanz, Aviad Raz & Carmel Shalev - 2010 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (3):381-394.
    End-of-life decisions concerning euthanasia, stopping life-support machines, or handling advance directives are very complex and highly disputed in industrialized, democratic countries. A main controversy is how to balance the patient’s autonomy and right to self-determination with the doctor’s duty to save life and the value of life as such. These EoL dilemmas are closely linked to legal, medical, religious, and bioethical discourses. In this paper, we examine and deconstruct these linkages in Germany and Israel, moving beyond one-dimensional constructions of ethical (...)
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  6.  26
    The Cultural Context of Patient’s Autonomy and Doctor’s Duty: Passive Euthanasia and Advance Directives in Germany and Israel. [REVIEW]Silke Schicktanz, Aviad Raz & Carmel Shalev - 2010 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (4):363-369.
    The moral discourse surrounding end-of-life (EoL) decisions is highly complex, and a comparison of Germany and Israel can highlight the impact of cultural factors. The comparison shows interesting differences in how patient’s autonomy and doctor’s duties are morally and legally related to each other with respect to the withholding and withdrawing of medical treatment in EoL situations. Taking the statements of two national expert ethics committees on EoL in Israel and Germany (and their legal outcome) as an example of this (...)
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  7.  10
    Patient Representation and Advocacy for Alzheimer Disease in Germany and Israel.Silke Schicktanz, Nitzan Rimon-Zarfaty, Aviad Raz & Karin Jongsma - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (3):369-380.
    This paper analyses self-declared aims and representation of dementia patient organizations and advocacy groups in relation to two recent upheavals: the critique of social stigmatization and biomedical research focusing on prediction. Based on twenty-six semi-structured interviews conducted in 2016–2017 with members, service recipients, and board representatives of POs in Germany and Israel, a comparative analysis was conducted, based on a grounded theory approach, to detect emerging topics within and across the POs and across national contexts. We identified a heterogeneous landscape, (...)
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  8.  6
    Beyond Cultural Stereotyping: Views on End-of-Life Decision Making Among Religious and Secular Persons in the USA, Germany, and Israel.Mark Schweda, Silke Schicktanz, Aviad Raz & Anita Silvers - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):13.
    End-of-life decision making constitutes a major challenge for bioethical deliberation and political governance in modern democracies: On the one hand, it touches upon fundamental convictions about life, death, and the human condition. On the other, it is deeply rooted in religious traditions and historical experiences and thus shows great socio-cultural diversity. The bioethical discussion of such cultural issues oscillates between liberal individualism and cultural stereotyping. Our paper confronts the bioethical expert discourse with public moral attitudes. The paper is based on (...)
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  9.  10
    The Authorized Self: How Middle Age Defines Old Age in the Postmodern.Haim Hazan & Aviad E. Raz - 1997 - Semiotica 113 (3-4):257-276.
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  10.  2
    Saving or Subordinating Life? Popular Views in Israel and Germany of Donor Siblings Created Through PGD.Aviad Raz, Christina Schües, Nadja Wilhelm & Christoph Rehmann-Sutter - 2017 - Journal of Medical Humanities 38 (2):191-207.
    To explore how cultural beliefs are reflected in different popular views of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis for human leukocyte antigen match, we compare the reception and interpretations, in Germany and Israel, of the novel/film My Sister’s Keeper. Qualitative analysis of reviews, commentaries and posts is used to classify and compare normative assessments of PGD for HLA and how they reproduce, negotiate or oppose the national policy and its underlying cultural and ethical premises. Four major themes emanated from the comparison: loss of (...)
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  11.  25
    Responsibility Revisited.Silke Schicktanz & Aviad Raz - 2012 - Medicine Studies 3 (3):129-130.
    Recent developments in medicine open up new possibilities for planning and shaping life. At the same time, this scope of new options and interventions also involves new forms and spheres of responsibilities. Elderly persons can be viewed as having a responsibility toward their families and partners to plan, via advance health care directives, the final stages of their life; individuals can be seen as responsible for late onset diseases when ignoring public incitements for a healthy life style; and medical professionals (...)
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